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key spanish travel phrases

67 Essential Spanish Travel Phrases Every Traveller Needs To Know

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Spain. Mexico. Argentina. Peru. Colombia.

If you're learning Spanish , the mere the mention of these countries can leave you daydreaming about your next trip abroad.

And although there are many incredible things to do and see in Spanish-speaking countries, what really makes these places special are the local people.

So before you pack your bags and jump on a plane, why not learn a little Spanish to help you make the most of your trip?

In this post, you’ll learn 67 Spanish phrases for travel that can help you survive in the language during your trip abroad. And who knows, they might even help you make a few new friends too!

To make it easier for you, I’ve divided the phrases up into different categories:

Table of Contents

Take the time to learn a few of these key Spanish travel phrases and you’ll be able to mix with the locals, get by in various situations and have a much more enjoyable and authentic experience during your trip.

By the way, if you want to learn Spanish in time for your trip, my top recommendation for language learners is my Uncovered courses, which teach you through StoryLearning®.  Click here  to find out more and try out the method for free.

Press play on the video below to learn Spanish travel phrases thanks to a story. Otherwise, keep scrolling to discover all 67 Spanish travel words and expressions.

First Things First: Greetings To Use On Arrival

Knowing how to greet people is the most basic thing you can learn in a foreign language. And yet its importance shouldn't be underestimated.

Even if you aren’t fluent enough to hold a long conversation, a simple ¡Hola! ¿Qué tal?  (Hello, how are you?) can make all the difference.

You'll be able to use these expressions as soon as you arrive at your destination, whether it's at the airport, the train or bus station, or the hotel.

People appreciate it if you make an effort to speak their language when you visit their country, even if it’s only a few words.

Spanish-speaking countries are especially polite and greeting people correctly will go a long way towards endearing you to the locals, be they friends, people you meet in shops or on the street.

  • ( BWAY-nos DEE-as)
  • (BWAY-nas TAR-des)
  • (BWAY-nas NOH-chays)
  • (KOH-moh eh-STAH)
  • (KOH-moh eh-STAHS)
  • (bee-EN  GRA-thee-as [Spain] / GRA-see-as [Latin America])
  • (KOH-moh te YA-mas?)
  • (May YA-moh… )
  • (MOO-choh GOO-stoh)

And of course, let’s not forget common courtesy!

  • (por fa-BOR)
  • (GRA-thee-as [Spain] / GRA-see-as [Latin America])

If you get stuck in your Spanish conversation, you can always fall back on these next two phrases to get you out of trouble.

  • (yo no en-tee-EN-doh)
  • (Ab-la in-GLAYS)

Get What You Want On Your Trip With The Verb Querer 

Once you’ve finished greeting someone, you’ll need to be able to move on to the crux of your conversation and to do that you’ll need to learn a couple of common verbs.

There are hundreds of Spanish verbs to learn and, to make your life more difficult, these verbs conjugate (change form).

This means learning a verb is never as simple as learning one word; you have to learn multiple different forms.

Having said that, you might be surprised by how far you can get only knowing one simple verb: I want .

It may not make you the most sophisticated Spanish speaker but 9 times out of 10 it will get you what you, well, want .

The verb in question is querer (to want) and in the first person form, it becomes quiero (I want).

Let’s take a look at how you can use it:

  • (yo kee-EH-ro oon me-NOO)
  • (YO kee-EH-ro oon taxi)
  • (yo kee-EH-ro OO-na ser-BAY-za)

If you’d like to be a bit more polite (which is usually a good idea), you can also use:

  • (kee-see-EH-ra…)

Asking For & Understanding Directions On Your Trip

Whether you’re looking for the toilet in a restaurant or trying to find a hotel to stay at, you’ll inevitably need to ask for directions at some point during your trip.

The simplest way to ask where something is, is to use ¿Dónde está? followed by the noun you are looking for:

  • (DON-day es-TAH el BAH-nyo?)
  • (DON-day es-TAH el BAN-koh?)
  • (DON-day es-TAH la KA-yay de al-cal-AH?)

When travelling in a foreign country, if you're asking someone on the street for directions, don’t forget your manners! To get someone’s attention, start by saying:

  • (Dis-KUL-pay)
  • (Con per-MEE-soh / Per-DOH-nah-may)
  • (eh- stoy per-DEE-doh)

Asking for directions is one thing but it’s pretty pointless if you don’t know how to understand the directions that are given to you!

Memorise these phrases to help you understand what the friendly locals are trying to tell you when you ask for their help:

  • (A la de-RE-cha)
  • (A la iz-kee-ER-da)
  • (De-RE-cho)
  • (En la es-KEE-nah)
  • (a OO-na KWAD-rah)

Getting Around Spanish-Speaking Countries

If you’re not keen on walking everywhere, you'll need to be able to find out about local transport options to find your way around wherever you are.

Here are a few simple phrases you can use to locate a bus, train or taxi and get to wherever you need to go:

  • (DON-day PWAY-doh en-kon-TRAR oon taxi?)
  • (DON-day eh-STAH la pa-RAH-dah de ow-to-BOOS mas ser-KA-nah?)
  • (DON-day eh-STAH la es-tah-see-ON de ferro-carr-EEL mas ser-KA-nah?)
  • (KWAN-to KWES-ta oon bee-YET-ay PA-ra …)
  • (oon bee-YET-ay PA-ra … por fa-BOR)

At A Restaurant On Your Travels

Each Spanish-speaking country has its own unique flavours and cuisine for you to try when you travel!

Food is definitely one of the big attractions to cities like San Sebastian in Spain and Buenos Aires in Argentina , so you'll need to make sure you have a basic grasp of food vocabulary ahead of your journey!

To start with, you need to be prepared to hear and understand certain questions in restaurants, such as:

  • (kee-EH-res AL-go PA-ra koh-MER?)
  • (kee-EH-res AL-go PA-ra beh-BER?)
  • (KAY kee-EH-res koh-MER?)

When you read the menu, you'll see the available food grouped into different categories, just like in an English menu:

  • (oo-na en-TRA-da)
  • (oon PLA-toh prin-si-PAL)
  • (oon POS-tray)
  • (OO-na beh-BEE-da)

When you're ready to order, use either  quiero (I want) or  quisiera (I would like) with the items on the menu to tell the waiter what you'd like. For example,  quiero…

  • (OO-na SOH-pah)
  • (OO-na en-sa-LA-da)
  • (el POY-oh)
  • (la CAR-nay)
  • (oon AG-wa)
  • (oon BEE-noh TIN-toh / BLAN-koh)
  • (OO-na ser-BAY-sa)
  • (oon ka-FAY)

So, for example, to order that ice-cold beer you're looking forward to at the end of a long day, you'd say  quiero una cerveza.

Spanish vocab pack

If you're not sure what to try, you can always ask your waiter for a recommendation:

  • (kay may re-kom-ee-EN-dah?)

In most restaurants in Spanish-speaking countries, the staff will be more than happy to suggest a particularly tasty local dish for you to try.

If you're a vegetarian or you have dietary complications, these next two phrases are essential:

  • (soy be-he-tah-ree-AH-noh/nah)
  • (TEN-go al-ER-hee-ah a las noo-EH-ses)

Finally, let's learn a couple of quick phrases you can use to ask about prices and pay the bill.

  • (KWAN-to KWES-ta? )
  • (la KWEN-ta por fa-BOR)

Key Spanish Question Words For Your Trip

Over the course of your journey, you'll almost certainly find yourself asking lots and lots of questions.

You might not have a huge Spanish vocabulary to draw on, but if you know the basic question words, you'll be able to get by in almost any common situation you might find yourself in.

Here are some key Spanish question words you need to know:

  • (KWAN-doh?)
  • (A kay AW-ra?)
  • (KWAN-toh?)
  • (KWAN-tohs)
  • (kah-dah KWAN-toh?)
  • (por KWAN-toh tee-EM-poh)

Once you’ve got these question words in your memory bank you’ll start noticing the patterns in Spanish grammar which will help you to move away from the basic Spanish phrases every tourist is using.

As you learn new words on your trip, you'll be able to combine them with these question words to start forming your own sentences and questions!

Get Ready For Adventure With These Spanish Travel Phrases!

Take the time to memorise these key Spanish travel phrases and you'll have everything you need to get the most out of your journey.

With just a few words of Spanish, I'm sure you'll meet lots of amazing people and have plenty of life-changing experiences along the way.

Who knows, perhaps spending some time visiting a Spanish-speaking country will motivate you to strive for fluency?

travel words in spanish list

If this article has inspired you to both travel and to learn Spanish, then I've got something to get you started on your Spanish learning journey. 

I'm a big believer in the power of story to enable you to learn a language. That's why I've created an entire beginner course dedicated to learning Spanish by immersing yourself in an engaging story.

It's my Spanish Uncovered course, and it's designed to take you from beginner to B1 Intermediate level.

Click here for more information on the course, test it out for free and to find out how it'll help you.

travel words in spanish list

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Spanish for Travel – Learn Essential Spanish Vocabulary and Short Phrases for Your Next Trip

Spanish for Travel

This post includes:

  • Spanish travel phrases cheat sheet as PDF download
  • Audio to correct your pronunciation
  • Exercises to practice, 3 infographics, 2 podcast episodes, and an explanation video
  • A recommendation for the best travel apps to make the most of your trip to Spain

Table of Contents

Introduction.

1.1 Essential Spanish conversational phrases

  • Means of transportation   2.1 At the airport   2.2 Baggage related phrases 2.3 Buying tickets 2.4 At the train or the bus station 
  • At the car rental  3.1 Types of cars 3.2 Prices 3.3 Car information 3.4 Returning the car and emergency situations 3.5 Useful verbs

At the restaurant

At the hotel.

  • Basic Spanish directions 6.1 Asking for directions 6.2 Receiving directions
  • Essential phrases in Spanish for emergencies
  • The most commonly used verbs
  • Best apps for traveling in Spain

Looking to spice up your Spanish skills? From must-know verbs for your travels to nifty phrases that’ll make locals swoon, we’ve got you covered.

With our helpful Spanish phrases and words , you’ll be like a linguistic chameleon, seamlessly blending in wherever you go. Whether you’re exploring the vibrant streets of Mexico, basking in the Spanish sun, or even just soaking up the lively atmosphere of Miami, these phrases will be your secret weapon.

Here’s the secret sauce: ¡practice makes perfecto! Use these words and phrases until they flow effortlessly from your tongue until ordering tapas feels as natural as breathing. 

Let’s dive into our blog and unlock the language of adventure! ¡Vamos!

Essential Spanish Conversational Phrases

A big part of traveling abroad is meeting new people. It doesn’t matter where you meet them, it only matters what you say to them.  To have a broader picture check out our blog post about Greetings, Common Phrases and Most Common Questions in Spanish . The blog post was prepared for you by our experienced Spanish teachers.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-blogpost-travel-1.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Hola, ¿qué tal? – Hello, how are you?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-blogpost-travel-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Estoy bien, gracias. – I’m fine, thank you. 

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-blog-3.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] No estoy muy bien. / No estoy bien. – I’m not too well. / I’m not well.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Spanish-travel-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Buenos días. Buenas tardes. Buenas noches. – Good morning. Good afternoon. Good evening./Good night.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-4.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Adiós. Buenas noches. – Goodbye. Good night.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-6.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Hablas inglés? – Do you speak English?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-7.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Puedes ayudarme? – Can you help me?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-8.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Puedes hablar más despacio? No entiendo.   – Can you speak slower? I don’t understand. 

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-9.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Hasta mañana. / Hasta luego. / Hasta pronto. – See you tomorrow. / See you later. / See you soon.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/Disculpa-perdona.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Disculpa/Perdona. Por favor. Gracias. De nada. – Excuse me. Please. Thank you. You’re welcome.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-11.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Sí, por favor. No, gracias. – Yes, please. No, thanks.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¿Como-te-llamas_-Me-llamo.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cómo te llamas? Me llamo _____  – What’s your name? My name is _____

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¿Donde-vives_-Vivo-en-____.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde vives? Vivo en ____. – Where do you live? I live in ______.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-ttravel-14.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Encantado de conocerte. ¿De dónde eres? – Nice to meet you. Where are you from?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-15.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Soy de _______. – I’m from _________.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¿Cual-es-tu-profesion_-Soy-.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuál es tu profesión? Soy ______. – What’s your job? I’m a(n) _______. 

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/audio-travel-17.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuál es tu número de teléfono? Mi número de teléfono es _____ Llámame. Este es mi número de teléfono. – What’s your phone number? My phone number is… Call me. This is my phone number.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/correo-electronico.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuál es tu dirección de correo electrónico? Mi dirección de correo electrónico es_____. Envíame un correo electrónico. Esta es mi dirección de correo electrónico. – What’s your email address? My email address is… Email me. Here’s my email address.

The first step of traveling is planning. It can be fun but also quite stressful. It’s up to you to decide. In our podcast we talk about planning vacations in Spanish. You can listen to it on different platforms!

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Planning Vacations in Spanish: Listen to Our Podcast!

Means of transportation.

First, we need to get started with the transport   vocabulary . Have a look at the infographic you’ll find bellow. 

transport in spanish

At the Airport

If you are taking your first flight to Spain , you should be prepared for all the different dialects and accents you will hear and see on your trip. To smooth your experience, we provide you with a list of common words and phrases used at the airport in Spanish .

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-1.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está el mostrador de facturación? – Where is the check-in counter?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está el control de seguridad? – Where is the security checkpoint?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-3.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está el autobús de enlace que lleva al hotel? – Where is the hotel shuttle bus?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-4.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está la aduana? – Where are the customs?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-5.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está la parada de autobús? – Where is the bus stop?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-6.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está la terminal? – Where is the terminal?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Travel-for-spanish-blog.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está el baño/servicio/aseo ? – Where is the toilet?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¿A-que-hora-sale-el-avion_.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿A qué hora sale el avión? – What time does the plane leave?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-9.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿A qué hora llega el vuelo? – What time does the flight arrive?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-10.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuál es el número de vuelo? – What is the flight number?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-airport-11.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuál es el teléfono de la compañía aérea? – What is the airline’s phone number?

Baggage Related Phrases

Buying tickets.

Here you have some essential phrases and vocabulary  to buy tickets in Spanish. We know how stressful is to purchase tickets for buses, trains, airplanes or any event that you want to attend. But don’t panic! We are here to make your life easier.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¿Hablas-ingles_.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Hablas inglés? – Do you speak English?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-tickets-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ( Quería) un billete a Barcelona. – I want a ticket to Barcelona.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-tickets-3.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Un billete de ida a Santiago, por favor. – One way ticket to Santiago, please.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-tickets-4.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuánto cuesta el billete? – How much does the ticket cost?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-tickets-5.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuándo sale el avión/autobús/tren? – When does the plane/bus/train leave?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-tickets-6.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuándo llega el avión/autobús/tren? – When does the plane/bus/train arrive?

At the Train or the Bus Station

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-train-1.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuánto cuesta el billete? – How much does the ticket cost?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-train-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Un billete de ida a Valencia, por favor. – One way ticket to Valencia, please.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-train-3.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿A qué hora sale el tren para ___? – What time does the train to … leave?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-train-4.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está la parada del autobús número 11? – Where is the stop for bus number 11?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-train-5.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuándo llega el tren de ____? – When does the train from … arrive?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-train-6.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuál es la próxima parada? – What is the next stop?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-train-7.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuántas paradas más hay hasta ____? – How many more stops until…?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-train-8.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuánto dura el viaje? – How long is the journey? 

While traveling in Spanish-speaking countries it’s necessary to know the numbers and dates . Even if you know how to ask “ How much does it cost? ” – it doesn’t mean that you will understand the answer (yes, I’ve been there).

For this reason, we have created a complete post for Numbers in Spanish . If you have difficulties with long numbers or find yourself frustrated with 5, 15, 50, and 500, then you should definitely check it out.

At the Car Rental

  • Client : Buenos días. Quiero alquilar un coche. - Good afternoon. I would like to rent a car.
  • Renter : Hola. ¿Tiene una reserva? - Do you have a reservation?
  • Client : Sí/no tengo una reserva. - Yes, I have/No, I don’t have a reservation
  • Renter : ¿Para cuántos días / cuántas semanas? - For how many days/weeks?
  • Client : Para ____ días/semanas. - For ____ days/weeks.

Did you know that the word ‘car’ in Spanish can be said in many different ways depending on the country you’re in? Here you have a few examples. 

Types of Cars:

Car information:.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-car-4.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y” ¿El  coche  es manual o automático? – Is the car manual or automatic?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¿El-coche-tiene-aire-acondicionado_.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿El  coche  tiene aire acondicionado? – Does the car have air conditioning?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-car-6.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está la rueda de repuesto? – Where is the spare tire?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/travel-at-car-7.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Qué tipo de gasolina utiliza? – What kind of fuel does it take?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¿Cuantos-litros-por-kilometro-consume-este-coche_.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuántos litros por kilómetro consume este coche?  –  How many miles/kilometers does this car get to the gallon/liter.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¿El-precio-incluye-el-seguro-y-el-kilometraje_.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿ El precio incluye el seguro y el kilometraje?  –  Does that price include insurance and mileage?

Returning the Car and Emergency Situations:

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/devolver-el-coche.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde y cuándo tengo que devolver el coche? – Where and when do I have to return the car.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/devolver-el-coche-con-el-deposito-lleno.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Tengo que devolver el coche con el depósito lleno? – Do I have to return the car with a full gas tank?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/llamar-en-caso-de-accidente-o-averia.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿A qué número tengo que llamar en caso de accidente o avería? – Is there anyone I can call in case of accident or breakdown

Useful Verbs:

Do you know how to order in a restaurant in Spanish? What would you say if the waiter only spoke Spanish? Or if he did not understand your language or was rude? Usually the waiters (camareros) don’t speak English or they don’t speak the language very well. So, we advise you to take a closer look at the Basic Spanish Vocabulary for Restaurants .  There you will find basic and important vocabulary. 

order in a restaurant in spanish

If you want to book your accommodation the old fashioned way, with a phone conversation, you can use these phrases. Keep in mind that you can write down all your requests in the reservation form on the hotel’s website.

Here you will find useful phrases for booking a room in Spanish .

The phrases you might use while checking-in :

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-1.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Hola, tengo una habitación reservada.  – Hi, I have a reserved room.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Me gustaría hacer el check-in. – I’d like to do the check-in.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-3.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Está lista la habitación? – Is the room ready?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-4.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde puedo dejar mis maletas? – Where can I leave my luggage?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-5.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde puedo aparcar el coche?   – Where can I park my car?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-6-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿En qué planta/piso está la habitación? – On which floor is the room?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-7.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿A qué hora es el desayuno? – What time is breakfast?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-8.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Cuál es el horario de la piscina? – What are the swimming pool hours?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/Quiero-pagar-la-habitacion.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Quiero pagar la habitación. – I’d like to do the payment for the room.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-10.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Puedo pagar con tarjeta? – Can I pay by card? 

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/spanish-efectivo.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Puedo pagar en efectivo? – Can I pay in cash? 

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Hotel-12.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Puede llamar un taxi, por favor?   – Can you please call me a taxi?

For booking a hotel room, describing a place or an object in Spanish, we created a podcast episode that you can listen to and enhance your vocabulary and grammar skills.

On Vacation in Spain: Listen to Our Podcast!

Basic spanish directions.

This section will help you navigate through the streets of Mexico City, Barcelona or a little village of Peru.

Check out our detailed blog post about Useful Spanish Directions!

directions-in-spanish

Asking for directions:

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/Disculpa_Perdona-¿la-plaza-Mayor_.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Disculpa/Perdona, ¿la plaza Mayor?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/Busco-la-estacion-de-metro-mas-cercana.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Busco la estación de metro más cercana. – I’m looking for the closest metro station.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Directions-3-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Estoy buscando un cajero automático. – I’m looking for an ATM.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Directions-4-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Dónde está el Museo de Arte Moderno? – Where is the Museum of Modern Art?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Directions-5-.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Hay un hospital cerca de aquí/por aquí cerca? – Is there a hospital around here?

Receiving directions:​​

adverbials of place

Remember! If you don’t understand something, ask the person to repeat: ¿Cómo? (How?) . Usually Spanish people speak fast so you might need to slow them down a bit – just say:  ¡Despacio, por favor! Slowly, please!

Essential Phrases in Spanish for Emergencies

Hopefully, you won’t need this part of our blog post, but it’s important that you know some basic phrases in case you need help!

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Emergencies-1.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Puedes ayudarme? – Can you help me?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Emergencies-2.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Necesito ayuda . – I need help.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Emergencies-3.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Estoy perdido . – I’m lost.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¡Llama-a-la-policia-.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¡Llama a la policía! – Call the police!

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¡Llama-a-una-ambulancia.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¡Llama a una ambulancia!   – Call an ambulance!

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Emergencies-6.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¡Ten cuidado! – Be careful!

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Emergencies-7.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Ha habido un accidente. – There’s been an accident.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/¡Por-favor-rapido.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¡Por favor, rápido!  – Please hurry!

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Emergencies-9.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] ¿Estás bien?  – Are you OK?

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Emergencies-10.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Me han robado. – I’ve been robbed.

[mp3j track=”https://letsspeakspanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Emergencies-11-.mp3″ title=”” ind=”n” volslider=”n” flow=”y”] Me han atacado.  – I’ve been attacked.

The Most Commonly Used Verbs

In this part you can refresh or learn new Spanish  verbs for traveling .  

Best Apps for Traveling in Spain

maps.me spanish app

1. Maps.me – a perfect alternative to any online maps. Before going to your destination, download an offline map and you will never get lost. You can also search for restaurants, supermarkets, and cultural landmarks without being connected to the internet. 

cabify spanish app

2. Cabify – it’s like Uber but a Spanish version.

triposo spanish app

3. Triposo – a different kind of a TripAdvisor. It’s more user friendly and it has a lot of information about any destination. Create bucket lists and add favorite places. You can also find mini-guides gathered by the  community.

spanishdict spanish app

4. Spanish Dict – although Google Translate is an excellent tool, we suggest this app for traveling through Spanish-speaking countries.

el tenedor spanish app

5. El Tenedor (The Fork) – the app has information about over 30,000 restaurants in Spain. You can discover what is around your location, choose the preferred cuisine and book a table. You can see the full menu in an app, which is handy. The app also offers discounts and some great deals.

idealista logo

6. Idealista – website and app for finding accommodation for longer periods. It offers apartments and houses to rent or buy.

wallapop-logo

7. Wallapop – similar to eBay, but in Spain. You can sell or buy stuff through the website or the app.

We hope this blog post answered many of your questions. Now, you’re ready for your adventure in Spain or South America. If you’re interested in more educational blog posts, visit our Learner’s Blog or check the FREE options to learn Spanish. 

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131 Useful Spanish Travel Phrases Every Traveler Should Learn

Have you been dreaming about your upcoming vacation to Spain?

Eagerly awaiting your backpacking trek through South America?

Whatever the case, your trip to any Spanish-speaking country will be so much more fun and meaningful if you can communicate with locals .

But what kind of Spanish travel phrases do you even need to know?

Below are the essentials— the most common Spanish phrases for travel  to help you upgrade your trip from “goodw” to “great.”

1. Basic Spanish Greetings and Phrases

2. basic spanish phrases for everyday use, 3. asking for directions in spanish, 4. spanish travel phrases for the hotel, 5. spanish travel phrases for the restaurant, 6. spanish phrases for the airport and ticket offices, 7. medical emergencies in spanish, 8. spanish phrases for having a bit of fun, and one more thing….

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

spanish travel phrases

Spanish-speaking countries are generally very polite and you must always be courteous and say “hello” and “how are you?”

Don’t worry about making mistakes. Most people will try their utmost to understand you and to make sure you understand them. Try your best and they will be happy to reciprocate!

  • Buenos días — Good morning
  • Buenas tardes — Good afternoon
  • Buenas noches — Good evening
  • ¿Cómo te llamas? — What’s your name? (informal)
  • ¿Cómo se llama? — What’s your name? (formal)
  • Me llamo… — My name is…
  • Mucho gusto — Nice to meet you
  • ¿Cómo estás? — How are you? (informal)
  • ¿Cómo está? — How are you? (formal)
  • Bien, gracias — Good, thank you
  • Por favor — Please
  • Gracias — Thank you
  • Perdón — S orry
  • ¿Habla inglés? — Do you speak English?
  • No hablo español — I don’t speak Spanish

spanish travel phrases

You can go far with some very easy-to-remember travel phrases and words.

You’ll likely use “I want,” “I like” and “Do you have…?” quite often. If you don’t know the noun, you can simply point at the object or show a photo.

You can also say a lot of things with very simple verbs we’re about to introduce. It may not be the sophisticated way you speak in English, but you will be understood.

  • Quiero / No quiero  — I want / I don’t want
  • Me gustaría ; Quisiera — I would like (more polite)
  • ¿Dónde está…? — Where is…? Since  dónde ends in  e and  está  starts with one, these two words flow into each other, almost like they were a single word.
  • ¿Cuánto cuesta? — How much does it cost? 
  • ¿Qué hora es? — What time is it?
  • ¿Tiene…? — Do you have…?
  • Tengo / No tengo  — I have / I don’t have
  • Entiendo / No entiendo  — I understand / I don’t understand
  • ¿Entiende? — Do you understand?
  • Quiero un boleto — I want a ticket

…un hotel — …a hotel

…un taxi — …a taxi

  • No funciona — It doesn’t work

That last one is an all-purpose word . You can use this for a million circumstances! Just point at the shower or whatever and say “ ¡No funciona!”

What we’ve seen so far is basic survival Spanish, so even if you can only remember these words and phrases, they’ll still help a great deal.

spanish-travel-phrases-directions

If you get a bit lost or unsure of how to get somewhere, “¿dónde está?”  is the simplest way of asking for directions. Here are a few more phrases, locations and other directions in Spanish that will be helpful on your trip:

  • ¿Dónde está la estación de ferrocarril? — Where is the railway station?
  • ¿Dónde hay un restaurante? — Where is a restaurant?
  • Un tren — A train
  • La calle… — The street…
  • Un banco — A bank
  • El baño — The bathroom
  • Busco un hotel — I’m looking for a hotel
  • Necesito un hotel — I need a hotel

…un cuarto — …a room

…un cuarto con baño — …a room with a bathroom

  • ¿Dónde hay una casa de cambio? — Where is the currency exchange?
  • ¿Dónde está el banco? — Where is the bank?
  • Dinero — Money

Once you have asked a question, someone will answer you in Spanish. Listen for these key words:

  • A la derecha — To the right
  • A la izquierda — To the left
  • Derecho — Straight ahead
  • En la esquina — At the corner
  • A una cuadra — In one block

…dos cuadras — …two blocks

…tres cuadras — …three blocks

…cuatro cuadras — …four blocks

spanish travel phrases

You’ve finally found your hotel and you’re ready to check in!

Staff at international chains will probably be able to communicate in English with you, but these phrases and questions will come in handy for local hotels, hostels, bed and breakfasts, etc.

These will also be helpful when you need to make adjustments to your reservation or are curious about other hotel amenities.

  • Tengo una reserva a nombre de… — I have a reservation under the name of…
  • Estadía de tres noches — Three-night stay
  • Una habitación para dos personas — A room for two people
  • Una habitación con una cama de matrimonio — A room with a double bed As you can see, habitación is a synonym of cuarto . You can use either term when booking a room.
  • ¿Dónde está la piscina? — Where is the pool?
  • ¿A qué hora es el desayuno? — What time is breakfast?
  • ¿Puedo solicitar una salida tardía? — Can I request a late check-out?
  • ¿Tiene servicio de habitaciones? — Do you have room service?
  • ¿ Cuál es la contraseña de WiFi ? —  What is the WiFi password?
  • Una cama supletoria — An extra bed
  • Vista al mar — Ocean view
  • Vista a la ciudad — City view
  • Un balcón — A balcony
  • La terraza — The rooftop / terrace
  • El gimnasio — The gym
  • La playa — The beach
  • El vestíbulo — The lobby

spanish travel phrases

Probably the most useful travel phrases you will need are the ones you would use in a restaurant. Let’s go over some basic restaurant vocabulary in Spanish :

Ask for anything by using quiero  or quisiera  — “I want” or “I would like.” And remember to say  por favor  and  gracias!

  • Una mesa — A table
  • Una mesa para dos — A table for two

…tres — …three

…cuatro — …four

  • Un menú / Una carta — A menu
  • Sopa — Soup
  • Ensalada — Salad
  • Hamburguesa — Hamburger
  • Con salsa de tomate — With ketchup

…mostaza — …mustard

…tomate — …tomato

…lechuga — …lettuce

  • Una entrada — An appetizer
  • Un postre — Dessert
  • Una bebida — A drink
  • Agua — Water
  • Vino tinto / Vino blanco — Red wine / White wine
  • Cerveza — Beer
  • Un café — Coffee
  • ¡Señor! / ¡Señorita! — Mister / Miss (when calling a waiter or waitress)
  • La cuenta — The check
  • Una tarjeta de crédito — A credit card
  • Una tarjeta de débito — A debit card
  • Pagar en efectivo — Pay in cash

Note that many places in smaller towns still don’t take credit cards , so make sure you have enough cash with you.

You can ask if a place takes credit cards by using the noun with a question. For example, you can pull out your credit card and say: ¿Tarjeta de crédito? They will understand.

spanish-travel-phrases-tickets

It’s time to soak in some culture ! Whether you want to go see a show, check out an art exhibit, watch a local movie or visit the next town (or country) over, you’ll need to buy some sort of ticket.

We’ll start with some airport-specific vocabulary —bearing in mind that many of these phrases are versatile and can be used in various situations—followed by more general vocabulary. 

  • Su pasaporte, por favor — Your passport, please
  • Quisiera cambiar mi reserva — I would like to change my reservation
  • ¿Podría elegir mi asiento? — Could I choose my seat?
  • Quisiera cambiar mi asiento — I would like to change my seat
  • Este es mi equipaje de mano — This is my carry-on luggage
  • ¿Se ha cancelado el vuelo? — Has the flight been canceled?
  • ¿Dónde está la terminal internacional? — Where is the international terminal?
  • ¿Dónde está la puerta de embarque? — Where is the boarding gate?
  • ¿A qué hora es el embarque? — What time is boarding?

Earlier we defined entrada as an “appetizer.” Entrada has multiple meanings related to “start” or “entry,” so you can also use it to say “ticket.”

  • ¿Cuánto cuesta una entrada? — How much does a ticket cost?
  • Dos boletos de ida y vuelta — Two roundtrip tickets
  • ¿ Tiene un pase de un día ? — Do you have a one-day pass?
  • ¿A qué hora sale el próximo tren ? — What time does the next train leave?
  • ¿De qué plataforma sale? — Which platform does it leave from?
  • ¿Qué puerta? — Which gate?

For more specific situations, here are some words and phrases you might need when purchasing tickets:

  • El espectáculo — The show / performance
  • El teatro — The theater
  • La exposición — The exhibit
  • El cine — The cinema
  • Una película — A movie
  • Un vuelo — A flight
  • Viaje de ida — One-way trip
  • Viaje de ida y vuelta — Return trip / round trip
  • El asiento de pasillo — The aisle seat
  • El asiento de ventanilla — The window seat
  • La primera fila — The first row

La segunda fila — The second row

La tercera fila — The third row

La cuarta fila — The fourth row

Also, as you’ve likely noticed, for anything dealing with money or quantities, you’ll want to be familiar with numbers in Spanish .

spanish travel phrases

A smart traveler always comes prepared with some emergency over-the-counter meds. After all, you never know what could happen when you’re overseas.

But when those aren’t enough, these are the phrases that will help with your health-related concerns when in a Spanish-speaking country:

  • ¿Dónde está la farmacia? — Where is the pharmacy?
  • ¿Dónde está el hospital más cercano? — Where is the nearest hospital?
  • Seguro de salud internacional — International health insurance
  • No me siento bien — I feel sick / I don’t feel well
  • ¿El doctor habla inglés? — Does the doctor speak English?
  • ¿Necesito una receta? — Do I need a prescription?
  • ¿Qué medicina necesito? — What medicine do I need?
  • La cita médica — Doctor’s appointment
  • La cita de seguimiento — Follow-up appointment

If you need help explaining your symptoms, these terms will help you out. With the exception of the last phrase, start off by saying tengo , followed by any of the below:

  • Un resfriado — A cold
  • Dolor de garganta — Sore throat
  • Tos — Cough
  • Fiebre — Fever
  • Dolor de cabeza — Headache
  • Dolor de estómago — Stomachache
  • Dolor de espalda — Backache
  • Resaca — Hangover
  • Me gotea la nariz — I have a runny nose

people-dancing-in-a-bar

Of course, a trip to a Spanish-speaking country wouldn’t be complete without a little ¡fiesta! (carnival; party). If you’re keen to hit the town, here are a few phrases to help you get your groove on.

  • ¡Salud! — Cheers!
  • ¿Hay algún bar por aquí? — Is there a bar around here?
  • ¿Dónde están las discotecas? — Where are the clubs?
  • ¿A qué hora abren las discotecas? — What time do the clubs open?
  • ¿Me recomienda un lugar para bailar? — Can you recommend me a place to dance?
  • ¿Quieres bailar conmigo? — Do you want to dance with me?
  • ¡Bailemos! — Let’s dance!

Of course, to use all these phrases successfully, you’ll need to practice ! You can save and print this post as a PDF or even create your own flashcards. You can also use a program that creates flashcards for you, like the video-based FluentU .

Do you feel more prepared for your trip now? Pack these Spanish travel phrases with the rest of your essentials and you’ll be sure to get the most from your vacation!

If you've made it this far that means you probably enjoy learning Spanish with engaging material and will then love FluentU .

Other sites use scripted content. FluentU uses a natural approach that helps you ease into the Spanish language and culture over time. You’ll learn Spanish as it’s actually spoken by real people.

FluentU has a wide variety of videos, as you can see here:

learn-spanish-with-videos

FluentU brings native videos within reach with interactive transcripts. You can tap on any word to look it up instantly. Every definition has examples that have been written to help you understand how the word is used. If you see an interesting word you don’t know, you can add it to a vocab list.

learn-spanish-with-interactive-subtitled-videos

Review a complete interactive transcript under the Dialogue tab, and find words and phrases listed under Vocab .

learn-spanish-with-songs

Learn all the vocabulary in any video with FluentU’s robust learning engine. Swipe left or right to see more examples of the word you’re on.

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The best part is that FluentU keeps track of the vocabulary that you’re learning, and gives you extra practice with difficult words. It'll even remind you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. Every learner has a truly personalized experience, even if they’re learning with the same video.

Start using the FluentU website on your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or Google Play store. Click here to take advantage of our current sale! (Expires at the end of this month.)

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travel words in spanish list

Seeing in Spanish plain logo

Travel Spanish: 70+ Essential Phrases for Your Trip

Updated on January 28, 2024 by Lou Mac

So you’re planning to visit a Spanish-speaking country (woohoo!). But how much language prep have you done for your trip?

Knowing basic travel Spanish is essential for any trip: for communicating with locals to find the best restaurants, asking for directions, and perhaps most importantly, in any emergency situation.

So, we’ve compiled this list of Spanish words and phrases that will be useful for when you immerse yourself in Hispanic culture.

If you’re unsure about the pronunciation of these phrases, this guide to Spanish pronunciation will help you understand all the basics!

Essential Travel Spanish Basics

The city of Santiago de Chile South America

The following words and phrases are worth going over and over until you can say them pretty much automatically, as they will be some of the basic building blocks to your Spanish knowledge.

  • Hablo español / No hablo español . — I speak Spanish / I don’t speak Spanish.
  • ¿Tiene…? — Do you have…?
  • Tengo… no tengo… — I have… I don’t have…
  • Entiendo, no entiendo — I understand, I don’t understand
  • ¿Entiende? — Do you understand?
  • Quiero, no quiero — I want…, I don’t want… E.g. quiero un boleto, un taxi, un hotel — I want a ticket, a taxi, a hotel…
  • Me gustaría, no me gustaría… — I would like…, I wouldn’t like… (This one is more polite)
  • ¿Dónde está…? — Where is… ?
  • ¿Cuánto cuesta? — How much does it cost?
  • ¿Qué hora es? — What time is it?

How to Ask for Directions in Spanish

A busy crossing in Santiago de Chile

Learning how to ask for directions is perhaps not as essential as it was twenty years ago, before the development of the internet and Google Maps.

However, if you find yourself in a situation where you can’t use your cellphone (which can easily happen!), you should know the basic Spanish phrases and vocabulary for finding your way around.

  • ¿Dónde está…? — Where is the…?
  • ¿ Cómo llego al centro? — How do I get to the centre/downtown?
  • ¿Hay un restaurante bueno por aquí? — Is there a good restaurant around here?
  • Busco un hotel/hostal — I’m looking for a hotel/hostal

With the phrases above you can ask for directions to other places, such as the bank, a bathroom etc. Here is some useful vocabulary to substitute into these phrases:

  • El baño — the bathroom
  • Un tren — a train
  • La calle — the street
  • Un cajero automático — an ATM

And lastly some practical vocab to help you understand the helpful directions people give you:

  • A la derecha — to the right
  • A la izquierda — to the left
  • Derecho — straight ahead
  • Una cuadra — a block
  • Sigue… — keep going…

How to Ask for Help in Spanish

ambulance in santiago de chile

While there are many things you must learn if you want to speak Spanish, knowing how to ask for help is key to surviving in a Spanish-speaking country.

A few phrases or words will make things much easier if an emergency occurs or you are in trouble, including the following:

Note: These examples use the “formal” way of speaking to people.

  • ¿Puede ayudarme? — Can you help me?
  • ¡Ayuda! — Help!
  • Necesito ayuda — I need help
  • ¡Llame a la policía! — Call the police!
  • ¡Llame a la ambulancia! — Call the ambulance!
  • Ayúdeme, por favor . — Help me, please
  • ¿Podría ayudarme, por favor? — Could you help me, please?
  • ¿Podría explicarlo, por favor? — Can you explain it to me, please?
  • ¿Cómo se escribe…? — How do you write…?
  • ¿Cómo se dice…? — How do you say…?

Spanish for Medical Emergencies

hospital waiting room in spanish-speaking country

It’s also important to know words in Spanish that can help us deal with a medical emergency.

  • No me siento bien — I don’t feel well
  • ¿Dónde está el hospital más cercano? — Where is the nearest hospital?
  • ¿Puede llamar a la ambulancia? — Can you call the ambulance?
  • ¿Dónde está la farmacia? — Where is the drugstore/pharmacy?
  • ¿El doctor habla inglés? — Does the doctor speak English?
  • ¿Necesito medicinas? — Do I need medication?
  • ¿Qué medicina necesito? — What medicine do I need?
  • Tengo un seguro de salud internacional — I have international health insurance

Navigating Your Accommodation in Spanish

hostel bedroom in santiago

Once you’ve found the perfect place to stay, here’s how to get yourself checked in and comfortable:

  • Tengo una reserva a nombre de Harry Potter — I have a reservation under the name Harry Potter
  • Necesito un hotel / un cuarto / un cuarto con baño — I need a hotel / a room / a room with a bathroom
  • Me gustaría quedarme por dos noches — I would like to stay for two nights
  • ¿Tiene una habitación doble? — Do you have a double room?
  • ¿Dónde está la piscina / gimnasio? — Where is the pool/gym?
  • ¿A qué hora es el desayuno? — What time is breakfast?
  • ¿Cuál es la contraseña de WiFi? — What is the WiFi password?

Essential Spanish for Eating Out

fancy dinner in santiago de chile

The most important travel Spanish phrases to add to your mental toolbox are those surrounding eating out—either because we are hungry (obviously) or we want to experience the wonderful local gastronomy.

This list of expressions and words could save your life (well, your stomach) on your next adventure in a Spanish-speaking country.

In addition to the vocabulary below, a useful resource are these scenario podcast episodes we did about ordering vegetarian food in Spanish , and ordering coffee in Spanish .

To make things easier, we have divided these restaurant-related words and phrases into several categories. Check them out below:

When Arriving or Booking a Table

  • Quisiera reservar una mesa — I would like to book a table
  • Quisiera reservar una mesa para dos — I would like to book a table for two
  • ¿Tiene alguna mesa disponible? — Is there any available table?
  • Tengo una mesa reservada a nombre de Hermione Granger — I have booked a table under the name of Hermione Granger

When Ordering

  • ¡Camarero / garzón! — Waiter !
  • ¿Podría traerme el menú, por favor? — Could you bring me the menu, please?
  • ¿Qué me recomienda? — What do you recommend?
  • ¿Podría recomendarme un plato local, por favor? — Can you recommend me a local dish, please?
  • Para beber, me gustaría… — To drink, I would like…
  • Como entrada, me gustaría.. . — As a starter, I would like …
  • Como plato principal, me gustaría… — For the main course, I would like…
  • De postre, me gustaría… — For dessert, I would like…

During the Meal

  • Perdone, ¿podría traerme…? — Excuse me, could you bring me…?
  • Perdone, ¿podría traerme más servilletas? — Excuse me, could you bring me some more napkins?
  • Perdone, ¿podría traerme otra copa de vino ? Excuse me, could you bring me another glass of wine? (learn this one by heart 🍷)
  • La comida está muy rica . — The food is delicious
  • La carne está demasiado hecha — The meat is overcooked
  • La carne está poco hecha — The meat is undercooked

When Paying and Leaving

  • La cuenta, por favor — The bill, please
  • Estaba todo muy rico, gracias — Everything was very tasty, thanks
  • Quisiera pagar con tarjeta — I’d like to pay by card
  • Quisiera pagar en efectivo — I’d like to pay in cash
  • Creo que hay un error — I think there’s a mistake

Lastly, if you’re a foodie like me, you might want to know some food recommendations. Click here to learn about the different foods you must try if you’re visiting Chile!

Resources to Learn More Travel Spanish

Packing for a trip to South America

If you’ve decided you want to know a bit more than just the survival Spanish, here are a few resources to kick-start your Spanish journey.

  • Seeing in Spanish Podcast. Our own language learning and travel podcast aims at helping you self-learn Spanish to make your travels unforgettable. To start, check out this episode on how to learn Spanish on your own .
  • Duolingo. I think it’s safe to assume you know what Duolingo is! While it often gets a bad rap, it’s all about how you use Duolingo which makes the difference!
  • YouTube Videos. Videos such as this video on top 20 travel Spanish phrases you should know are a great way to hear how phrases we learnt in this article are actually pronounced.

It’s also worth remembering that Spanish changes depending on what country you’re in, so you might also want to consider learning a specific Spanish dialect.

With these survival Spanish words and phrases, your next trip will be much easier and more memorable.

Now you can move on to getting excited for your adventure!

Speak Better Spanish

A Useful Guide to Spanish Travel Phrases

spanish travel vocab

Written by Diana Luciana

August 25, 2022.

Are you planning a long-awaited trip to a Spanish-speaking country? 🌎

Your trip can be so much more fun and meaningful if you know how to say travel in Spanish, and communicate with the locals—how many times have you missed out on a secret spot because you didn’t speak the language?—and find your way around with this guide to Spanish travel phrases and words. From getting to the airport to ordering food in Spanish at the restaurant, we got you covered.

How do you say travel in Spanish?

We put together a list of essential Spanish travel phrases, need-to-know vocabulary, and tips for traveling in Spanish. Keep in mind that you don’t need to speak Spanish fluently to get the most out of your trip and have meaningful interactions. A basic travel Spanish vocabulary will get you a long way, and the locals would definitely appreciate the effort. And when you don’t understand or aren’t sure of what’s being said, simply ask ¿Habla inglés? (Do you speak English?)

Key phrases in Spanish for travelers

Here are some key Spanish phrases and greetings you should know. You can use them in any situation (asking for directions in Spanish, asking questions in Spanish, meeting new people in Spanish, and so on.) It’s a mini Spanish 101 lesson:

Spanish greetings

  • Buenos días   — Good morning
  • Buenas tardes   — Good afternoon
  • Buenas noches   — Good evening
  • ¿Cómo te llamas?  — What’s your name?
  • Me llamo…   — My name is…
  • Mucho gusto. Encantado — It’s a pleasure to meet you.
  • ¿Cómo te va? / ¿Qué tal? / ¿Qué hay?  — How’s it going?
  • ¿Cómo estás?   — How are you?
  • Bien, gracias / Muy bien, gracia s — Good, thank you / Very well, thank you
  • Por favor   — Please
  • Perdón / Lo siento — Sorry
  • ¿Habla inglés?   — Do you speak English?
  • No hablo español.  — I don’t speak Spanish.
  • No entiendo bien el español. — I don’t understand Spanish well. 
  • ¿Tiene…?  — Do you have…?
  • ¿Entiende?  — Do you understand?
  • Yo entiendo / yo no entiendo  — I understand / I don’t understand
  • Hágame el favor de hablar más despacio. — Speak more slowly, please. 
  • Escríbalo, por favor. — Write it down, please.

Essential Spanish

  • ¿Dónde está…? ¿Dónde están…? — Where is…? Where are…?
  • ¿Por dónde se va a…? / ¿Cómo puedo llegar a…? — How do you go to…? 
  • ¿Dónde estamos aquí en el mapa? — Where are we on the map?
  • ¿Está lejos? ¿Está por aquí? — Is it far away? Is it near here?
  • Busco… — I’m looking for…
  • ¿Me podría ayudar?  — Can you help me?
  • Estoy perdido  (for men) / perdida  (for women) . — I’m lost.
  • ¿Hay alguien que hable inglés? — Is there anyone who speaks English? 
  • Disculpe / Con permiso / Perdóname — Excuse me
  • ¿Quién?   — Who?
  • ¿Qué?   — What?
  • ¿Cuándo?   — When?
  • ¿Cómo?   — How?
  • ¿Cuánto?   — How much?
  • ¿Cuántos?   — How many?
  • ¿Por qué?   — Why?
  • ¿A qué hora?   — What time?
  • ¿Por cuánto tiempo?   — How long?
  • ¿Cada cuánto?   — How often?
  • Yo quiero / yo no quiero  — I want / I don’t want
  • Yo tengo / yo no tengo  — I have / I don’t have

How to say airport in Spanish

Imagine yourself getting off the plane ( el avión )—new place, new language, new everything—ready to start your vacation. Even though English is widely spoken, knowing the basic Spanish travel vocabulary for airports and planes will make your trip easier. And you will start your vacation on the right foot, confident that you can find your way in any situation.

Essential travel vocabulary in Spanish for when you are at the airport ( el aeropuerto ):

Spanish travel vocabulary

Airport-specific vocabulary in Spanish

  • la aduana  — customs
  • la aerolínea  / la linea aerea   — airline
  • el asiento  — seat
  • el auxiliar de vuelo, la azafata  — flight attendant
  • el baño  — bathroom
  • el boleto  — ticket
  • confirmar una reservación   — to confirm a reservation
  • el destino  —  destination
  • el equipaje  — luggage
  • el horario, el itinerario   — schedule
  • la maleta  — suitcase
  • el pasajero, la pasajera  —  passenger
  • el pasaporte  —  passport
  • el regreso  —  return
  • la salida  —  departure, exit
  • la tarifa  —  price
  • la tienda libre de impuestos   — duty-free shop
  • el viaje  — journey, trip
  • el vuelo  —  flight, wing

Spanish travel phrases

Useful phrases at the airport in Spanish

  • ¿Cuándo sale el avión?  — When does the plane leave?
  • Mi vuelo es a las … en punto. — My flight is at … o’clock.
  • ¿A qué hora es el embarque?  — What time is boarding?
  • ¿Cuándo llega el avión?  — When does the plane arrive?
  • Quisiera cambiar mi reserva / asiento.   — I would like to change my reservation / seat.
  • Querría anular mi reserva.   — I would like to cancel my reservation.
  • Necesitamos ayuda para subir al avión.   — We need help to get on the plane.
  • ¿Podría elegir mi asiento?  — Could I choose my seat?
  • Este es mi equipaje de mano . — This is my carry-on luggage.
  • ¿Se ha cancelado el vuelo?   — Has the flight been canceled?
  • ¿Dónde está la terminal internacional / a puerta de embarque ?  — Where is the international terminal / boarding gate?
  • ¿Dónde puedo cambiar dinero? — Where is there a currency exchange desk?
  • ¿Dónde está el baño? — Where is the bathroom?

How to ask for directions in Spanish

You are finally in the city, ready to explore! Next on the list is learning how to ask for directions in Spanish. In this section, we’ll also cover the topic of transportation and finding a hotel in Spanish, and show you the most common travel phrases. Let’s delve into it:

  • ¿Dónde está la estación de ferrocarril?  — Where is the railway station?
  • ¿A qué hora sale el tren?   — What time does the train leave?
  • ¿A qué hora sale el próximo tren?  — What time does the next train leave?
  • ¿De qué plataforma sale?  — Which platform does it leave from?
  • ¿Dónde puedo tomar un taxi / un autobús? (Latin America) /  ¿Dónde puedo coger un taxi / un autobús? (Spain) — Where can I catch a taxi / a bus?
  • ¿Tiene un pase de un día?  — Do you have a one-day pass?
  • ¿Cuánto cuesta un billete al aeropuerto?   — How much is a ticket to the airport?
  • ¿Cómo llego a…?   — How do I get to … ?
  • Gira a la izquierda/derecha.   — Turn left/right.
  • ¿Dónde hay un supermercado?   — ¿Where is there a supermarket?
  • ¿Dónde hay una casa de cambio?   — Where is the currency exchange?
  • ¿Dónde está el banco?  — Where is the bank?
  • ¡Disculpe! Soy turista y estoy perdido/a.  — Excuse me! I am a tourist and I am lost.
  • ¿Dónde hay un restaurante?  — Where is a restaurant?
  • Me podrías recomendar un restaurante?   — Do you have any restaurant recommendations?

12 Spanish travel phrases for the hotel

  • Busco un hotel . — I’m looking for a hotel.
  • Yo necesito un hotel / un cuarto / un cuarto con baño.  — I need a hotel / a room / a room with a bathroom.
  • Una habitación para dos personas . — A room for two people.
  • Yo tengo una reserva a nombre de…  — I have a reservation under the name of…
  • He reservado una habitación.  — I have booked a room.
  • ¿Puedes darme la llave de mi habitación?  — Can you give me the key to my room?
  • ¿Cuándo es la hora límite de salida?   — When is check-out time?
  • ¿Puedo solicitar una salida tardía?  — Can I request for late check-out?
  • ¿Cuál es la contraseña de Wifi?  — What is the Wifi password?
  • ¿Tiene servicio de habitaciones?  — Do you have room service?
  • ¿A qué hora es el desayuno?  — What time is breakfast?
  • Esta habitación es demasiado ruidosa.   — This room is too noisy.

How to order food in Spanish

After a long day of walking and exploring, it’s time to take a break and have a bite. Maybe try out the local Spanish cuisine. Whether you are ordering food or drinks, these phrases will come in handy. And if you want to learn more about how to say food in Spanish, check out this post . (You also have an entire section about ordering food in Spanish.) Start with these phrases:

  • Una mesa para… dos, tres, cuatro . — A table for… two, three, four.
  • ¿Cuál es el menú de hoy? — What is today’s menu?
  • Me gustaría probar la especialidad del cocinero.  — I would like to try the chef’s specialty.
  • ¿Qué me recomienda? — What do you recommend?
  • Me gustaría algo de postre.   — I would like some dessert.
  • La cuenta, por favor. – The check, please.
  • ¿Acepta tarjeta de crédito? — Do you accept credit card?
  • Tengo alergia a … — I am allergic to…
  • Soy alérgico. — I’m allergic.
  • Soy vegetariano/a. — I’m a vegetarian.

Now you’re all set for your Spanish travels! I hope this guide will enhance your travel experience, and that you will enjoy speaking Spanish—from asking for directions to ordering breakfast at the local cafe. If you want more free Spanish lessons , check out my YouTube channel and blog .

What’s your favorite travel destination? ✈️🧳 Drop your answer in the comments.

P.S. Do you know how to say safe travels in Spanish? Learn 3 ways you can say safe travels in Spanish: Te deseo que tengas un buen viaje (I wish you safe travels), Ojalá que tengas un buen viaje (I hope you have a good trip) and the formal option of Le deseo que tenga un buen viaje (I hope you have a good trip.) Now you know how to say safe travels in Spanish.

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Spanish for Travelers: Spanish Travel Vocab & Resources

travel words in spanish list

Viajar is the Spanish word for ‘travel’. If you’re planning a trip to a Spanish-speaking country, you should learn some basic expressions and words that can help you get along in different situations. 

On this page, I’ve gathered some of our best resources to make your travels easier and more enjoyable. From essential travel phrases to ordering food and drinks, these guides are designed to make your interactions with locals easy and stress free. 

Let’s jump right in! 

  • 91 Top Spanish Travel Phrases & Words for Tourists : Get familiar with these essential Spanish phrases to navigate different situations you may encounter in your trips. From being at the airport to shopping and more. I’ve seen courses where people pay for the exact same information in this guide. Save that for your trip and read this instead!
  • How to Ask for & Reserve a Hotel Room in Spanish : Check this guide to learn expressions and vocabulary related to hotel accommodations. Everything travelers need to book a hotel room from the Spanish phrases to use to reserve a room to talking about dates and more.
  • The Ultimate Guide on How to Order Food : If you’re traveling to Spain or a Spanish-speaking country in Latin America, you’re likely to try the local food. In this guide, you’ll find the key Spanish phrases, questions and words you need to order dishes at restaurants you visit while you travel.
  • A Vegetarian and Vegan’s Guide to Ordering Food : This guide will give you the Spanish vocabulary you need to help you navigate menus and order delicious vegetarian and vegan meals with confidence. It includes the specific words you’ll need to ask if dishes adhere to your diet.
  • The Complete Guide on Ordering and Asking for Drinks in Spanish : Enjoy your favorite beverages and connect with locals using this step-by-step guide on ordering and inquiring about drinks in Spanish. 

Additional Spanish Resources to Speak When Traveling

The guides listed above are enough to help you communicate during your trips. If you want to take your conversational skills further, you can also learn some common greetings in Spanish . Also, adding some basic nouns and essential verbs to your vocabulary can help you express your ideas more effectively. 

¡Buen viaje!

Daniela Sanchez

¡Hola! Soy Daniela Sanchez, I've been studying Spanish professionally as well as teaching it in Mexico and online for over 10 years. I’ve taught Spanish to a wide array of foreigners from many backgrounds. Over the years, I've made it my mission to work hard on refining many challenging to understand grammar topics to make my students' learning experiences easier, faster and more enjoyable. Read More About Me

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50 Essential Spanish Phrases for Travelers

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January 10, 2018

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Your bags are packed and everything’s all set. But wait--before you leave for a Spanish-speaking destination, make sure you’re armed and ready with this list of the very basic Spanish travel phrases.

Just a few essential phrases are enough to tide you over during your trip, so make sure to have this list handy or better yet, memorize them! Don’t worry, it’s super easy, and the pronunciation won’t trip you up at all.

Spanish Phrases for Travelers

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You can also download this list in a printer-friendly PDF version. Simply click the download button below.

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Common Spanish Travel Phrases

Essential Spanish Phrases for Travelers

there you have it---your list of the most common Spanish travel phrases. 

You can also read some related articles here:

[Quiz] Do you know these common Spanish phrases?

50 Common Spanish Phrases

For a more complete list of Spanish phrases, grab your copy of the Spanish Phrasebook by My Daily Spanish! It’s got all the phrases you need to survive---and even thrive---in a Spanish-speaking environment.

Make your travel hassle-free with this e-book that covers all possible scenarios while traveling in a Spanish-speaking country. Check it out below!

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About the author 

Janey is a fan of different languages and studied Spanish, German, Mandarin, and Japanese in college. She has now added French into the mix, though English will always be her first love. She loves reading anything (including product labels).

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105 Spanish Travel Phrases To Know For Your Next Trip

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Traveling to a Spanish speaking country without knowing at least a few Spanish travel phrases is a bad idea.

Even the simplest of situations can become an ordeal, whether it’s understanding directions, ordering food in a restaurant, or if worse comes to worst, handling an emergency situation.

That’s not to say that you won’t have a good trip – just that it’s more likely to come with added stress when you can’t speak the local language.

On the flip side, you don’t need to speak perfectly fluent Spanish in order to communicate.

Learning even a couple of basic Spanish travel phrases and words will go a long way in preparing you for most scenarios you’ll encounter when traveling.

Not to mention automatically be treated better by the locals who’ll appreciate the effort you’re making to speak their language.

Plus, nobody wants to be “that tourist ” who makes zero effort to speak Spanish, and is resigned to speaking painfully slow English and using excessive pointing as a last resort to be understood.

We put together a list of useful Spanish travel phrases and vocabulary for people who find themselves in a Spanish speaking environment and quickly need to learn survival Spanish.

Below, you’ll find vocab and native audio pronunciations for:

  • Basic phrases

Getting around

  • Understanding directions
  • Ordering food in a restuarant
  • Dealing with an emergency
  • Question words
  • Telling the time

travel words in spanish list

Basic Spanish Phrases

Hola – Hello

Buenos días – Good day/Good morning

Buenas tardes – Good afternoon

Buenas noches – Goodnight

¿Cómo estás? – How are you?

Por favor – Please

Gracias – Thank you

Me llamo… – My name is…

¿Habla inglés? – Do you speak English?

No hablo español – I don’t speak Spanish

¿Cómo se llama? – What is your name?

Disculpe – Excuse me/I’m sorry

No sé – I don’t know

¿Cómo se dice? – How do you say this?

No entiendo – I don’t understand

¿Qué hora es? – What time is it?

Hable más lento – Speak slowly

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Download the expanded guide to read later

This page gives you a great overview of the most important concepts and strategies, but for the full, expanded guide, click the button below:

These are likely to be your go-to Spanish travel phrases when getting around. Even when you don’t know the Spanish for the subject, these phrases can be combined with gentle pointing, and still come across as very polite.

Me gustaría – I would like

Quiero – I want

Necesito – I need

¿Dónde queda? – Where is?

¿Cuánto cuesta?– How much does it cost?

¿Qué precio tiene? – How much does it cost?

¿Tiene..? – Do you have..?

Yo tengo- I have

Yo no tengo – I don’t have

Qué significa (subject)…? – What does…(subject).. mean?

¿Como llego a..? – How do I get to…?

You’ll want explore your new surroundings, so best to memorize the Spanish for some key places.

El aeropuerto – Airport

El banco – Bank

La biblioteca  – Library

La cafetería – Café

El hotel – Hotel

El terminal – Terminal

La estación de bomberos – Firestation

La estación de ferrocarril – Railway station

El estadio – stadium

La farmacia – Pharmacy

La gasolinera – Petrol station

El hospital – Hospital

La librería – Bookshop

El mercado – Market

El museo – Museum

La parada – Bus stop

La policía – Police station

El restaurante – Restaurant

La tienda – Shop, store.

El Centro Comercial – shopping centre

Understanding Directions in Spanish

Understanding directions in a different language is always a challenge, but knowing a couple of these key phrases will help you if the situation calls for it. Either that, or you’ll end up with a general idea of where you need to go.

¿Entiende? – Do you understand?

A la derecha – To the right

A la izquierda – To the left

Derecho – Straight ahead

En la esquina – At the corner

A una cuadra – One block away

Hacia el Norte/Sur/Este/Oeste – To the North/South/East/West

Small talk is an essential part of everyday life, and Spanish speaking countries are no different.

Use these Spanish phrases to break the ice when you meet a local.

¿Cómo te va? – How’s it going?

¿Cómo te ha ido? – How’ve you been?

Estoy bien ¡Gracias! – I’m fine, thanks

¿Y tú? – And you?

Bien/Más o menos. – Good/So-so

¿Qué tal? – How are you?

¿Qué pasa? – What’s happening?

¿Qué haces? – What are you doing?

Ordering Food In Spanish

For obvious reasons, it’s always a good idea to be polite to your waiter in a restaurant.

¿Me trae…? – Could I have …?

¿Cuál es el menú de hoy? – What is today’s menu?

¿Qué me recomienda? – What do you recommend?

¿Acepta tarjeta de crédito? – Do you accept credit card?

La cuenta, por favor – Check, please

Soy alérgico – I’m allergic

Soy vegetariano – I’m vegetarian

Emergency Spanish

Knowing a couple of key emergency phrases will make things much easier if worst case scenario happens, and you find yourself in trouble.

¿Puede ayudarme? – Can you help me?

Necesito ayuda – I need help

¡Ayuda! – Help!

Estoy perdido – I’m lost

¡Llame a la policia! – Call the police!

¡Llame una ambulancia!  – Call an ambulance!

Quiz: Places, Directions, and Emergency

Before we move on, why don’t you see how much you remember from these three sections by watching this quiz video. You’ll be shown a selection of Spanish travel phrases and given a few moments to think of its English equivalent before we reveal the translation. Good luck!

travel words in spanish list

Question Words In Spanish

Just like the “Getting Around” phrases, these Spanish question words will be useful even when you don’t know how to say the subject of the sentence in Spanish.

¿Qué…? – what?

¿Cómo…? – how?

¿Cuándo…? – when?

¿Dónde…? – where?

¿Quién…? – who?

¿Por qué…? – why?

¿Cuál? – which?

¿Qué quieres hacer hoy? – What do you want to do today?

¿Como te sientes? – How are you feeling?

¿Cuándo vienes de nuevo? – When are you coming back?

¿Dónde está el museo? – Where is the museum?

¿Quién es? – Who is it?

¿Por qué quiere visitar este país? – Why do you want to visit this country?

¿Cuál prefieres? – Which one do you prefer?

Telling The Time

While almost everyone who travels has a smartphone these days, it’s still useful to know how to ask a stranger for the time, even if it’s only a tactic to break the ice and start a proper conversation.

¿Puede decirme la hora? – Can you tell me what time is it?

…En punto – O’ clock

…Y media/Y treinta –  …And a half

…Y un cuarto/Y quince – …Plus fifteen/quarter past

Faltan … para las … – It’s … until …

Medianoche – Midnight

Mediodía – Noon

Son las doce y treinta – It’s 12.30pm

Es la una y un cuarto – It’s 1.15pm

Faltan diez para las tres – It’s 2.50pm

Son las nueve de la mañana – It’s nine in the morning

Son las tres en punto – It’s three o’clock sharp.

Falta un cuarto para el mediodía – It’s quarter to midday

Related: If you want to learn more than these basics, then read our in-depth guide on how to tell the time in Spanish.

And that’s it.

Memorize these Spanish travel phrases before visiting a Spanish-speaking country for more comfortable, stress-free interactions in Spanish.

If you are serious about learning Spanish, then I recommend reading our 119-page Ultimate Guide to Spanish , which includes 10 principles behind learning Spanish fast, strategies to learn vocabulary and grammar, achieve perfect pronunciation and much more.

You can download the entire guide, for free, right below

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101 Common Spanish Phrases for Travel

Spanish Phrases for Travel

It’s time to travel! Are you going to a Spanish speaking country? These 101 common Spanish phrases for Travel will help your trip go smoothly, and your journey will be much more enjoyable. If you can memorize these phrases before your trip, that’ll be ideal. 

But let’s face it, you are busy. Most likely, you’ll be even busier as your departure date gets closer. But don’t worry, I have created this common Spanish phrases for travel pdf for you! It contains all the travel phrases and words that appear in this post.

Sign up to get your copy of our common Spanish travel phrases pdf for free!

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101 Common Travel Phrases in Spanish PDF

Be sure to download it right now so you’ll have it on your cell phone, tablet, or laptop when you are abroad. It’s always a good idea to have it saved on your device, just in case you don’t have access to the Internet when you need it. You can sign up below to get a link to download the basic common Spanish phrases for the travel pdf file sent to you.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. See our disclosure here .

What are the Common Spanish Phrases for Travel?

Here, we’ll cover 101 common Spanish phrases for travel that you will definitely want to know. 

First, let’s start with basic greetings and pleasantries, and move on to some of the very common and super useful Spanish verbs. Then we’ll talk about some Spanish travel phrases for getting around and shopping. 

Also, you’ll learn common Spanish phrases and words you will need at restaurants or hotels, and tourist activities. 

Lastly, we finish up with the important Spanish phrases for emergencies, just in case. So, let’s begin!

What are the Spanish words for travel?

First, what are the words for travel in Spanish? Below are the words that mean travel or a trip.

To travel – Viajar

To go on a trip – Ir de viaje

A trip – un viaje

Basic Spanish Phrases for Travel: Greetings and Pleasantries

When you are traveling to a Spanish-speaking country, learning some basic Spanish phrases goes a long way. Even if you don’t pronounce them correctly or make mistakes, most people would appreciate the time and effort you put into learning their language. So let’s start with some very basic Spanish phrases for travelers.

Hi – Hola

You can use this any time of the day as it means “Hi” or “Hello”, but people usually say this and then say one of the other greeting phrases below depending on the time of the day. So, for example, you might say, “Hola, Buenos días.”

Good morning

Buenos días

This is normally used in the morning hours before 12 noon.

Good afternoon

Buenas tardes

Then you would switch to “ buenas tardes ” in the afternoon until it gets dark outside.

Buenas noches

People would start saying “buenas noches” when it’s dark outside…maybe around 6pm-ish.

Good Bye – Adiós

A typical goodbye in any Spanish-speaking country in the world.

See you later.

Hasta luego.

Even though you may not be seeing each other for a long time or ever like a store clerk, it is common to say “hasta luego ” especially in Spain.

Excuse me (Can I have your attention?) / (Can I pass by?)

Discúlpe / Con permiso

So “ Discúlpe” is used to get someone’s attention. “ Con permiso ” basically means “with your permission.” You would say this when you walk in front of someone or need to pass by people in a crowded place because they are blocking your way. It’s like saying, “Excuse me, I’m passing by you.”

It’s always polite and good etiquette to say “please” in any country, right?

Don’t forget to show your gratitude and appreciation when someone did something nice for you.

No thank you

If you are not interested, you can politely decline by saying, “no gracias.”

What is your name? – ¿ C ó mo se llama usted?

This is a formal version and an informal version is “ ¿C ómo te llamas?” In Mexico or Latin America, it would be better to use the formal version. In Spain, the informal version is pretty common unless you are speaking to someone who is much older than you or a government official, doctor, police officer, etc., you get the idea. A general rule of thumb is if your conversation partner looks about your age or younger, then it’s safe to use the informal version.

My name is ________. – Me llamo ______.

This means literally, “I call myself _______.” You can also say “Soy + your name.”

Nice to meet you. – Mucho gusto (Mexico), Encantado/a (Spain)

In most Latin American countries, “mucho gusto” is the most common way to say “nice to meet you.” In Spain, if you are female, you would say “encantada” ; and if you are male, you would say “encantado.”

How are you? – ¿ C ó mo est á usted?

This is a formal way to ask how a person is. If you are talking to a friend or someone about your age or younger, you can say, “ ¿C ómo est ás?”

I’m good. – Estoy bien.

Just a simple “bien” would work as well. However, to be more polite, you can add “gracias,” so it’ll be “estoy bien, gracias” or “bien, gracias.”

Do you speak English? – ¿Habla inglés?

If you are asking this question to someone, you probably don’t know this person. So it would be appropriate to use this formal form. If you are asking a child or someone who is about your own age or younger, you can use an informal form and say, “ Hablas inglés? “

I don’t speak Spanish. – No hablo espa ñ ol.

Yes / No – Sí / No

I’m sure you’ve heard of these before. Yes!

Traveling soon? Don’t forget to check out this list of 75 Best Travel Accessories to see if you already have them! Many of them are Anti-Theft Products to help protect you and your belongings!

Can you speak slowly? – ¿ Puede hablar m á s despacio?

Natives seem to speak really fast when you first start learning a new language. So you can ask them to speak slowly.

Can you repeat it? – ¿Puede repetirlo?

You can also ask them to repeat what they have just said by saying this phrase.

I understand – Entiendo.

If you understand what they are saying, you can say “entiendo.” If not, you can say the following…

I don’t understand – No entiendo.

Well, if you don’t understand what they are saying, don’t just agree. Make sure you understand what they are saying by asking them to write it down. Once it’s written down, you can use Google to translate it!

Can you write it down, please? – ¿Puede escribirlo?

Yup, ask them to write it down or at least confirm by repeating what was said. You might want to keep a pen in your purse when traveling.

A little – un poco

You may hear other versions like “un poquito” or “un poquit ín” meaning a little tiny bit.

A lot – mucho

Also, you can use “un montón” meaning “A LOT!”

Nothing – Nada

Well, I have nothing to add…ha ha ha, sorry… (by the way, in Spanish, ha ha ha is written “ja ja ja”)

What time is it? – ¿Qu é hora son? (Mexico), ¿ Qu é hora es? (Spain)

For some reason, in Mexico, hora (hour) is used as a plural form, that’s why “son” is used instead of “es.”

Common Spanish Verbs for Travel: Need, Want, and Have

I need ________.

Necesito ________.

I don’t need _____.

No necesito _______.

I want ________.

Quiero_________.

I don’t want _______.

No quiero ________.

Do you have ______?

Tiene ______?

I have _______.

Tengo ________.

I don’t have _______.

No tengo ______.

Spanish Phrases for Transportation and Getting Around

Where is the bus stop? – ¿D ónde est á la parada de autob ús?

If you are looking for a bus station/terminal where many buses meet, you can use “Central de autobuses”, “Terminal de autobuses”, or “Estaci ón de Autobuses.” The last one is more common in Spain.

Do you go to downtown? – ¿Va al centro?

If you are unsure about which bus to take, you can always ask the bus driver if his/her bus goes to where you intend to go before you get on.

How do I get to the Museum of Natural History? – ¿C ómo llego al museo de histor ia natural?

You can use this phrase to ask for directions to some place.

Is it close? – ¿Est á cerca?

This is a bit tricky one because in most Spanish-speaking countries, people often tell you “it’s close,” but that doesn’t really mean it’s close! It could be, but you just never know how a person feels about a distance.

Is it far? – ¿Est á lejos?

If it’s far, you can also ask “ ¿Cu ánto tiempo se tarda en llegar allí?” – How long does it take to get there? to clarify how far it is.

What time does the train leave? – ¿A qu é hora sale el tren?

Whether it’s your train, bus, or flight, you can use this phrase to ask its departure time. The bus is “el autob ús” and the flight is “el vuelo.”

It leaves at 8:30 in the morning. – Sale a las ocho y media de la mañana.

More about the numbers a little bit further down. If it’s in the morning, “ de la mañana” and in the afternoon and early evening, “de la tarde.” And at night, “de la noche” and in the really early morning would be “de la madrugada.”

What time does it arrive? – ¿A qu é hora llega?

So this is referring to the transportation or a third person (he/she/it). What time do we arrive? Would be “ ¿A qu é hora llegamos?”

It arrives at 3 in the afternoon. – Llega a las tres de la tarde.

If you want to say “We arrive” then use “Llegamos.”

Where can I buy tickets? – ¿ D ó nde puedo comprar boletos? (Mexico), ¿ D ó nde puedo comprar billetes? 

In Mexico, tickets are called “boletos” ; but in Spain, they are called “billetes.” “Billetes” also meansbills in both countries. For example, “un billete de d ólar” means a dollar bill.

Round trip/one way – Viaje redondo / viaje sencillo (Mexico), ida y vuelta / S ó lo ida (Spain)

I would like 2 tickets. – Me gustar ía dos boletos. (First class, Economy class – premera clase, clase econ ómica )

Again, tickets are “billetes” in Spain. One ticket would be “un boleto” or “un billete.”

I missed my flight. – Perd í mi vuelo.

Literally, it means “I lost my flight.” So, you can swap the noun and say “Perd í mi maleta” – “I lost my suitcase” as well.

Here’s my passport. – Aqu í est á mi pasaporte.

Another similar phrase is “ Aqu í lo tiene,” basically meaning “here you have it” or “here it is.”

I’m here on vacation/on holiday. – Estoy aqu í de vacaciones.

In Spanish, vacation is usually plural “vacaciones.”

I’m going to stay for one week. – Me voy a quedar una semana (two weeks – dos semanas).

Staying only for a few days? Then you can say, “Me voy a quedar unos d í as.” “ Day” in Spanish is “d ía” (singular) and “d ías” (plural) and month in Spanish is “mes” (singular) and “meses” (Plural).

Where is the baggage claim? – ¿ D ónde está el reclamo de equipaje?

There are several different words for baggage claim: la cinta de maletas, la cinta de equipaje, la cinta de recogida de equipaje , etc. “Equipaje” means luggage.

I can’t find my suitcase. – No encuentro mi maleta.

If you can’t find a person, then you would add “a” in front of the person’s name. For instance, “No encuentro a Maria.”

How much does it cost to take me to________? (Taxi) – Cuanto por lleverme a _______?

Ask a cab driver how much it costs to take you to your destination before getting on the cab to avoid any unpleasant surprises. Researching how much a taxi to your destination should cost beforehand can give you a general idea.

Stop here, please. – Pare aqu í, por favor.

Wait a moment, please. – Espere un momento, por favor.

Is it free? (open/available) – ¿Est á libre?

Common Spanish Travel Phrases and Words for Shopping

I need to exchange dollars for pesos. – Necesito cambiar d ólares por pesos.

Banks in other countries tend to close earlier than the ones in the U.S. So if you think you might need to get some cash out, don’t forget to plan ahead.

Is there______? – ¿Hay _____?

This one is very easy but useful at stores, restaurants, and many other places.

What is that? – ¿Qué es eso?

You can point something and ask “ ¿Qué es eso?” If it’s right by you, then “ ¿Qu é es esto?” (What is this?).

Can I see it? – ¿Puedo verlo?

“ ¿Puedo?” means “Can I?” A very useful phrase. Definitely, it’s helpful to memorize this one.

I’m just looking. – Solo estoy mirando.

When you walk into a store and a store clerk asks you if they can help you find something. You can say , “ Solo estoy mirando. Gracias.” if you don’t intend to buy anything. At most department stores, store clerks work on commission, so they tend to be very eager to help you.

Can I try it on? – ¿Me lo puedo probar?

“El probador” means the fitting room.

Do you have size 40? – ¿Tiene talla cuarenta?

Clothing and shoe sizes are quite a bit different in each country, so be sure to check online before you go and get a general idea.

Numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100

– N ú meros: uno, dos, tres, cuatro, cinco, seis, siete, ocho, nueve, diez, veinte, treinta, cuarenta, cincuenta, sesenta, setenta, ochenta, noventa, cien

This quick study guide is packed with useful information and has a section on numbers as well. It is a perfect reference flip chart for beginners.

You can also learn how to pronounce Numbers in Spanish in this post .

t’s too big/small – Es demasiado grande/chico (or chica).

“Grande” means big or large, and “chico(a)” means small (you can also use “peque ño(a)” ). I wouldn’t worry too much about whether the object you are referring to is a feminine or masculine noun at this point. People will understand you even if you don’t match the genders.

“Demasiado” means “too” something (adjective). So you can use it to say so many other things. For instance, “Es demasiado largo” (it’s too long), “Es demasiado corto” (It’s too short.).  

How much is it? – ¿Cu ánto cuesta?

You can just point at something and say, “ ¿Cu ánto cuesta?” And if you are buying multiple ítems and want to know how much the total cost is, you can say, “ ¿Cu ánto cuesta en total?” or ¿Cu ánto es?

It’s too expensive. – Es demasiado caro.

Similar to the phrase above. “Caro(a)” means expensive, and “barato(a)” means cheap.

Can you give me a discount? – ¿ Me puede dar un descuento?

In Mexico and Latin America, if you are shopping at a local market, you can almost always get a discount. So it’s worth asking so you don’t end up paying tourist’s prices.

Do you have anything cheaper? – ¿Tiene algo m ás barato?

This is kind of similar to the one above. “Algo” means something or anything, and “m ás” means “more” and makes an adjective comparative when you put it before the adjective. Less is “menos.”

I’ll take it. – Me lo llevo.

If you like it and you’re going to buy it, then you’ll say “me lo llevo.” If you’re buying multiple items, a plural form of “ lo” which is “los” should be used. So you’ll say “me los llevo.” If you want to be super correct, select one of the followings “lo, la, los, or las” to match the gender of the item(s) you are purchasing…but that’s not crucial at all, so no worries.

Do you accept credit card? – ¿ Aceptan tarjeta de cr é dito?

Cash is “efectivo” and debit card is “tarjeta de d ébito” although most U.S. debit cards are not accepted at stores in foreign countries.

Check out these 75 Cool and Useful Travel Accessories You Can’t Leave without!

What time does it open? – ¿A qu é hora cierran?

In mid-to small-sized cities in Spain, many stores close for lunch for a few hours, then reopen after lunch. Their lunch is from about 2 pm to 4 or 5 pm.

What time does it close? – ¿A qu é hora abren?

Banks tend to close earlier than the ones in the U.S., and they often have different (shorter) business hours for Fridays and Summer months as well.

Useful Spanish at a Restaurant or Hotel

While traveling, these Spanish phrases will definitely come in handy. At a bar or café, you can just pick any available table, but I would recommend making a reservation if you are going to a restaurant.

I have a reservation. – Tengo una reservaci ón.

You can use this phrase at a restaurant or at a hotel when you check in.

Is there free wifi? – ¿Hay wifi grat ís?

“El Usuario” is the user name and “la contraseña” is the password.

I lost the key to my room. (at a hotel) – Perd í la llave de mi habitaci ó n.

It doesn’t work. – No funciona.

If something in your hotel room doesn’t work, you can say, “ No funciona + the thing that’s not working. ”

I would like _______. – Me gustar ía _______.

You can also say, “Quisiera______” “Quisiera” is a more polite form of “quiero” – I want.

I would not like_______. – No me gustar ía _______.

Is this spicy? – ¿Esto pica? or “Es picante?”

Mexican salsas can be super spicy, so I always ask before trying them…although they often say, “no, no pica nada!” – “no, it’s not spicy at all!” Spanish food is generally not spicy, though.

Is it sweet or salty? – ¿Est á dulce o salado?

If you are like me and enjoy trying new foods, you’ll need this phrase.

Gluten free – Sin gluten, Libre de gluten

Gluten-free products are not as common in Spain or Latin American countries as they are in the U.S. Or I should say most products are not labeled “gluten-free” as they are in the U.S.

The bill, please. – La cuenta, por favor.

You will need this phrase at restaurants.

Is tip included? – ¿ Est á incluído la propina?

In Spain, tipping is not customary at Tapas bars although appreciated. However, when dining at a restaurant in both Spain and Mexico, 10-15% of the bill is common if the service fee is not included.

Where is the bathroom? – ¿ D ó nde est á el ba ñ o? or “ ¿ D ó nde est án los ba ñ os? (plural)

Another word for the restroom is “ el servicio )” in Spain.

Occupied/busy – Ocupado

For example, “El ba ño est á ocupado.” – The bathroom is occupied.

“Estoy ocupado(a)” – I’m busy.

Vacant – Libre (bathroom), Vacante (hotel rooms)

“Libre” also means available or free.

Essential Spanish Phrases for Tourist Activities

Is it free? (no cost) – ¿Es grat ís?

Can I enter? (is it allowed to enter?) – ¿Se puede entrar?

If you are not sure if it’s okay to enter, it’s good to ask first, especially at religious places or semi-private tourist spots.

Is it safe? – ¿Es Seguro?

Is it dangerous? – ¿Es peligroso?

No smoking – No fumar.

Smoking is prohibited in enclosed public places in at least Spain and Mexico. So, bars, restaurants, nightclubs, etc. are non-smoking.

Do not touch – No tocar.

You’ll often see a sign with this phrase and an image of a hand crossed out at museums, historical buildings, etc.

I want to go to _______. – Quiero ir ______.

You can use this phrase for a taxi driver, a bus driver, someone when you are asking for a direction, etc.

Important Spanish Phrases for Emergencies

Can you help me? – ¿Me puede ayudar?

If you need help with your luggage or you are lost, this phrase will come in handy.

My wallet was stolen. – Me robaron mi caretera.

“Me robaron” + whatever the item that was robbed. Be extra careful of pickpockets, especially in big cities or in crowded places.

I don’t feel well. – No me siento bien.

When you feel better, you can say, “me siento mejor.” “Mejor” means better, and “peor” means worse.

My stomach hurts – Me duele el est ómago.

The basic structure of this sentence is “Me duele” + the part of your body that is hurting. You can also find more phrases and vocabulary about your physical conditions on this post.

I need to go to hospital. – Necesito ir al hospital.

Remember the “H” is silent. So, you would pronounce “hospital” as though it’s “ospital” with an accent on the “a”.

Help! – ¡Socorro!

Hopefully, you won’t need to use this one or any of these phrases in this emergency section while traveling, but it’s better to be prepared. So, don’t forget to memorize this word just in case.

Are You Ready to Use These Spanish Phrases for Travel?

I’m so excited for you that you are going to Spanish-speaking countries soon or planning a trip in the future. Hope you have a super fun adventure wherever and whenever you go! I hope these Spanish travel phrases help your trip be trouble-free and filled with wonderful, lasting memories.

Oh, did you download our free basic Spanish phrases pdf ? You can print it out and tuck it in your backpack pocket or save it on your digital devices. Here’s where you can download it.

Oh, one last thing…

How to say be safe in Spanish?

In Spanish, “Be safe!” can be translated as either one of these four phrases.

¡Que vuelvas sano y salvo!  (Hope you return safe and sound)

¡Que regreses sano y salvo!  (Hope you return safe and sound)

¡Que te vaya bien en tu viaje!  (Hope everything goes well with your trip) 

¡Que te salga bien en tu viaje!  (Hope everything turns out well for your trip).

As you have noticed that their literal translations are a bit different, but these are the closest phrases in Spanish that there are to “be safe” in English.

Don’t forget to check out this post: How to say Airport in Spanish: Spanish words and phrases you need at the airport.

Have an amazing trip and Happy Spanish-ing!

Interested in Learning Conversational Spanish?

Try these posts and unlock your Spanish superpower!

  • 30 Spanish Conversation Starters Every Spanish Learner Should know
  • 15 Fun and Easy Spanish Learning Hacks I Used to Become F luent Fast
  • Spain vs Mexico: What Are the Differences between Spain Spanish and Mexican Spanish?
  • 20 Popular Songs in Spanish: Latin Music for Learning Spanish Fast!
  • 101 Survival Spanish Phrases for Travel Every Traveler Needs to Know
  • How to Introduce Yourself in Spanish 
  • Easy Spanish Greetings: How to Greet in Spanish

Pin it for Later!

Basic Travel Spanish Phrases PDF

Click here to see “75 Super Useful Travel Essentials Every Traveler Needs!”

Nice job! You got the basic Spanish phrases for greetings down. Now a little bit longer phrases, but don’t worry, they are not too complicated. Trust me, it’s worth learning these Spanish phrases.

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The Ultimate Guide to Spanish Travel Phrases: 95 Expressions You Need to Learn

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If you’re looking to learn some basic Spanish for a trip to a Spanish-speaking country, going the whole “grammar and word list” route is a bit complex and time-consuming.

Good news: learning Spanish travel phrases instead won’t only help you learn Spanish you can use right away in conversations…

Contrary to what many people think, such phrases aren’t even just a quick “hack” but a valid long-term strategy to learn Spanish and other languages (as I outline in my article about Spanish for beginners ).

Anyway, more on that in a bit. First, let’s teach you some Spanish travel phrases!

1. Spanish Travel Phrases to Use Upon Arrival

First things first. If you’re planning to go to a Spanish-speaking country, learning how to greet people and be polite is a must. Otherwise, starting a Spanish conversation can be difficult.

No matter what kind of transportation you use to get to a Spanish-speaking place, you probably will have to deal with different kinds of workers.

Travel Spanish: Visit a beautiful country!

The best thing you can do if you want to ask for information, or just catch some worker’s attention, is to be polite and show respect.

Keep in mind that if you want to be formal, you’ll say and conjugate verbs using “ usted ”. If you’re just talking with friends or someone you know, it’s enough to use “ tú ”.

Now, let’s see some chunks that will help you be ready on Arrival at your destination.

Spanish phrases to use upon arrival

Since you’re trying to improve your Spanish, we would recommend not to use “¿Habla ingles?” as the first alternative. If you do it, natives will try to find someone that could speak with you in English.

Yet, if you find that communicating becomes complicated, it may save your day.

On the other hand, using “ ¿Me puede ayudar? ” is among the best alternatives if you need help when arriving at the airport or any place. People will know immediately that you require assistance to do or get something.

If you use transportation like Taxis or Buses, dealing with luggage isn’t a challenge. But, if you take an airplane, and finding your luggage isn’t that easy, you can take advantage of the last phrase above.

No matter what your needs are, you should always use the following chunks if someone helps you or you ask for help.

Ask for help with these chunks

Saying “ Por favo r” and “ Gracias ” will not only help you to show respect. Also, they will indeed help you to “open” doors as people will always be willing to help you one more time.

For more airport Spanish, watch this video by Paulisima from Spring Spanish (a YouTube channel I co-founded):

2. Spanish Travel Phrases When You Need or Want Something

When traveling, Necesitar and Querer are two Spanish verbs that will help you in several situations.

Spanish travel phrases travel signs

There are plenty of Spanish chunks you can learn and use with Necesitar and Querer . However, we will stick to the most important.

Travel vocabulary in Spanish: Necesitar and Querer

With these Spanish travel phrases, you’ll get any problem solved. From your basic needs to things on your bucket list like going partying in a Spanish-speaking country.

3. Spanish Travel Phrases for Partying

Latin American people are among the most cheerful people all over the world, and hanging out with them is an unforgettable activity.

You could learn the following Spanish phrases when you’re out having the best time of your life! 😉

Spanish Phrases for When You’re Partying

There are plenty of other Spanish phrases for travel you could learn… and in general, learning as many fixed phrases as possible (or chunks, as we call them) will help you speak Spanish more effortlessly in all kinds of situations.

You can learn them through actual conversation, but also through Spanish podcasts, Spanish YouTube channels , or check out the best Spanish shows on Netflix.

If you’d like to learn more about learning Spanish through chunks, go ahead and request your free Spanish Chunking Starter Pack.

4. Spanish Travel Phrases When Asking for Directions

Although most Spanish speakers are quite friendly because of their culture and way of living, getting along with them on the streets may not be as simple as that. It’s because some people feel that talking to strangers isn’t appropriate or just “not safe”.

When approaching someone you don’t know on the streets, you must keep your distance and use some of the following Spanish phrases.

Approach someone with these chunks

The approach is the most important step. After, it’s time to ask or request what you need. If you’re lost and you need an address or need help, the following chunks will help you get the job done.

Travel tips: Get help with these Spanish chunks

After you get all you need and it’s time to move forward, saying “ Gracias ” to the ones who helped you is essential.

It’s always important to say thanks. It will help you end the conversation and leave an “ open door ” to ask for help again if necessary.

Time to see some of these phrases/chunks in action! Here’s Maria Fernanda, one of the Spring Spanish teachers:

5. Spanish Travel Phrases for the Hotel

If you’re a traveler there’s no doubt that you’ll face some challenges when looking for accommodation. Let’s imagine you need to get a room and you have to talk to the staff of a hotel. Depending on your needs, there are several things you’ll have to ask.

spanish travel phrases hotel sign

For example, room type, if the price includes breakfast, or other things like if you have access to the pool.

Solve challenges at a hotel with these Spanish phrases

Please note that if you have made a reservation, you’ll need either your name or a reservation number. If you get a reservation number, you would say “ Hice una reserva con número…. ” instead of “ Tengo una reserva a nombre de… ”. Learn all the Spanish numbers .

Getting a room with breakfast included is generally a great option. In that scenario, you could say “ Quiero el servicio de desayuno incluido ” (I want breakfast included). No matter what you ask or need, remember to use formal language and make use of “ usted ”.

Here’s a good video about checking into a hotel, brought to you by Paulisima from Spring Spanish :

6. Spanish Travel Phrases for the Restaurant

After you managed to pack out everything in your hotel, you might want to grab something at the restaurant. Learning the basic travel phrases to order food will definitely help you when you’re hungry!

Spanish travel phrases paella in a pan in a restaurant

Useful travel phrases in a restaurant

7. Spanish Travel Phrases for the Hospital

Smart travelers always keep some medical supplies in their bags to face any kind of emergency. However, sometimes taking some pills won’t solve the problem, and learning Spanish travel phrases to deal with these situations is essential.

Spanish travel phrases ambulance in madrid

The following Spanish travel phrases will help you with your health-related concerns.

Spanish travel phrases: Health-related concerns

Although the Spanish chunks above will help you deal with most medical situations, sometimes, it’s necessary to explain any symptoms you might have. You can use “ Yo tengo ” before any of the Spanish words for travel shown below.

They’ll help you explain your symptoms and any Spanish-speaking doctor will have no problem at the moment of giving you the right prescription.

Explain symptoms with Spanish chunks

Tip: To make yourself understood to native speakers, especially in more complex situations like this, this article on Spanish connectors will come in handy. It’s an often-overlooked part of language learning but it can help you a lot.

Another tip: Want to see (and hear) all those phrases in action? Watch this video by Spring Spanish teacher Maura:

8. Spanish Travel Phrases for Everyday Situations

Although we provided you with the most important phrases for every possible situation, there are still some useful phrases left. Check out the following table to learn some of the most used Spanish travel phrases for everyday situations.

Spanish travel phrases, a traditional Andalusian street with flowers

Use these phrases in everyday situations

9. Spanish Travel Phrases: Your Key to Effortless Conversations in Any Spanish-Speaking Country

No matter what Spanish-speaking country you visit, keeping these Spanish phrases for travel will indeed help you deal with any scenario.

Let’s check out a Spanish conversation with some basic Spanish travel phrases:

Ana : Hola, disculpe… (Hello, excuse me…) Berta : ¡Hola! ¿En qué puedo ayudarte? (Hello! How can I help you?) Ana : ¿Sabe cómo llegar a esta dirección? (Do you know how to get to this address?) Berta : Sí, claro. ¿A qué dirección necesitas ir? (Yes, of course. What address do you need to go to?) Ana : Un hotel en la Calle Principal. (A hotel on Main Street.) Berta : Está cerca. Camina dos cuadras hacia el oeste. (It’s nearby. Walk two blocks west.) Ana : Hice una reserva con número 16. (I made a reservation with the number 16.) Berta : Perfecto. Disfruta tu estadía. (Perfect. Enjoy your stay.) Ana : ¡Gracias! (Thank you!) Berta : De nada. ¡Que tengas un buen día! (You’re welcome. Have a nice day!)

LISTEN TO THE WHOLE CONVERSATION :

Of course, if communicating becomes too complex, don’t hesitate to use the old life-saving phrase “ ¿Habla ingles? ”.

Requesting your free Spanish Chunking Starter Pack from Effortless Conversation is the best you can do if you’re planning to visit a Spanish-speaking destination. You’ll build your confidence and will feel much more comfortable when speaking Spanish.

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Lukas is the founder of Effortless Conversations and the creator of the Conversation Based Chunking™ method for learning languages. He's a linguist and wrote a popular book about learning languages through "chunks". He also co-founded the language education company Spring Languages, which creates online language courses and YouTube content.

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travel words in spanish list

74 Common Spanish Travel Phrases

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One of the most common answers language learners give when we’re asked why we chose to learn that language is because we like the country or countries where it’s spoken. Therefore, it’s not a surprise that if you’re learning Spanish, you might like to visit Spain. So why not learn Spanish travel words and phrases?

Whether you choose to travel to Spain for a short holiday or for a longer time, here you’ll learn all the vocabulary you need to find your way in Madrid, Barcelona, Seville, or any other city you want to visit. You probably already know that Spanish people aren’t that great at speaking English, especially in small towns, so if you want to avoid misunderstandings, this is the way to go.

Our purpose today is to teach you some common Spanish travel phrases that will help you be understood if you need help while you’re traveling in Spain—or if you want to order food, book a hotel room, get a cab, or take the bus. But even more importantly, we’re going to help you understand the answers you’ll receive!

Surely you don’t want to ask a local how to get to your hotel only to not understand the answer. That would make the whole process of learning the questions quite useless, wouldn’t it? Well, there’s no need to worry, because we’re making sure our guide of Spanish for travelers includes all of the Spanish phrases for travel you’ll need.

Without further ado, let’s delve into our list of useful Spanish words for tourists!

Table of Contents

  • Ten Basic Expressions
  • Nine Simple Conversation Phrases
  • Nine Basic Spanish Phrases for Travel
  • Seven Sentences You Might Need When Shopping
  • Nine Sentences You Might Need in a Restaurant
  • Nine Sentences to Ask for and Give Directions
  • Six Expressions You Might Need in Case of an Emergency
  • Five Flattery Phrases
  • Ten Useful Phrases to Go through Language Problems
  • How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn Spanish

Log

1. Ten Basic Expressions

Preparing To Travel

Let’s start from the beginning. It’s practically impossible to have a proper conversation without using any of these basic expressions, so you’re going to need them. If you already know them, don’t worry; you can skip this section! And keep in mind that to hear these Spanish travel phrases with pronunciation, as well as more Spanish words and phrases, you can visit our vocabulary lists on our website.

As most of you might already know, Hola means “Hello.” It’s by far the most commonly used greeting in Spanish and can be used at any time of the day.

If you would like to learn more ways of greeting someone, you can check out our article How to Say Hello in Spanish .

Once again, this is one of the most common Spanish words. It means “Thank you” and it’s obviously a basic word in many conversations. We would like our tourists to be polite, so we hope you use it a lot!

Now you know how to say “Thank you,” but do you know what to say after someone thanks you in Spanish? De nada literally means “Of nothing” and it translates to “You’re welcome.”

In our first list of basic expressions in Spanish, we can’t forget to include words like “Yes” and “ No .” Again, you probably already knew that sí means “yes,” but here it is just in case!

This is clearly one of the easiest travel phrases in Spanish for most of you. No in Spanish means “no.”

6- Lo siento

Lo siento is one of the most common ways of saying “I’m sorry” in Spanish and you can use it the majority of the time when you wish to apologize to someone. But if you would like to know what the most appropriate expression is for different situations, feel free to read our article on How to Say “Sorry” in Spanish .

7- No hablo español

If you don’t feel comfortable enough speaking Spanish yet, it might be useful for you to be able to say “I don’t speak Spanish.” If you want to apologize for not speaking Spanish, remember that you can combine it with the previous expression on the list: Lo siento, no hablo español .

8- Me gusta

Whenever you want to express that you like something, you can say Me gusta . If you want to be specific and say what it is that you like, you can add a verb in its infinitive form, a noun, or a pronoun.

Example: Me gusta bailar. Translation: “I like dancing.”

Example: Me gustan los helados. Translation: “I like ice cream.”

9- No me gusta

If you don’t like something, all you need to do is add no just before me gusta .

Example: No me gusta correr. Translation: “I don’t like running.”

10- Por supuesto

The last expression on this list might not be as important as the rest, but it’s still good to know. Por supuesto means “of course.”

2. Nine Simple Conversation Phrases

Survival Phrases

Besides the basic expressions we just saw, there are a few sentences you might need to know so that you can have a basic conversation when you meet someone for the first time. These are often included in some of the first lessons when you start learning a language, but they’re always good to review.

You might want to take a look at our Top 10 Sentence Patterns for Beginners in case you’re not too familiar with them yet.

1- ¿Cómo te llamas?

One of the first questions you might ask someone you just met is “What’s your name?” This is one of the key Spanish travel phrases you should know, especially when it comes to forming relationships while in Spain.

2- Me llamo Ana / Soy Ana .

Obviously, if you learn how to ask what someone’s name is, you also need to know how to reply! Two of the most common ways of saying “My name is…” are Me llamo … or Soy … followed by your name. The last one only means “I’m…” but just like in English, it’s still an option.

3- ¿Cuántos años tienes?

This is another common question: “How old are you?” Interestingly, when we talk about our age in Spanish, we use the verb tener , which means “to have.” This means that the literal translation to this question is “How many years do you have?”

4- Tengo 25 (veinticinco) años.

As mentioned above, the literal translation to this answer is “I have 25 years.” Of course, it translates to “I am 25 years old.”

If you’re not yet comfortable with numbers in Spanish, we have you covered: check out our Numbers in Spanish article .

5- ¿De dónde eres?

This question means, “Where are you from?” Because people are normally curious when they hear a foreign accent or language, it tends to be heard quite frequently when someone’s traveling.

6- Soy de Australia / Soy australiano/a.

There are two different ways of replying to the previous question, and they’re very similar to what you would say in English. Soy de Australia means, “I am from Australia,” and Soy australiano (or australiana ) means “I’m Australian.”

To learn more nationalities in Spanish, take a look at our Spanish Vocabulary for Nationalities .

7- ¿Dónde vives?

And finally, here’s our last basic question. ¿Dónde vives? means “Where do you live?”

8- Vivo en Londres

As you might expect, this sentence is the answer to the previous question. Vivo en Londres means “I live in London.” We chose this city because its name is a bit different than it is in English.

Now you might be wondering if all cities have different names in Spanish. Well, luckily, this doesn’t always happen, but it does happen sometimes. Normally, when they’re not that easy to pronounce for Spanish speakers, the names will be changed. Here’s a list of Names of World Cities in Spanish that might help you.

9- ¿Me puedes sacar una foto?

This sentence isn’t as important as the rest, but it’s still really useful to know when you’re traveling. If you travel solo and your parents want to see how you’re doing on your travels, but you’re not a big fan of selfies, you’re going to have to ask someone to take a photo of you.

The way of asking “Could you take a photo of me?” in Spanish is ¿Me puedes sacar una foto?

Of course, if you’re traveling as a couple or even with a group, you might still want to ask a local to take a photo of you. You can ask this question in the plural by saying: ¿Nos puedes sacar una foto?

For a few more useful questions, take a look at our Top 15 Spanish Questions You Should Know for Conversations .

3. Nine Basic Spanish Phrases for Travel

Airplane Phrases

Let’s get to more specific and useful Spanish travel phrases. Regardless of where you’re traveling, you’ll be taking cabs, trains, or buses. This is why we’ve listed a few sentences you might need if you take any of these means of transportation.

In each of these examples, we’ve marked in bold the most important part of the sentence. So, if you need to use any of these essential Spanish travel phrases for transportation, you’ll use the part in bold and change the rest of the sentence whenever you need to.

1- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Cab

  • ¿ Dónde puedo coger un taxi? Translation: “ Where can I take a cab?”
  • Me puedes llevar a la calle San Juan, ¿por favor? Translation: “ Could you take me to Saint John’s Street, please?”
  • Al aeropuerto, por favor. Translation: “ To the airport, please.”

2- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Train

  • Dos billetes para ir a Pamplona, por favor. Translation: “ Two tickets to go to Pamplona, please.”
  • Un billete de ida y vuelta a Madrid, por favor. Translation: “ One round-trip ticket to Madrid, please.”
  • ¿ En qué andén se coge el tren R5? Translation: “ On which platform can I take the R5 train?”

People

3- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Bus

  • ¿ Me puedes avisar cuando lleguemos al Museo del Prado? Translation: “ Could you let me know when we arrive to the Museo del Prado?”
  • ¿ Dónde me bajo para visitar la catedral? Translation: “ Where do I get off to visit the cathedral?”
  • ¿ Qué autobús tengo que coger para ir a Valencia? Translation: “ What bus do I need to take to get to Valencia?”

4. Seven Sentences You Might Need When Shopping

Basic Questions

No matter what kind of trip you’re on, you’ll need to buy something at some point. It could be food, clothes, medicine…who knows. We’ve put together a few sentences you might need in order to buy something in Spain. These may be more advanced Spanish phrases for travel, but you can definitely master these with enough practice!

1- ¿Cuánto cuesta?

When we’re shopping, we sometimes need to ask about the price of a product, more often than not due to misplaced price tags. This is why asking “How much does this cost?” is such an important question to know. Obviously, the answer to this question is even more important. Here’s an example of how a conversation might go:

Example: A: Perdona, ¿cuánto cuesta esta chaqueta? B: Cuesta 35 (treinta y cinco) euros.

Translation: A: “Excuse me, how much does this jacket cost?” B: “It costs 35 euros.”

In case you skipped the simple conversation section in this article, we’ll remind you once more that if you want to know more about numbers in Spanish, you can check out our Numbers in Spanish article .

2- ¿Qué me recomiendas?

This question means, “What’s your recommendation?” and you might need to use it when you’re not sure what to get.

For example, one thing we’re really proud of in Spain is our jamón . You might want to try it when you visit Spain, but when you come to our supermarkets or restaurants and see all the different kinds we have, you might be confused.

In our example, because we’re asking for a specific recommendation, we’ll add a noun—the thing we’re interested in—after qué . This is optional except when what you’re referring to isn’t that obvious.

Example: A: Qué jamón me recomiendas? B: Este es buenísimo y no es muy caro.

Translation: A: “What ham do you recommend?” B: “This one is really good and it’s not too expensive.”

Ham

3- Quiero cambiar dólares a euros.

When traveling, you might need to exchange your currency for the local one, which in this case is the Euro. Specifically, the translation of this sentence is, “I want to exchange dollars for euros.”

For more information on talking about money or currency in Spanish, you might find it useful to check this vocabulary list of Words Related to Trade .

4- ¿Cómo puedo conseguir un descuento?

You might not be able to use this one as often as the other sentences on this list, depending on where you are, but it’s still good to know how to ask the question, “How can I get a discount?”

5- ¿Tienes esta camisa en otro color?

In case you see a shirt you like, but you can’t stop thinking that it would look better in a darker color, you might want to know how to ask ¿Tienes esta camisa en otro color? which means “Do you have this shirt in a different color?”

Other similar questions you might need to ask include asking for a different size. Here’s an example:

Example: A: Perdona, ¿tienes estos pantalones en una talla más grande? B: Lo siento, solo tenemos esta talla o una más pequeña.

Translation: A: “Excuse me, do you have these trousers in a bigger size?” B: “I’m sorry, we only have this size or a smaller one.”

6- ¿Se puede pagar con tarjeta?

You’ll never have to ask “Can I pay by card?” in a big supermarket, but it might be helpful if you’re buying something in a small store, or in a local market.

Girl

7- ¿Dónde hay un cajero?

In case the answer to the previous question is “No” and you currently don’t have any cash on you, you’re going to need to ask where the nearest ATM is. The way to ask this is ¿Dónde hay un cajero?

If you think you might have trouble understanding the possible answers to this question, keep reading this article!

5. Nine Sentences You Might Need in a Restaurant

Chef Cooking

When it comes to Spanish travel and tourism vocabulary, we think that restaurant words and phrases just about top the list.

In this section, we’ve included a few sentences you’ll need in a restaurant. However, if we started listing all the vocabulary you would need to order food, we would be here all night long, so this is why we recommend our video All Food and Restaurant Phrases You Need . In this video, Rosa will explain everything you need to know about food in general, and also about Spanish food.

1- Mesa para dos, por favor.

Unless you’re at a fast-food restaurant, normally one of the first things you’ll have to tell the waiter is how many people will be eating, so that they can pick the right table for you. This situation can take place in a few different ways.

For example, the waiter might ask you as soon as you walk in how many people there will be. There are a few ways they can ask you this question, but the one thing we know for sure is that it will include the word cuántos , which means “how many.” He could ask ¿Cuántos son? which means “How many are you?” or ¿Mesa para cuántos? which means “Table for how many?” among others. If you’re asked this question, you can just say the number, or the magic sentence in the title.

There’s a second way this could happen: the waiter might count how many people he sees before asking that question. For example, if he counts four people, he might directly ask: ¿Mesa para cuatro? , which means, “Table for four?” If he gets the number right, you can just reply Sí . If he gets it wrong, you can correct him with the right number.

Finally, the third way this situation could go. You could be faster than the waiter and say Mesa para dos, por favor , which means “Table for two, please.” We previously said this is a magic sentence; let us explain why. If you’re still nervous whenever you need to speak Spanish and you didn’t understand what the waiter said to you, they’ll completely understand if you just say these words. Just like that, you’re in! Now let’s get you ready for what comes right after that.

2- ¿Cuál es el menú del día?

It’s common for Spanish restaurants to have a special menu for each day . Before deciding what you want to order, you can ask them ¿Cuál es el menú del día? which means “What’s the menu of the day?”

If you don’t like the special menu, don’t worry, because they’ll always have more options on the regular menu.

3- Por favor, ¿me tomas nota?

It’s quite likely that the waiter will approach you after you’ve been deciding what to get for a while. But in case you’re getting hungry and the waiter hasn’t asked what you would like to eat yet, when you see him you can ask him Por favor, ¿me tomas nota? which translates to “Can you write down my order, please?”

4- ¿Qué van a tomar?

Once the waiter has approached your table, you’ll be asked what you would like to order. It’s common for waiters to use the formal usted instead of tú , so the sentence we’ve suggested, ¿Qué van a tomar? , uses that form.

Another similar question the waiter might ask you is: ¿Ya han decidido qué van a tomar? which means “Have you decided what you’re going to have?”

Notice that both examples are in the plural. If you were eating by yourself in the restaurant, the waiter would ask ¿Qué va a tomar? instead.

Waiter

5- Yo tomaré…

Of course, if you’re eating in a restaurant, you need to know how to tell your waiter what you would like to eat. Here’s an example of how to order your food in Spanish.

Example: Yo tomaré las costillas de cerdo con ensalada. Translation: “I will have the pork ribs with salad.”

6- ¡Camarero/camarera!

If you need to call the waiter for any reason, unless you know his or her name, you’ll have to say “Waiter!” or “Waitress!” This is one of the many reasons why you should know how to say it in Spanish. If your server is a girl, you’ll have to say ¡camarera! , and if it’s a man, you’ll say ¡camarero! If you feel like that’s a bit too rude for you, you can also say Perdona , which means “Excuse me.” Here’s an example that we hope you won’t need:

Example: ¡Camarero! ¡Hay un pelo en mi sopa! Translation: “Waiter! There’s a hair in my soup!”

7- ¿Algo más?

This question means, “Anything else?” and might be asked after you’ve ordered your food and the waiter wants to make sure that you’ve finished.

The answer to this question, if you have in fact finished ordering, could be No, eso es todo , which means “No, that is all.” If you still want to order something else, you can of course say Sí , followed by your next order.

8- Tengo alergia a…

For people with allergies, it’s important to be able to let the waiter know about it. The way to say, “I’m allergic to…” is Tengo alergia a …

Example: Tengo alergia a los cacahuetes. Translation: “I’m allergic to peanuts.”

You might also want to ask if a specific dish contains an ingredient in particular.

Example: Perdona, ¿la crema de calabaza lleva lactosa? Translation: “Excuse me, does the pumpkin soup contain lactose?”

To be even safer, you can check Spanish Materials and Resources from Food Allergy Research & Education for some help.

9- La cuenta, ¿por favor?

The last sentence on this list is what you might need to say last, before you leave. As you might have guessed, this is how to ask for the bill. This sentence means “The bill, please?” and even though you could ask using a full sentence instead, this is all you’ll need.

6. Nine Sentences to Ask for and Give Directions

We’re sure you knew this section would come. After all, learning directions are some of the most essential travel phrases in learning Spanish and we don’t want you to get lost when you visit our beautiful country. But if you do, we want to help you find your way.

Here are some sentences you might need if you’re lost or can’t find your destination. Because these sentences have quite simple meanings, we don’t think you’re going to need anything but their translations.

People

1- Estoy perdido.

Translation: “I’m lost.”

2- ¿Dónde está la estación?

Translation: “Where is the station?”

3- ¿Cómo se va a la Plaza Mayor?

Translation: “How can I get to the Main Square?”

4- ¿Dónde está el baño?

Translation: “Where is the bathroom?”

5- Está aquí mismo

Translation: “It’s right here.”

6- Está detrás de este edificio

Translation: “It’s behind this building.”

7- Ve/gira hacia la derecha

Translation: “Go/turn to the right.”

8- Ve/gira hacia la izquierda

Translation: “Go/turn to the left.”

9- Ve recto

Translation: “Go straight.”

7. Six Expressions You Might Need in Case of an Emergency

We really hope you never need to use any of these expressions, but they’re important and need to be included in this article. Just in case, here are some emergency expressions.

Translation: “Help!”

2- ¡Necesito ayuda!

Translation: “I need help!”

3- Llama a una ambulancia.

Translation: “Call an ambulance.”

4- ¿Hay algún médico?

Translation: “Is there any doctor?”

5- Llama al 112 (cien doce)

Translation: “Call 112 [the emergency number].”

6- He perdido la cartera/pasaporte.

Translation: “I’ve lost my wallet/passport.”

8. Five Flattery Phrases

Whenever you travel to a different country, locals love hearing that you’re having a good time on your trip and that you’re enjoying the country. If you want to criticize something, be careful and gentle, because as they say, you can criticize your own country as much as you want, but if a foreigner does it, they’re wrong. So if anyone asks you, try to focus on the positive side!

Here’s a few basic phrases you could use to express what you like about your trip, as well as a couple more you might need when you meet a local.

1- Me gustan los españoles.

Translation: “I like Spaniards.”

2- Me gusta la comida española.

Translation: “I like Spanish food.”

3- Me encanta España.

Translation: “I love Spain.”

4- Muy amable, gracias.

Translation: “Very kind, thank you.”

5- ¿Tienes Facebook o Instagram?

Translation: “Do you have Facebook or Instagram?”

9. Ten Useful Phrases to Go through Language Problems

World Map

Some of the most important Spanish travel phrases may be those that will help you overcome language barriers. So we want to have you covered in case you have trouble understanding someone or don’t feel too confident speaking Spanish. Just calm down and remember that you’re still learning and that we’re here to help you. The next few expressions are some of the most useful Spanish words for tourists, so pay attention.

1- ¿Hablas inglés?

Translation: “Do you speak English?”

2- No te entiendo.

Translation: “I can’t understand you.”

Girl

3- No lo sé.

Translation: “I don’t know.”

4- ¿Me lo puedes repetir?

Translation: “Could you repeat that?”

5- ¿Puedes hablar más despacio?

Translation: “Could you speak slower?”

6- No hablo español.

Translation: “I don’t speak Spanish.”

7- ¿Cómo se dice esto en español?

Translation: “How do you say this in Spanish?”

8- ¿Cómo se pronuncia esta palabra?

Translation: “How do you pronounce this word?”

9- Escríbelo, por favor.

Translation: “Write it down, please.”

10- ¿Lo puedes deletrear?

Translation: “Could you spell it?”

10. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn Spanish

Now that we’ve reached the end, we realize you’re probably thinking that these are too many expressions for you to learn straight away. We’re afraid you’re going to have to do some studying, but hey, we promise it’s going to be totally worth it! When you start learning a language, there’s nothing like the feeling of starting to understand and being understood. And we’re sure you see now that the travel phrases in Spanish language learning are so useful!

At SpanishPod101.com, there’s so much more you can learn, no matter what your level is. And now, with our guide of Spanish phrases for travelers and our Don’t Travel Without Knowing These Top 10 Verbs list , you can go anywhere in Spain. Be sure to check out all of our resources , so that you can master the language and culture while having fun!

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  • Spanish Travel Words And Phrases To Help One On A Trip To Spain And Latin America

16 Nov 2021

¿Hablas español? Do you speak Spanish? Yes, this is what the first phrase means, and if you are planning a trip to Spain or any of the Latin American countries, but do not speak Spanish, then this handy Spanish travel guide is here for your rescue. Listed below are some Spanish travel words and phrases to help one get around in Spanish speaking countries. Have a look at the commonly used Spanish phrases for travelers.

Easy Spanish Travel Words And Phrases

A tour guide will ensure a smooth traverse, but what if he/she isn’t around while you are at a pub, trying to figure out what’s una cerveza and what’s un vino? To help one tackle these problems in Spanish speaking countries, here’s a basic list of phrases and Spanish travel words that might come in handy during a trip to Spain or Latin America. Read on.

1. Basic Spanish Phrases

basic phrases

Here are some basic Spanish words and phrases for general courtesy to help you greet people and ask some really basic questions in Spain, and Latin American countries.

  • Hello – ¡Hola! (o-la)
  • Good morning – ¡Buenos días! (bway-nos dee-as)
  • Good afternoon/good evening – ¡Buenas tardes! (bway-nas tar-des)
  • Good night – ¡Buenas noches! (bway-nas noh-chays)
  • How are you? – ¿Cómo está? (koh-moh eh-stah)
  • I’m fine, thank you – Bien, gracias (bee-en gra-see-as)
  • Nice to meet you – Mucho gusto (moo-choh goo-stoh)
  • Do you speak English? – ¿Habla ingles? (ab-la in-glays)
  • I don’t speak Spanish – No hablo español (noh ah-bloh ess-pah-nyohl)
  • I (don’t) understand – Yo (no) entiendo (yo no en-tee-en-doh)
  • What time is it? – ¿Qué hora es? (keh oh-rah ess)
  • I don’t know – No sé (Noh seh)

Must Read: 7 Reasons To Visit Spain At Least Once In Your Lifetime!

2. Directions And Getting Around

getting around

Often without the knowledge of the native language, getting around in a foreign land gets difficult. So, here are some basic Spanish travel words and phrases , to help one get around in any Spanish speaking city. Let’s start with if you get lost ;)

  • I’m lost – Estoy perdido (eh-stoy per-dee-doh)
  • Where is the bus stop? – ¿Dónde está la parada de autobús? (dohn-deh ess-tah lah pah-rah-dah de ow-toh-boos)
  • Where’s the railway station? – ¿Dónde está la estación de ferrocarril? (don-day eh-stah la es-tah-see-on de ferro-carr-eel)
  • I need a map – Necesito un mapa (Neh-seh-see-toh oon mah-pah)
  • I want a taxi – Yo quiero un taxi – (Yo kee-eh-ro oon taxi)
  • Right – derecha (deh-reh-chah)
  • Left – izquierda (ess-kee-eh-dah)
  • Street – Calle (cah-yay)
  • Airport – Aeropuerto (i-roh-pwehr-toh)

Suggested Read: 15 Top Things To Do In Spain That Will Leave Your Soul Craving For More!

3. Accommodation

accommodation

Listed below are some important Spanish travel words and phrases that might come in handy while looking for an accommodation during one’s trip. Have a look

  • I’m looking for a hotel – Busco un hotel (boo-scoh oon oh-tel)
  • I need – Yo necesito (yoh nay-say-see-toh)
  • I need a room – Yo necesito un cuarto (yoh nay-say-see-toh oon cwar-toh)
  • I need a room with a bathroom – Yo necesito un cuarto con baño (yoh nay-say-see-toh oon cwar-toh cohn ban-yoh)
  • I have a reservation – Tengo una reservación (ten-goh oo-nah reh-sehr-vah-see-ohn)
  • What’s your name? – ¿Cómo se llama? (koh-moh se ya-ma)

Suggested Read: Your Stays Made Easy With These Hostels In Spain

4. At A Restaurant

restaurant

Sometimes explaining what one wants to eat or drink, gets difficult in a foreign country. For example, if you want red wine you might just translate red and wine, and ask for rojo vino . But that isn’t what red wine is called, and there might be a chance that the waiter does not understand. Red wine is called vino tinto , and to get by such scenarios is this simple attempt at a few words that might be useful.

  • I want a menu – Yo quiero un menu (yo kee-eh-ro oon me-noo)
  • I want a beer – Yo quiero una cerveza (yo kee-eh-ro oo-na ser-vay-za)
  • I’m a vegetarian – Soy vegetariano/a (soy beh-heh-tah-ryah-noh/-nah)
  • The check, please – La cuenta, por favor (lah kwen-tah, por fah-vor)
  • Breakfast – Desayuno (deh-sah-yoo-noh)
  • Lunch – Almuerzo (al-mooh-er-soh)
  • Dinner – Cena (seh-nah)
  • Soup – Sopa (soh-pah)
  • Dessert – Postre (pohs-tray)
  • Water – Agua (ah-gwah)

Suggested Read: 12 Indian Restaurants In Barcelona: A Treat To Those Looking For Indian Cuisine In Spain

5. Shopping

shopping

If you are out shopping for local items and souvenirs, then here are a few words that might help you have a better experience. Have a look.

  • Where is the ATM? – ¿Dónde hay un cajero automático? (dohn-deh I oon kah-heh-roh ow-toh-mah-tee-koh)
  • How much does it cost? – ¿Cuánto cuesta? (kwahn-toh kwess-tah)
  • I need a receipt – Necesito un recibo (Neh-seh-see-toh oon reh-see-boh)
  • Money – Dinero (dee-neh-roh)
  • Credit Card – Tarjeta de crédito (tar-heh-tah deh kreh-dee-toh)
  • Cheap – Barato (bah-rah-toh)
  • Expensive – Caro (Kah-roh)

Further Read: Two Weeks In Spain: An Ultimate Guide For Exploring The Country’s Gorgeous Marvels Like A Pro

These were some of the common Spanish travel words and phrases that will help you get along on your trip to Spain or Latin America. Book your trip to Spain with TravelTriangle and have a hassle-free trip!

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Spanish Dictionary | Diccionario Español Ingles

Spanish travel words and phrases that you must know

You're preparing for a trip to Spain? Then, our list of useful Spanish travel phrases will make it easier for you to navigate your way through different travel scenarios. Your trip to Spain would be much more meaningful if you can communicate with locals. 

Useful Spanish travel words and phrases

Greetings and farewells

Good morning – Buenos días (bway nos dee ahs)

Good afternoon – Buenas tardes (bway nahs tar days)

Good evening – Buenas noches (bway nahs noh chayss)

Hi - Hola (oh lah). You can say that with people you know.

Nice to meet you - Mucho gusto

Do you speak English? - ¿Habla inglés? (ahblah een glays)

See you later - Hasta luego/'Sta logo 

See:  Common Spanish greetings and farewells

At the airport

When does the flight leave? - ¿Cuándo sale el vuelo?

When does the flight arrive? - ¿Cuándo llega el vuelo?

Where is the taxi stop? - ¿Dónde está la parada de taxis?

Where is baggage claim? - ¿Dónde está el reclamo de equipaje?

My suitcases are lost - Mis maletas están perdidas

Getting around

I need to go to ___. = Necesito ir a ___

Where is ___? - ¿Dónde está ___?  

I’m lost - Estoy perdido / Estoy perdida

When does the next train to ___ leave? - ¿Cuándo sale el próximo tren para ___?

How much does it cost? - ¿Cuánto cuesta?

Could you repeat that, please? - ¿Podría repetirlo, por favor?

Where's the bathroom? - ¿Dónde está el baño?

It's too expensive - Es demasiado caro

Schedule - el horario

Delay - el retraso

Entrance - la entrada

Departure - la salida

Arrival - la llegada

Hotel - el hotel

See:  Giving and asking for directions in Spanish

At a restaurant

Can I see the menu? - ¿Puedo ver el menú?

I need a table for two, please - Necesito una mesa para dos, por favor

What’s the daily special? - ¿Cuál es el especial del día?

What do you recommend? - ¿Qué me recomienda?

The Bill please - La Cuenta por favor  

Other basic phrases

I want ___. - Yo quiero ___.

I don't want - Yo no quiero

Do you have? – ¿Tiene? (tee ayn ay)?

I would like (more polite) – Me gustaría (may goo stah ree ah)

Hope that the above list of Spanish travel phrases may help you survive out in the Spanish-speaking world. Follow our site for daily vocabulary and grammar lessons.

Learn Spanish

Spanish for beginners.

Talk About Travel in Spanish

¡Hola! Learn how to talk about travel ! Specifically, learn how to do the following in Spanish:

• talk about travel plans

• talk about the days of the week

Let's start off with the vocab words in these lessons!

Days of the Week in Spanish

In these lessons, you learn the seven days of the week in Spanish!

Capitalization Tip

The days of the week are not capitalized in Spanish.

Hoy es l unes. ( Today is Monday. )

Hoy es L unes.

You also learn the names of the following vehicles in these lessons!

How Do You Travel?

You can combine any vehicle with the preposition en to talk about how you travel . Take a look!

Talking about Time

These lessons also use these useful words for talking about time in Spanish.

Remember that some words that end in a are masculine , such as el día .

In this skill, you learn how to use the verbs viajar ( to travel ), llegar ( to arrive ), and salir ( to leave ) to talk about travel . Let's take a look at the conjugation of these verbs in the present !

Regular -Ar Verbs

Viajar and llegar are both regular -ar verbs in the present tense . To conjugate a regular -ar verb, remove the infinitive ending ( -ar ) and add the ending that matches the subject. You can find these endings in the table below.

Present Tense Endings for -Ar Verbs

Irregular Yo Verbs

Salir is a regular -ir verb except for the yo form, which is irregular.

Conjugation Tip

  • The present yo form of salir has a g in it: sal g o

Here are some of the phrases used in these lessons!

Quiz Yourself!

Want more practice with the vocabulary you learned in these lessons? Click here!

Spanish Conversation

Let's put the grammar and vocab from above to the test in the following example of a conversation in Spanish.

Want to learn more about how to talk about travel in Spanish? Check out the following articles!

• Spanish Days of the Week

• Spanish Present Tense Forms

• Plan a Trip to a Spanish-Speaking Country

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Useful Travel Phrases in Spanish: Listen and Practice!

Sí, por favor, or no, gracias are two of the most famous Spanish travel phrases in the world, because they are so simple. 

When eating tacos in Mexico , hiking in Costa Rica , exploring Cuba , tasting coffee in Colombia , visiting the Maya ruins in Guatemala , admiring the Iguazu falls in Argentina , traveling through Spain , or stopping by Equatorial Guinea , it would be very wise to keep a few more Spanish travel phrases available in your head.

If you feel like learning a little bit more than some basic greetings and farewells in Spanish and adding an arsenal of phrases to your travel Spanish, lay back and get ready to start learning some travel Spanish by listening and reading some more Spanish phrases to become more fluent and sound more natural.

Why Is Listening Beneficial?

Before we start feeding your travel Spanish, it is important to understand why listening is beneficial when learning Spanish. 

As someone who has taught English mainly to Spanish-speaking students for a couple of years, I’ve noticed that those who limit themselves to only reading and solving grammar exercises tend to have a harder time with the language. 

On the other hand, those who take the listening exercises seriously and try to repeat as they listen tend to achieve fluency more quickly than their peers. While our level of mastery is directly linked to our specific set of abilities and how much we practice, listening to a native speaker in their language and trying to imitate them is one of the best pathways towards fluency.

Travel Spanish Conjugation

The first thing we need to know is our verb, the Spanish translation for “to travel” is viajar. In this section you’ll learn how to conjugate this verb in:

  • Simple present – Presente del indicativo
  • Simple past – Pretérito del indicativo
  • Simple future – Futuro del indicativo 

Keep in mind that, ustedes and vosotros are both the second person of the plural form—however, Latin Americans use ustedes and Spaniards use vosotros . 

Presente del indicativo

Pretérito de indicativo, futuro del indicativo.

To keep this part simple practice one sentence with each tense:

Tú viajas hoy. You travel today.

Mis padres viajarán el sábado. My parents are going to travel on Saturday.

Mi vecina viajó el año pasado a Colombia. My neighbor traveled to Colombia last year.

PRO TIP: In Spanish, we use el presente del indicativo to talk about habits, but also to talk about something that is happening today.

Simple Spanish Travel Phrases

We’ll start off with some basic travel vocabulary in Spanish. 

In this section, I include 4 basic phrases to show where you’re from, what you will do on your travels when you’re going back, and how long you are staying in a country.

 Check out these useful Spanish travel phrases.

Where You’re From

Vengo de Inglaterra.  I come from England.

Soy jamaiquino(a). I am Jamaican .

Soy estadounidense; vengo de Pittsburgh. I am American, I come from Pittsburgh.

Talking About Your Plans

Haré un tour por Guatemala, El Salvador, Belice y Honduras durante dos semanas. I will make a tour through Guatemala, El Salvador, Belize, and Honduras for two weeks.

No iré a Nicaragua porque no es parte de mi plan. I won’t go to Nicaragua because it isn’t part of my plan.

Regresaré a Jamaica el 3 de Diciembre. I will go back to Jamaica on December 3rd.

Estaré tres días y dos noches en Guatemala. I’ll be in Guatemala for three days and two nights.

PRO TIP: Some South Americans use the verb devolverse instead of regresar when talking about going back to your country. In the sentence above, you can substitute the word regresaré for me devolveré too.

Travel Spanish To Use at the Airport:

For most of us, the airport is the first thing we see in a foreign country. Latin America has some awesome airports , where they probably speak English—but why take any chances, when you can learn some useful Spanish travel phrases.

Looking For a Place

¿Dónde está el baño? Where is the bathroom?

¿De qué terminal sale mi avión? From which terminal does my plane leave?

¿Cómo llego a la puerta 40F? How do I get to gate 40F?

Stating Your Business

Vengo a este país de visita. I’m visiting this country.

Venimos por motivos de negocios. We are coming for business.

Mi hermano viene a estudiar; yo solo vengo a dejarlo. My brother is coming here to study; I am just dropping him off.

Stating the Duration of Your Visit

Nos quedaremos aquí por dos semanas. We’ll be staying here for two weeks.

Regreso el 25 de Noviembre. I’m going back on November 25th.

Mi hermano se quedará hasta el próximo año; yo hasta la próxima semana. My brother will be staying until next year; I will (be staying) until next week.

Declaring Your Belongings

No traigo más de diez mil dólares en efectivo. I do not bring more than ten thousand dollars in cash.

Llevo cinco cajas de medicinas en mi maleta. I carry five boxes of medicine in my suitcase.

No tengo nada que declarar. I have nothing to declare.

Travel Spanish To Ask for Directions

One of the most important things when traveling is asking for directions, knowing where to go and where not to go and. If you’re in Latin America. 

Remember to use the usted when talking to people you don’t know and are (or seem to be) older than you, and tú or vos when talking to someone your age or younger.

Formal Ways To Ask for Directions:

Disculpe, caballero, ¿dónde se encuentra La Mano? Excuse me, Sir, where is La Mano ?

Perdone, señorita, ¿cómo podría llegar al Museo del Oro? Excuse me, Miss, how can I get to the Gold Museum ?

Señora, ¿me puede indicar cómo llego al Palacio de Bellas Artes? Madam, could you tell me how to get to Palacio de Bellas Artes ? 

Informal Ways To Ask for Directions:

¿Dónde está el volcán El Arenal? Where is El Arenal volcano?

¿Me decís cómo llegar a la Fortaleza del Cerro? Can you tell me how to get to Hill Fortress ?

Dime por dónde sigo para llegar al hotel. Tell me where to go to get to the hotel.

Following Directions in Spanish

After asking, most locals will try to help you and they will most likely combine the following verbs:

With some of these directions:

Practice Sentences

Siga derecho y al llegar a la esquina cruce a la derecha. Keep going straight and turn right when you get to the corner.

Regrese por donde vino y al terminar la cuadra camine 50 metros al oeste. Go back, all the way down the block, and walk 50 meters to the west.

Gire en la próxima avenida y llegue hasta el mercado; allí estará enfrente. Turn in the next avenue, reach the market; it’ll be there right in front.

Spanish Travel Phrases To Use at the Hotel

After finally arriving at your hotel and being about to reach some peace of mind, you’ll need to talk to the staff . Since they are people you do not know, I would recommend using formal Spanish in order to be more respectful.

Phrases To Use When Arriving

Reservé una habitación sencilla a nombre de… I booked a simple room under the name…

Es posible que me quede dos noches más en el hotel. It is possible that I will stay two more nights at the hotel.

¿En qué piso (o planta) se encuentra mi habitación? Which floor is my room?

Asking About Additional Services in the Hotel

¿El wi-fi está incluído en la tarifa? Is Wi-Fi included in the fee?

¿Hasta qué hora sirven el desayuno buffet? What time is the breakfast buffet served until?

¿Tengo acceso al spa y al jacuzzi con la habitación que renté? Do I have access to the spa and jacuzzi with the room I booked?

Asking About the City

¿Qué es lo mejor para ver en esta ciudad si solo tengo un día para visitarla? What’s the best thing to see in this city if I only have a day to visit it?

¿Se puede llamar a un taxi que me lleve, me espere y me traiga de vuelta al hotel? Is it possible to get a cab that takes me where I’m going, waits for me, and brings me back to the hotel?

¿Qué tan seguro es visitar ese barrio por la noche? How safe is it to visit that neighborhood at night?

FUN FACT: Many Spanish speakers don’t mind when a foreigner uses tú (the informal way) to talk to us, since some of us adopt a “forgiving” attitude towards this.

Talking About Currency

While the U.S. Dollar is widely accepted in many big cities, the deeper you adventure yourself into a country, the more difficult it gets to trade with a foreigner currency.

Solo tengo un billete de cien dólares, ¿me puede dar cambio? I only have a one-hundred-dollar bill, can you give me change?

¿Puedo pagar con dólares? Todavía no tengo la moneda local . Can I pay in dollars? I don’t have the local currency.

¿Cuánto es/son…en dólares? How much is… in dollars?

Getting Cash

¿Dónde hay un cajero automático por aquí cerca? Where can I find an ATM close by?

¿Cuánto me va a cobrar de comisión por hacer un retiro? What is the additional commission it will charge me to make a withdrawal?

Necesito que me dé el vuelto en billetes de a cincuenta quetzales, por favor. I need my change in fifty-quetzales bills, please.

Moving Around on Your Own

If you visit places out of walking range you are going to need to get a cab, a bus, a tram, or a metro, and it is useful to ask around for metro lines, times, and being safe on your trip.

¿Qué línea de metro debo tomar para llegar a Insurgentes? Which metro line do I have to take to get to Insurgentes?

¿Cuántas paradas faltan para llegar a…? How many stops to get to…?

¿A qué horas pasa el siguiente bus y a dónde va? What time does the next bus pass and where does it go?

¿Hay un tranvía en esta ciudad? Is there a tram in this city?

Quotes About Travelling in Spanish

For this last little section, I compiled four great quotes about travelling in Spanish to motivate you to travel, get to know magical places outside your country and see how beautiful Spanish can be.

“El mundo es un libro y quienes no viajan leen sólo una página”. “The world is a book and those who don’t travel read only one page.” —St. Agustine.

“Viajar es fatal para los prejuicios, la intolerancia, y la estrechez de miras”. “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” —Mark Twain.

“Viajar es la única cosa que compras que te hace más rico”. “Travelling is the only thing you buy that makes you richer.” —Anonymous.

“Nadie se da cuenta de lo hermoso que es viajar hasta que llega a casa y descansa su cabeza sobre su vieja y conocida almohada”. “No one realizes how beautiful it is to travel until he comes home and rests his head on his old, familiar pillow”. —Lin Yutang.

Unlock a Continent by Speaking Spanish

These Spanish travel phrases are great, and you should practice them before visiting Latin America, Spain, or Equatorial Guinea, but remember that they can only take you so far. If you want to up your Spanish game, master true fluency, and make any Spanish-speaking country feel like a second home try a free Spanish class today!

Homeschool Spanish Academy can help you in your listening, speaking, and reading abilities, not to mention the flexible scheduling in our classes, earned high school credit, live instruction and different payment options !

If you still need a reason on why to learn Spanish besides being able to talk to more than 53 million people solely in the U.S. you might earn extra money at the end of the month by speaking Spanish. Sign up today!

Join one of the 40,000 classes that we teach each month and you can experience results like these

“This is the best way for your kid to learn Spanish. It’s one-on-one, taught by native Spanish speakers, and uses a curriculum.”

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“It’s a great way to learn Spanish, from native Spanish speakers in a 1-on-1 environment. It’s been fairly easy to schedule classes around my daughter’s other classes. The best value for us has been ordering multiple classes at a time. All the instructors have been great!”

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“HSA offers very affordable, quality, one on one classes with a native speaker. My son has greatly benefited from taking classes. We have seen his confidence increase as well as his pronunciation improve, because he learns from a native Spanish speaker. HSA has quick, personal customer service. Our family has been very pleased with our experience so far!”

– Erica P. Parent of 1

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travel words in spanish list

A List Of Every Word We Know Of

For years, we here at Dictionary.com have been working on a pretty ambitious project. We’ve been compiling a list of words that people use in the English language, and for each word that we add to the list, we write a few sentences about what it means. (A neat thing is that some of the words mean more than one thing.) 

A cool feature about the list is that you can use this website to look up any word on the list on a whim, which is how most people use it after they encounter a word they don’t know, such as when talking to a smarter friend or reading a book (so that they can be the smarter friend). 

Another cool thing about the list is that we’ve ranked every single word! We figured the fairest and most logical way to rank the words was in alphabetical order. This way you can browse through the list from start to finish. 

At this point you may have realized that this all sounds like an April Fools’ joke, which it is, but everything we’ve said is true (which is the best kind of April Fools’ joke, or the least worst kind). Yes, the gag is that we just defined what a dictionary is as if it didn’t already exist, which is our way of reminding you how weird and awesome and kind of hilarious it is that dictionaries do exist. (A list of all words and what they mean? Lol who do we think we are, stewards of language?)

We hope you’ve enjoyed this joke and our explanation of it (everyone has always reassuringly told us that the funniest kind of jokes are the ones that need to be explained). 

Now that you’re here, you might as well stay awhile where you know you’ll be safe from all the foolery and nonsense that’s happening everywhere else except this exact website, which you have to admit has a very straightforward and no-nonsense name.  

Like we said, you can look up words o ne at a time , or you can start with the letter A and browse your way through the dictionary, all the way to the letter Z . We promise everything you’ll read is true. (Except for the mountweazels , obviously.)

And if you get through all that, check out our other website, WordsThatYouCanUseInsteadOfOtherWords.com (we’re trying to think of a better name). 

Correction : The headline of this article promises, a bit disingenuously, a list of every word we know of. While it’s true that our dictionary is “unabridged” (we never write definitions while on bridges), it doesn’t exactly include every word we know of. We don’t add every word to the dictionary, and there are some words we simply haven’t had a chance to add yet (we have to spend at least some time on bridges). But we all agreed that you probably wouldn’t have clicked the headline if we had included this disclaimer in it, and also it would have been too long. 

Related Lists

Every word spelled with one letter or more, every word that does and does not rhyme with orange, every word with fewer than 17 q’s, every word that has never been spoken by a pine tree.

travel words in spanish list

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  • Solar Eclipse 2024

See the 2024 Solar Eclipse’s Path of Totality

A total solar eclipse is expected to pass through the United States on April 8, 2024, giving stargazers across the country the opportunity to view the celestial phenomenon in which the sun is completely covered by the moon.

The eclipse will enter the U.S. in Texas and exit in Maine. It is the last time a total solar eclipse will be visible in the contiguous United States until 2044.

Here's what to know about the path of the eclipse and where you can see it.

Read More : How Animals and Nature React to an Eclipse

Where can you see the total solar eclipse?

The eclipse will cross through North America, passing over parts of Mexico, the United States, and Canada. 

The eclipse will enter the United States in Texas, and travel through Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. Small parts of Tennessee and Michigan will also experience the total solar eclipse.

Much of the eclipse's visibility depends on the weather. A cloudy day could prevent visitors from seeing the spectacle altogether.

travel words in spanish list

When does the solar eclipse start and end?

The solar eclipse will begin in Mexico’s Pacific coast at around 11:07 a.m. PDT. It will exit continental North America on the Atlantic coast of Newfoundland, Canada, at 5:16 p.m. NDT.

The longest duration of totality—which is when the moon completely covers the sun — will be 4 minutes, 28 seconds, near Torreón, Mexico. Most places along the path of totality will see a totality duration between 3.5 and 4 minutes.

Read More : The Eclipse Could Bring $1.5 Billion Into States on the Path of Totality

Where’s the best place to see the total solar eclipse?

The best place to witness the event is along the path of totality. Thirteen states will be along the path of totality, and many towns across the country are preparing for the deluge of visitors— planning eclipse watch parties and events in the days leading up to totality.

In Rochester, NY, the Rochester Museum and Science Center is hosting a multi-day festival that includes a range of events and activities. Russellville, Arkansas will host an event with activities including live music, science presentations, tethered hot-air balloon rides, and telescope viewings.

More Must-Reads From TIME

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COMMENTS

  1. 100+ Spanish Travel Vocabulary Words for Latin America

    100+ Spanish Travel Vocabulary Words for Latin America. If you plan to visit Latin America on vacation, knowing Spanish travel vocabulary is essential to make your experience safe, smooth, and pleasant. Latin American Spanish is rich and diverse. While there's a lot of (regional vocabulary) in Latin America, many words are considered neutral ...

  2. 71 Spanish Vacation Vocabulary to Aid Your Travels ...

    4. la maleta (the suitcase, the bag) I think this is one of those funny words every language has. If you use it in the singular, it is translated as "suitcase.". Each individual bag you have is a maleta. However, if you use it in the plural, you can translate it as "luggage" or "baggage.".

  3. 67 Essential Spanish Travel Phrases Every Traveller Needs To Know

    Spanish-speaking countries are especially polite and greeting people correctly will go a long way towards endearing you to the locals, be they friends, people you meet in shops or on the street. #1 ¡Hola! - Hello. (O-la) #2 ¡Buenos días! - Good morning! ( BWAY-nos DEE-as) #3 ¡Buenas tardes! - Good afternoon/good evening!

  4. 100+ Basic Spanish Words and Phrases for Travelers

    Basic Spanish for Travelers: Accommodations. Spanish for tourists must include necessary words and phrases useful for checking in somewhere. Whether you choose a big hotel or an Airbnb apartment, the following basic Spanish words will come in handy: Basic Spanish Words and Phrases for Medical Emergencies. While we hope that your vacation goes ...

  5. 91 Top Spanish Travel Phrases & Words for Travelers

    Spanish for Visiting the City & Asking for Directions. One of the biggest challenges you may face is communicating with native speakers when visiting the city or a tourist attraction. Here are some of the most common Spanish phrases for travel that you may need in this situation: Con permiso / Permiso - Excuse me.

  6. Spanish for Travel Essential Vocabulary [+PDF and Audios]

    Spanish Dict - although Google Translate is an excellent tool, we suggest this app for traveling through Spanish-speaking countries. 5. El Tenedor (The Fork) - the app has information about over 30,000 restaurants in Spain. You can discover what is around your location, choose the preferred cuisine and book a table.

  7. 40+ helpful Spanish travel vocabulary every traveler needs to know

    Tarjeta de crédito (tar-heh-tah deh kreh-dee-toh) Cheap. Barato (bah-rah-toh) Expensive. Caro (Kah-roh) These are some of the common Spanish travel vocabulary words that will help you get along on your trip to Spain or Latin America. If you want to learn Spanish via a private Spanish tutor. Here is a recommendation for you.

  8. Essential Tourism Vocabulary in Spanish: Words and Phrases To Know

    Farewells and Good Wishes. Say farewell with this Spanish travel and tourism vocabulary. Most people in Spain and Latin America are open, warm, and friendly. I added some phrases at the end so you can make lasting friendships. Hasta luego. See you later. Gusto en conocerlo. Nice to meet you.

  9. 131 Useful Spanish Travel Phrases Every Traveler Should Learn

    Un balcón — A balcony. La terraza — The rooftop / terrace. El gimnasio — The gym. La playa — The beach. El vestíbulo — The lobby. 5. Spanish Travel Phrases for the Restaurant. Probably the most useful travel phrases you will need are the ones you would use in a restaurant.

  10. Travel Spanish: 70+ Essential Phrases for Your Trip

    Here is some useful vocabulary to substitute into these phrases: El baño — the bathroom. Un tren — a train. La calle — the street. Un cajero automático — an ATM. And lastly some practical vocab to help you understand the helpful directions people give you: A la derecha — to the right. A la izquierda — to the left.

  11. A Useful Guide to Spanish Travel Phrases

    12 Spanish travel phrases for the hotel. Busco un hotel . — I'm looking for a hotel. Yo necesito un hotel / un cuarto / un cuarto con baño. — I need a hotel / a room / a room with a bathroom. Una habitación para dos personas. — A room for two people. Yo tengo una reserva a nombre de…. — I have a reservation under the name of….

  12. Spanish for Travelers: Spanish Travel Vocab & Resources

    From essential travel phrases to ordering food and drinks, these guides are designed to make your interactions with locals easy and stress free. Let's jump right in! 91 Top Spanish Travel Phrases & Words for Tourists: Get familiar with these essential Spanish phrases to navigate different situations you may encounter in your trips. From being ...

  13. 50 Spanish Travel Phrases Every Traveler Should Know

    For a more complete list of Spanish phrases, grab your copy of the Spanish Phrasebook by My Daily Spanish! It's got all the phrases you need to survive---and even thrive---in a Spanish-speaking environment. Make your travel hassle-free with this e-book that covers all possible scenarios while traveling in a Spanish-speaking country.

  14. 105 Common Spanish Travel Phrases To Learn Before Your Trip

    Faltan diez para las tres - It's 2.50pm. Son las nueve de la mañana - It's nine in the morning. Son las tres en punto - It's three o'clock sharp. Falta un cuarto para el mediodía - It's quarter to midday. Related: If you want to learn more than these basics, then read our in-depth guide on how to tell the time in Spanish ...

  15. 101 Common Spanish Phrases for Travel

    Hi - Hola. You can use this any time of the day as it means "Hi" or "Hello", but people usually say this and then say one of the other greeting phrases below depending on the time of the day. So, for example, you might say, "Hola, Buenos días.". Good morning. Buenos días. This is normally used in the morning hours before 12 noon.

  16. 95 Spanish Travel Phrases To Learn Before Your Trip

    Travel Spanish: at the airport. 2. Spanish Travel Phrases When You Need or Want Something. When traveling, Necesitar and Querer are two Spanish verbs that will help you in several situations. There are plenty of Spanish chunks you can learn and use with Necesitar and Querer. However, we will stick to the most important.

  17. SpanishPod101's Essential Spanish Travel Phrase Guide

    In our first list of basic expressions in Spanish, we can't forget to include words like "Yes" and "No." Again, you probably already knew that sí means "yes," but here it is just in case! 5- No. This is clearly one of the easiest travel phrases in Spanish for most of you. No in Spanish means "no." 6- Lo siento

  18. 93 Essential Spanish Travel Phrases For Your Next Vacation

    sin productos animales - without animal products. sin azúcar - without sugar. 6. Spanish for travelers who want to have fun. The final - and probably most important - travel phrases in a Spanish-speaking country are those related to fun. The holiday is not over until you go to a fiesta and drink a few sangrias.

  19. The Ultimate Guide: 100+ Useful Spanish Phrases For Travel That You

    Understanding responses is just as important; learn key words like "izquierda" (left), "derecha" (right), "recto" (straight), and "cerca" (near). Equip yourself with a list of useful Spanish travel phrases specifically for medical situations before your trip. It enhances your preparedness in foreign countries.

  20. Spanish Travel Words And Phrases: Spanish Language Guide For 2023

    3. Accommodation. Listed below are some important Spanish travel words and phrases that might come in handy while looking for an accommodation during one's trip. Have a look. I'm looking for a hotel - Busco un hotel (boo-scoh oon oh-tel) I need - Yo necesito (yoh nay-say-see-toh)

  21. Spanish travel words and phrases that you must know

    Then, our list of useful Spanish travel phrases will make it easier for you to navigate your way through different travel scenarios. Your trip to Spain would be much more meaningful if you can communicate with locals. Useful Spanish travel words and phrases. Greetings and farewells. Good morning - Buenos días (bway nos dee ahs) ...

  22. Talk About Travel in Spanish

    Specifically, learn how to do the following in Spanish: • talk about travel plans • talk about the days of the week. Vocabulary. Let's start off with the vocab words in these lessons! Days of the Week in Spanish. In these lessons, you learn the seven days of the week in Spanish! Spanish English; lunes. Monday: martes. Tuesday: miércoles.

  23. Useful Travel Phrases in Spanish: Listen and Practice!

    Sí, por favor, or no, gracias are two of the most famous Spanish travel phrases in the world, because they are so simple. When eating tacos in Mexico, hiking in Costa Rica, exploring Cuba, tasting coffee in Colombia, visiting the Maya ruins in Guatemala, admiring the Iguazu falls in Argentina, traveling through Spain, or stopping by Equatorial ...

  24. A List Of Every Word We Know Of

    A List Of Every Word We Know Of. March 31, 2024. For years, we here at Dictionary.com have been working on a pretty ambitious project. We've been compiling a list of words that people use in the English language, and for each word that we add to the list, we write a few sentences about what it means. (A neat thing is that some of the words ...

  25. Solar Eclipse 2024: Path of Totality Map

    By Simmone Shah. April 1, 2024 7:00 AM EDT. A total solar eclipse is expected to pass through the United States on April 8, 2024, giving stargazers across the country the opportunity to view the ...