Bicycle Torque Specifications

The following table lists general torque specifications for common brands and components. Contact the manufacturer for updated torque specifications. We will keep this chart updated so if you want to add information or notice any errors please let us know .

Torque Conversion

  • Nm = in lb x 0.113
  • in lb = Nm x 8.851

Recommended Torque Wrenches

  • Park Tools TW-5.2 = 2~14 Nm or 18~124 in lbs. Ratcheting 3/8" drive.
  • Park Tools TW-6.2 = 10~60 Nm or 88~530 in lbs. Ratcheting 3/8" drive.
  • Bottom Brackets
  • Brakes (Disc)
  • Cassettes & Freewheels
  • Derailleurs
  • Levers (Brakes)
  • Levers (Shifter)
  • Seats & Seatposts
  • Wheels & Hubs

Torque Specification Categories

  • Trek Manuals
  • Bicycle Computer
  • Owner's manual

Trek Bicycle Owner's Manual

  • Owner's manual (40 pages)
  • Installation instructions (4 pages)
  • Owner's manual (24 pages)
  • page of 41 Go / 41

Table of Contents

  • Bicycle Type and Use Condition

Chapter 1: Guide to Safe On-And-Off Road Operation

  • Before a First Ride
  • Examine the Frame and Fork
  • Examine the Wheels
  • Examine the Tire Inflation
  • Examine the Brakes
  • Examine the Chain
  • Examine the Handlebar and Stem
  • Examine the Saddle and Seatpost
  • Rules to Ride Safely
  • Know and Obey Local Bicycle Laws
  • Examine the Suspension
  • Examine the Lights and Reflectors
  • Wear a Helmet and Bicycle Clothing
  • Ride Safely in Wet Weather or Wind
  • Make Sure Other People Can See You
  • Think about Safety When You Ride
  • Riding Instructions
  • Use Your Brakes Carefully
  • Change Gears Correctly
  • Use Pedal Systems Carefully
  • Safeguard Your Bicycle
  • Prevent Theft of Your Bicycle
  • Safely Park Your Bicycle
  • Include Repair Items When You Ride
  • Only Install Compatible Accessories
  • Clean Your Bicycle
  • Avoid Incidental Damage to Your Bicycle

Chapter 2: Maintenance

  • Clean Your Bicycle with a Moist Cloth
  • Each Three Months Clean and Polish Finish

Maintenance Schedule

Chapter 3: adjustment.

  • A Word about Torque Specifications
  • Examine Headset Bearing Adjustment
  • Examine Cables for Wear
  • Examine the Operation of Shift-Levers
  • Examine Derailleurs
  • Rear Derailleur
  • Internal Gear Systems
  • Examine the Internal Shift System
  • Examine Brake-Pads
  • Examine Brake Bolts
  • Brake-Levers
  • Examine for Loose Spokes
  • Examine Wheel Bearing Adjustment
  • Examine Rims for Wear
  • Wheel Installation
  • Tire Installation
  • (Accessories)
  • Examine Suspension Fork Bolts
  • Examine Rear Suspension Bolts
  • Examine Accessory Bolts
  • Training Wheels

Chapter 4: Lubrication

  • Bottom Bracket
  • Apply Lubricant to Handlebar Stem
  • Apply Lubricant to Seatpost
  • Replace Grease in the Pedal Threads and Bearings
  • Bracket Bearings
  • Derailleurs
  • Brakes and Brake-Levers
  • Suspension Forks
  • Rear Suspension
  • Apply Lubricant to Derailleurs
  • Apply Lubricant to Suspension Forks
  • Examine the Crankarms and Bottom Bracket . 18 Apply Lubricant to Brake-Levers
  • For more Instructions

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Quick Links

  • 1 Change Gears Correctly
  • 2 Handlebar
  • Download this manual
  • Table of Contents 4
  • Maintenance Schedule 18

Related Manuals for Trek Bicycle

Bicycle Accessories Trek Bicycle Computer Owner's Manual

Summary of Contents for Trek Bicycle

  • Page 2 Complete the Registration Future Reference Bicycle registration is the only record we have of who owns this bicycle. If it is necessary to This manual shows how to ride your new give you new instructions, your registration Even if you have ridden a bicycle safely.

Page 3: A Word About Bicycles, Accidents, And Safety

Page 4: table of contents, page 5: bicycle type and use condition.

  • Page 6 Condition 3 Condition 5 A bicycle made to ride on Conditions 1 and 2, plus A bicycle made to jump, ride at high speeds, rough trails, small obstacles, and smooth technical ride aggressively on rougher surfaces, or areas, and also areas where tires momentarily are complete jumps on flat surfaces.

Page 7: Chapter 1: Guide To Safe On-And-Off Road Operation

Page 8: checklist: check before each ride.

  • Page 9 To examine for a change of rigidity (flex test) We offer a generous crash replacement program. Do not ride, but use the part in the usual If you crash your carbon bicycle or part, visit your manner while someone carefully examines dealer to learn more about this program.

Page 10: Examine The Wheels

Page 11: examine the chain, page 12: rules to ride safely, page 13: wear a helmet and bicycle clothing, page 14: riding instructions, page 15: change gears correctly, page 16: safeguard your bicycle, page 17: clean your bicycle, page 18: maintenance schedule, page 19: chapter 3: adjustment.

  • Page 20 Minimum spacers with a direct-connect stem two to three turns. 2. The stem is held by the stem wedge. To On a bicycle with an aluminum steerer, there decrease the tightness of the stem wedge, should be at least one 5mm spacer under tap the top of the expander bolt with a mallet the direct-connect stem.

Page 21: Saddle

Page 22: headset, page 23: pedals, page 24: front derailleur, page 25: rear derailleur, page 26: internal gear systems, page 27: examine brake-pads.

  • Page 28 To put a direct-pull, cantilever, or road brake in To release the brake for wheel removal the center • For most road calipers, lift the brake release 1. Turn the center-adjust screw (Figure 27, lever (Figure 29) to the UP position. To close, Figure 28, or Figure 29) in small increments.

Page 29: Brake-Levers

Page 30: wheels, page 31: wheel installation.

  • Page 32 To remove a wheel with a FIGURE 40: Front lever position traditional quick-release 1. Release the quick-release lever; move it to the OPEN position (Figure 36). 2. For the front wheel, decrease the tightness of the adjustment-nut; turn it three turns. 3.
  • Page 33 (the parts of • Lift your bicycle and hit the top of the tire with the fork that hold the wheel). a solid blow (Figure 49). The wheel should not FIGURE 44: come off, be loose, or move from side to side.
  • Page 34 Make sure the lever does tire. The wheel should not come out of the not turn fork ends. If the Clix system does not pass this test, transport your bicycle to your dealer for repair. FIGURE 51: Adjustment position with marks in alignment 1.

Page 35: Tire Installation

  • Page 36 FIGURE 52: 7. Push the second bead into the rim with your Tire beads in bottom of hands. Start at the valve stem. rim well • Be careful not to pinch the tube between the rim and the tire (Figure 55) when you mount the tire.

Page 37: Suspension

Page 38: training wheels, page 39: chapter 4: lubrication, page 40: derailleurs, page 41: for more instructions, rename the bookmark, delete bookmark, delete from my manuals, upload manual.

Bike Faff

Bike Facts and Tips about Riding

BICYCLE TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS AND TORQUE SETTINGS

BICYCLE TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS AND TORQUE SETTINGS

BICYCLE TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS

Here is a table of torque specifications for common bicycle components. If you would like more information on how to use a torque wrench, or have any questions check out our article How To: Use a Torque Wrench On a Bike?

Please note that these torque settings are used at your own risk, and that torque is not often used when building or truing wheels. Spoke tension is normally measured by deflection. If you have any questions about spoke tension have a look on the manufacturer’s website or check out this article from WheelFanatyk

Bottom Brackets

Disc brakes, cassettes & freehub body, chainrings and spiders, wheels & hubs, derailleurs (front & rear), levers (brakes), gear shifters, seats & seatposts.

  • Here is a good resource from Shimano on some of their Torque settlings
  • Here is a good resource from Sram on some of their Torque settlings

Check out our article on How To: Use a Torque Wrench On a Bike?

You also might want to try out

  • Mountain Bike Tyre Pressure Calculator
  • Mountain Bike Frame Size Calculator, Charts, Fit & Frame Geometry
  • ← How To: Use a Torque Wrench On a Bike? (4 Simple Steps)
  • Do Mountain Bikes Come With Pedals? (Solved) →

Peter Ballin

Pedro is the primary writer on the site. He’s raced downhill and enduro at a high level, spannered at mountain bike world cups, and also written a book called Mountain Bike Maintenance. He’s appeared in both print & online major media publications across the Uk, France, and Japan (and even appeared on French Television). He’s made his living from bikes in various forms, from mountain bike guiding in France and Spain, Trail building in New Zealand and Canada, and working as a bike mechanic in the French Alps for many years. Pedro loves a good adventure and is often settling random challenges like riding down Mount Fuji, swimming across Lake Geneva, and hitchhiking across America.

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Torque specs for 2021 Trek Fuel EX 9.8 pivots

  • Add to quote

I found the service manual for the 2021 Trek Fuel frame but while it has great diagrams showing all the parts for the frame assembly, it doesn't provide any torque specs. Is this info available to the general public?  

They are right on the bolts, at least they are on my 9.8.  

trek torque specifications

On every trek I’ve ever seen, it’s been right on the bolts. I guess I don’t know if I’ve paid attention to the 2021s I’ve seen around. You have to deal with them just often enough to forget in between servicing and cleaning so I think I would take an engraver and put them on the bolt heads if they weren’t already printed. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk  

trek torque specifications

As others stated, these are typically right on the bolts. But here are some of the suspension torque specs: Mino Link - 17Nm Rocker main pivot - 22Nm Main pivot - 30Nm Trunnion shock bolt - 17Nm Standard shock bolt - 10Nm ABP nut - 15Nm Derailleur hanger - 25Nm Axle - 10Nm  

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trek torque specifications

BikeGremlin

Bicycle parts tightening torque (N⋅m) specifications

Bicycle parts tightening torque list

This is a list of recommended bicycle parts tightening torques that have worked well for me so far. Briefly put, I’m answering the question: “ how much should I tighten the bolts on my bicycle? “ A separate article explains the recommended bicycle maintenance service intervals .

If you have any questions (or additions and corrections), please use the BikeGremlin forum: www.bikegremlin.net

Follow manufacturers’ instruction – this list is primarily for my own reference and I’ll take no responsibility for any readers using it.

Table Of Contents (T.O.C.):

  • What is a tightening torque?
  • Recommended bicycle part tightening torques 2.1. Frame, seatposts, saddles, stems 2.2. Handlebars and levers 2.3. Wheels, cassettes, hubs 2.4. Brakes 2.5. Derailleurs 2.6. Bottom brackets 2.7. Pedals, cranks, front chainrings
  • Gates Carbon drive – belt systems

Here, I’ve explained how much you should tighten each bolt on your bicycle, how to measure that (before cracking your expensive carbon parts or stripping any threads), and why that is important.

– T.O.C. –

1. What is a tightening torque?

And why does it matter?

When we are pushing something, we can talk about force ( force, work, and power explained – video ). However, tightening nuts and bolts requires some force applied in a circular direction, so there we are talking about torque.

I’ve made a video explaining what torque is: Torque and power – basics explained

What happens when we are tightening a bolt? It stretches, acting as a kind of a rubber band, as it presses the joined parts together, creating what’s called a preload .

Too much preaload can damage a bolt, while too little preload can lead to a bolt loosening due to vibrations and other forces. In this video I’ve explained the bolted joints, and the importance of having an optimal preload and tightening torques: Bolted connection and tightening torque basics

Now, when we are tightening a bolt, we can’t directly measure how much preload is created, but what we can measure is the tightening torque . We can feel the torque by hand, and a precise way to measure it is using torque wrenches.

In detail video about torque wrenches:

How to use a torque wrench and do you really need it?

Update, November 2023: Most of the topics from the above-linked videos are covered and explained in my article: Tightening torque and torque wrenches explained – 101

When we apply the same torque to a lubricated bolt, it will create more preload compared to a dry, non-lubricated bolt. In the article about mounting (anti-seize) pastes , I’ve explained how the use of mounting pastes affects the recommended tightening torque . All the tightening torques shown in this article are given for joints lubricated with mounting paste .

2. Recommended tightening torque list

The torque list is logically sorted by the parts of a bicycle where the respective components are located. All the values are given with a consideration that mounting (anti-seize) paste is used .

The torques are provided in Newton-metres (N⋅m), and here’s an online N⋅m to inch-pound converter . 1 N⋅m = 8.851 x in-lb (N⋅m to inch-pounds) 1 N⋅m = 0.74 x ft-lb (N⋅m to foot-pounds) 1 ft-lb = 12 x in-lb (foot-pounds to inch-pounds)

Adjusting a torque wrench to a specified torque (5 N⋅m in this case)

2.1. Frame, seatposts, saddles, stems

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2.2. Handlebars and levers

2.3. wheels, cassettes, hubs, 2.4. brakes, 2.5. derailleurs, 2.6. bottom brackets, 2.7. pedals, cranks, front chainrings, 3. gates carbon drive – belt systems.

Here is a chart with optimal belt tensions:

Optimal belt tension for Gates belt drive systems

This is a tool suitable for measuring the tension:

A tool for measuring Gates Carbon Drive belt tension

Here is where you can buy this tool (Germany, where else? 🙂 )

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Relja Novović

Relja is an avid cyclist, a pretty good bike mechanic, and a professional computer systems administrator – with decades of experience in both those fields (computers and bikes 🙂 ). Relja Novović’s credentials and a short biography

4 thoughts on “Bicycle parts tightening torque (N⋅m) specifications”

Relja, is there any, or specific, reason you did not discuss “dial gauge” torque wrenches? Given all things equal (care and maintenance) do you have an opinion regarding the use dial gauge torque wrenches over “click” type wrenches? I assume click will inherently go out of calibration easier and faster, due to internal design, than dial gauge units.

Hi Christian,

Well noticed. 🙂

Those are not very popular among mechanics in my city – I suppose the local pricing and availability of remotely-decent ones plays a big part in that (very few bike shops have any kind of torque wrench for that matter). Out of sight – out of mind as they say. It’s a mistake on my part for overlooking to discuss and explain the pros and cons.

If I manage to source one for demonstration, I’ll make a follow-up video on dial gauge torque wrenches.

I have a Contoura AL12 bike with a Gates Carbon Drive. The belt temsion is adjusted by slackening 2 sets of allen bolts which then allow the wheel to move backwards or forwards accordingly.

I cannot find a torque setting for these bolts anywhere, can yo help please? Kind regards Phil

I’ve added the “ section 3 ” in the article with information for the Gates Carbon Drive systems. Hope that helps.

Comments are closed.

Please use the  BikeGremlin.net forum  for any comments or questions.

If you've found any errors or lacking information in the article(s) - please let me know by commenting on the BikeGremlin forum . You can comment anonymously (by registering with any name/nickname), but I think it is good to publicly document all the article additions (and especially corrections) - even if their author chooses to remain anonymous.

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Torque Specifications and Concepts

This article will discuss the basics of torque and torque wrench use. See also related article on Basic Thread Concepts . This article includes a table of various torque recommendations.

Introduction to Torque

Threaded fasteners, such as nuts and bolts, are used to hold many components to the bike. As a fastener is tightened, the fastener actually flexes and stretches, much like a rubber band. This stretching is not permanent, but it gives the joint force to hold together, called “preload,” or tension. Each fastener is designed for a certain range of tension. Too much tightening will deform the threads or the parts. Too little preload will mean the fastener will loosen with use. This can damage components, such as a crank ridden with a loose mounting bolt. Loose bolts and nuts are also generally the source of various creaking on the bike.

Tension in the fastener depends largely upon the amount of torque, the tightening, and the size of the thread. Generally, engineers will specify a thread size large enough to handle the anticipated stresses. For example, the M5 bolt of a water bottle cage bolt would not be a good choice for holding a crank. Even if the bolt were as tight as possible, it would not provide enough force to hold the arm secure to the spindle. The crank-to-spindle interface receives quite a lot of stress, making larger threads (M8, M12, M14) a better choice. The amount of pressure applied by a thread can be substantial in order to hold the joint secure. For example, a fully tightened crank bolt can provide over 14,000 Newton force (3,000 pounds force) as it holds the arm in place.

It is commonly believed that bolts and nuts often come loose “on their own”, for no apparent reason. However, the common cause for threaded fasteners loosening is simply lack of tension during initial assembly. Vibration, stress, use, or abuse cannot typically overcome the amount of clamping force in a properly sized and secured threaded fastener. As a simple rule of thumb, any fastener should be tightened as tight as possible without failure of the thread or the component parts. This means the weakest part of the joint determines the limits of tension, and hence, torque.

Torque Measurements

Torque for mechanics is simply a twisting or turning motion around the axis of the thread. This resistance can be correlated to, but is not a direct measurement of, fastener tension. Generally, the higher the rotational resistance, the greater tension in the threaded fastener. In other words, the more effort it takes to tighten a bolt, the tighter it is.

Torque is measured as a unit of force acting on a rotating lever of some set length. In the bike industry and elsewhere, the common unit used to measure torque is the Newton meter (abbreviated Nm). One Newton meter is a force of one Newton on a one meter long lever. Another unit sometimes seen is the Kilogram-centimeter (abbreviated kgf-cm), which is a kilogram of force acting on a lever one centimeter long. It is possible to convert between the various systems.

Also sometimes used in the United States is the inch-pound (abbreviated in-lb.).This is a force of one pound acting at the end of a lever (wrench) that is one inch long. Another torque unit used in the USA is the foot-pound (abbreviated ft-lb.), which is the force in pounds along a one-foot long lever. It is possible to convert between the two units by multiplying or dividing by twelve. Because it can become confusing, it is best to stick to one designation. The units given on the torque table here will be in inch-pounds.

It is possible to convert between the various systems:

  • Nm = in-lb x 0.113
  • Nm = ft-lb x 1.356
  • Nm = kg-cm x 0.0981

Torque Wrenches

TW-5.2 in use on bicycle stem bolt

Torque wrenches are simply tools for measuring resistance to rotation. There is a correlation between the tension in the bolt and the effort it takes to turn it. Any tool, even a torque wrench, should be used with common sense. A cross-threaded bolt will not properly tighten even with a torque wrench. The mechanic must be aware of the purpose of torque, and what torque and fastener preload are doing to the component joint. It is also important to consider thread preparation, which is discussed in detail in this article .

For a full overview of torque wrench types and the best practices for each, see Torque Wrench Use and Care .

Bicycle Torque Specifications

Below is a table of torque equivalents and formulas for conversions follow the torque table. The table is also available as a PDF file .

All figures in the table below are in Newton meters and inch-pounds. Note that some companies do not specify torque for certain components or parts. Contact the manufacturer for the most up to date specifications.

Wheel, Hub, Rear Cog Area

Headset, handlebar, seat and seat post area.

*NOTE: Seat posts require only minimal tightening to not slip downward. Avoid over tightening.

Crankset, Bottom Bracket and Pedal Area

Derailleur and shift lever area, brake caliper and lever area, disc brake systems.

Formulas for converting other torque designations into Newton meter (Nm) and inch pounds (in-lb.):

  • in-lb = ft-lb x 12
  • in-lb = Nm x 8.851
  • in-lb = kgf-cm x 0.87

Torque Equivalencies

Related articles, 1/3 - empty for section navigation chapters.

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trek torque specifications

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Torque Table

Got torque .

These ranges are a guide, always be sure to check with your component maker for the most up to date settings.

Always be sure to use a proper   bike torque wrench when setting up your ride.

Common Bicycle Torque Specs

Wera 334/6 Rack Screwdriver Set

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Thru axle torque, how important is it ?

  • Thread starter mangid
  • Start date 14 Jun 2019

mangid

  • 14 Jun 2019

Stopped to help someone with a puncture this morning. The bike, a nice Cube, had a thru axle, and it had a recommended torque of 10-12Nm. When I undid it it didn't feel that tight, and I did it back up to what felt 'right', tighter than it was I'm fairly certain. How important is the torque, 10-12 sounds like quite a lot to me ? I',m fretting a little bit that I might have left somebody with a potentially dangerous problem :-(  

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!

Joffey

I just hand tighten my Cervelo QR thru axels - I'm not sure they even have a torque figure on them.  

raleighnut

Legendary Member

I'd be wary of stripping the thread at the dropout if overtightened.  

rugby bloke

rugby bloke

The thru axles on my Giant has a torque figure on them ... but as I don't have a way of measuring this I just tighten them until they feel right. Low tech but it seems to be working so far .,..  

raleighnut said: I'd be wary of stripping the thread at the dropout if overtightened. Click to expand...

Pale Rider

There are several designs of thru-axles. My Suntour Q-loc has a quick release lever on one end, so I have that as tight as a standard quick release skewer. A couple of Cube roadie bikes I've seen use an allen key bolt. Not sure how tight that should be, other than 'nipped up'. It taps into the fork, so overtightening may risk stripping the thread. Carbon forks/frames might have a steel insert.  

  • 15 Jun 2019
Pale Rider said: A couple of Cube roadie bikes I've seen use an allen key bolt. Click to expand...

keithmac

Puzzle game procrastinator!

keithmac said: Torque values are to stop people snapping stuff or stripping threads. Click to expand...

SpokeyDokey

SpokeyDokey

67, & my gp says i will officially be old at 70.

  • 16 Jun 2019

My Trek has DT Swiss 'handle' type TA's ie no over-centre cam mechanism. Extract from the accompanying bike manual - note the tightening torque of minimum 15 Nm. DT RWS This type of thru-axle has a handle, not a lever; it is not a quick-release. The axle works like a screw, and the handle works like a wrench to tighten the screw. To secure a wheel: Instead of flipping the lever to close, you simply rotate the handle until fully tight (Figure 4), a minimum of 15 Nm. After the wheel is secure, you can pull the handle out on the axle (Figure 5) and rotate the handle to reposition it in your preferred position.  

Mo1959

SpokeyDokey said: My Trek has DT Swiss 'handle' type TA's ie no over-centre cam mechanism. Extract from the accompanying bike manual - note the tightening torque of minimum 15 Nm. DT RWS This type of thru-axle has a handle, not a lever; it is not a quick-release. The axle works like a screw, and the handle works like a wrench to tighten the screw. To secure a wheel: Instead of flipping the lever to close, you simply rotate the handle until fully tight (Figure 4), a minimum of 15 Nm. After the wheel is secure, you can pull the handle out on the axle (Figure 5) and rotate the handle to reposition it in your preferred position. Click to expand...
Mo1959 said: Sound like the ones on my Ruby. I just tighten them reasonably firmly. Hopefully if you then line up the handle with the fork or seat stay, you would see at a glance if it had loosened slightly? Click to expand...

Graeme_FK

  • 17 Jul 2021

Most of us working professionally tend to use a torque wrench as a matter of routine, these days. Those that don't, probably should. Liability would be one reason (obviously not a factor if you aren't working on other people's bikes). I've been a mechanic for nearly 40 years and I'd say I have a pretty good "feel" ... but all the same, I use one for consistency. In the context of through-axles, rotor rub can be a problem on some road and mountain bikes and the tightness of the through axle can affect that. The tightness of the through-axle can influence exactly where the caliper ends up relative to the rotor (bearing in mind you only have about 0.3mm to play with, in terms of pad-to-rotor clearance). On road team / running neutral service, again, most of us use an electric driver with pre-set torque for the through axles, both so that we can be as quick as through axles allow us to be on a wheel change and so that we can be sure that adrenalin and rush (or, post race, tiredness) don't affect the tightness of the through-axle. This means the riders are as safe as we can make them and the rotors are less likely to rub (I'd like to say "won't rub" but that would not be true!) ...  

Ajax Bay

mangid said: 10-12Nm sounds like quite a lot to me? Click to expand...

Similar threads

Slick

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Trek Emonda Torque Specs

Need some help here, currently upgrading my 2016 Trek Emonda road-bike to Ultegra components and can’t seem to find the proper “torque specs” in order for me to put it together. I am upgrading everything but taking the bike into the LBS to remove and install bottom bracket.

Any help here is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Torque specs for what parts? The specs for your Ultegra parts you’ll find in the Shimano Dealer Manuals (not User Manuals - which are mostly useless) on their tech site.

https://si.shimano.com/

Or just go to Trek. Its customer service is pretty damn good and quick.

Yep, it’s the dealer manual for each part you’re trying to install you want.

If it’s like most other bikes it will probably be either 5, 10-12 or 40!

Just make sure you do the right ones to 40Nm😂

5-6nm unless posted.

I believe it came with a 5mn torque key (mine did) that will cover cockpit and seatposts.

Bb and cranks is ungodly high so let the lbs check them when you are done.

I have this bookmarked, so so handy.

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Trek top cap max torque... really ?

  • Add to quote

So I just got a brand new Trek Emonda ALR Disc 5. I realized that the top cap screw has a "4nm max torque" written on it. Is it me or is this figure a good way to have a bunch of people ruin their headset bearings? By tightening by my usual rule of thumb (no play + 1/2 turn), I end up around 2.5 to 2.8 nM. 4nM does seems excessive.  

trek torque specifications

Since they can't laser etch complete headset adjustment instructions on a top cap I guess they just figured a MAX value would be good enough for most people. Not all people mind you, but most. You can take that for what it's worth, or you can overthink it...  

trek torque specifications

You would think that from a liability perspective there should also be a minimum torque spec, eh?  

trek torque specifications

No different than max pressure written on the sidewalls of tires. It's not a torque spec, its the max.  

trek torque specifications

Srode said: It's not a torque spec, its the max. Click to expand...
ToiletSiphon said: So I just got a brand new Trek Emonda ALR Disc 5. I realized that the top cap screw has a "4nm max torque" written on it. Is it me or is this figure a good way to have a bunch of people ruin their headset bearings? By tightening by my usual rule of thumb (no play + 1/2 turn), I end up around 2.5 to 2.8 nM. 4nM does seems excessive. Click to expand...

It's actually difficult to damage a modern angular contact cartridge headset bearing. If you tighten the top cap too much, the front wheel won't automatically return to a straight ahead position, after a turn. You'll notice that real quick. As long as that doesn't happen, the bearings won't be damaged. Traditional headsets are a different story. It takes a delicate touch to get no slop but no drag on those bearings and only a slight torque on the top cap can cause lots of drag and a major problem.  

I had the same question when I was building my Emonda. I thought that was way too much as I usually set it to whatever keeps it from being loose and making noise. I contacted Trek and was told that rating is for the expander plug and not the actual top cap bolt. If that is truly true, then it's very misleading. Hell, once it's all set up you can actually remove the top cap and it won't affect the set up.  

Whomever you talked to at Trek was wrong...the torque for the expander is much higher than 4nm, it's actually more than double. Says so right on it. 9-10nm. 4nm is the MAX...that doesn't mean you ever need to get it that tight anymore than a 120psi MAX pressure means you ever need to actually inflate your tire to that pressure.  

trek torque specifications

Just noticed today that the top cap on my Fuel EX8+ also says 4Nm max torque.  

trek torque specifications

4Nm is what I always suggest using, but you can bring it under if you have it tight where there is no play in the headset or spacers.  

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Methodical said: CX, here's the photo of the top of the expander plug on my Emonda. Unlike yours, Trek doesn't provide any torque specifications for the expander plug. I searched around the web and found nothing on it. View attachment 325671 Not sure why the image did not post in my response as a thumbnail. Click to expand...

Not sure what Mitch does at Trek but I've never tightened a normal threadless headset to 4nm. With the Domane SL/SLR you need to comperess the spring washer so 4nm is needed. It's definitely more than a normal headset. I'll have to try it sometime w/ a torque wrench to see just what happens.  

Maybe we're talking about two different items. I was reffering to the cap top bolt which indicates 4Nm on the top. That is the max, but you can use less if your spacers are not able to be moved and the bolt is snug.  

Wow, interesting thread. Never knew torqueing a headseat cap can be so confusing! However, the "torque specs" on the part is the "exact" torque to be used, that's why ther's a number and that's why there's a torque wrench. If it is just a "max torque" number, then it defeats the purpose of having specs in the first place. If you say that 4 Nm is max, then hell anything from 0 Nm to 4 Nm would still be understood as "within spec", doesn't it, and thus having a spec in this fashion is useless.  

aclinjury said: Wow, interesting thread. Never knew torqueing a headseat cap can be so confusing! Click to expand...

On Shimano crankarms, it says torque 12-14 Nm. This is a clear specification. Maybe Trek is not good at spec'ing stuff.  

That's for the pinch bolts that hold the arm on...you haven't got confused about that have you? ETA: Nevermind, I think I know what you mean. Yes, that is quite clear and easily understood. But to me so is: Max 4Nm.  

Hmm... standards when it comes to torque specs, generally the number listed, unless it include qualifiers, is what you need to torque it to. Every bolt on machines, vehicles, etc, that has a torque value, you torque it to that value (especially when it comes to TTY bolts... Torque to Yield, or stretch bolts as some call them) When there is a range, they usually specify a range, or as the poster above noted, adding MAX, which typically is there so you don't split or break the part. That said, when it comes to parts with bearings, and wear and tear rotational parts where the torque may change over time, obviously the values will differ  

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trek torque specifications

Velotric Summit 1 E-Bike review: The fast, lower-cost torque sensor eMTB I’ve wanted

Avatar for Micah Toll

I’ve been on the hunt for an electric mountain bike that would give me much of the performance of the fancier, high-priced models, yet without their major downside: that higher price. The Velotric Summit 1 rolled in at the perfect time, and while the bike itself isn’t perfect, it’s darn near exactly what I’d want from an eMTB that focuses on keeping prices down.

The bright orange e-bike is even more fun to ride than it is to look at. But you’ll want to watch too, so make sure you take a gander at my riding video below to come along with me. Then keep reading for even more, below!

Velotric Summit 1 Video Review

Velotric Summit 1 tech specs

  • Motor:  750W (1,300W peak-rated) rear hub motor with 90Nm of torque
  • Top speed:  28 mph (50 km/h)
  • Range:  Claimed up to 70 miles (up to 112 km)
  • Battery:  48V 14.7Ah (705.6 Wh)
  • Weight : 62 lb (28 kg)
  • Load capacity: 440 lb (200 kg)
  • Frame:  Triple-butted aluminum alloy
  • Tires : Kenda 27.5×2.6″ fat tires
  • Brakes:  Dual-piston Shimano hydraulic disc brakes
  • Extras:  Color display, 15 pedal assist levels, front and rear LED light with brake light, front suspension, kickstand, internally routed cables, removable battery, Apple FindMy, torque sensor, UL-compliant battery and e-bike system

trek torque specifications

What does this e-bike offer

First of all, since Velotric is known more as a street-focused brand, the Summit 1 retains a lot of what makes the brand’s other models great for cruising the roads. That means you still get features like built-in LED lighting, Apple FindMy location tracking, and the ability to add fenders/racks for city and utility riding.

But of course, the main purpose of Summit 1 is trail riding, and that’s where the bike feels most at home.

The 750W rear motor puts out a peak power figure of closer to 1,300 watts, which along with the 90 Nm of torque is where your true hill-climbing potential comes from. For those of you with flat terrain like me, that also translates into powerful off-the-line starts, so it’s not wasted on us coastal sea levelers.

The battery is rather average-sized at 700 Wh, but is easily removable for charging either on or off the bike. Since the bike weighs 68 lb, you also might want to take that battery out when you lift the bike, such as into the back of a truck.

And another note on the battery: it’s UL-compliant. In fact, the entire e-bike is UL-compliant also, giving riders added peace of mind.

trek torque specifications

When it comes to range, Velotric says you’ll get 60 miles (100 km) on throttle or 70 miles (112 km) on pedal assist.

That pedal assist range sounds about right, considering the 15 levels of pedal assist can provide either powerful or soft assist, and that lower power end of the spectrum is where your best range will come from.

But the 60-mile throttle range seems quite lofty unless you’re cruising around at leisurely speeds of 10-12 mph. And if you’re riding off-road nature trails, there’s a chance you will be. But suffice it to say that with 700Wh of capacity, the bike has roughly average battery capacity and will hang with or surpass just about any other eMTB in its class when it comes to range.

trek torque specifications

Torque sensor for the win!

On bikes that are designed to be pedaled frequently, such as electric mountain bikes, a torque sensor is a beautiful piece of equipment to have. As we’ve talked about before , the torque sensor basically makes the power delivery a lot more natural and intuitive by giving you more or less power based on how hard you pedal instead of how fast you pedal.

On a bike designed for cruising in the bike lane, the lack of a good torque sensor is less noticeable. But when you’re trying to climb up a steep mountain bike trail, having instantaneous power on tap is a great advantage to have.

trek torque specifications

I’m also glad to see the bike is well-made, including using a strong through-axle for the front wheel and frame welds that look solid.

The bike is tested to exceed standard ISO tests used for electric mountain bikes, which is how the company can claim that higher weight capacity for a type of bike that is expected to live a rough life handling tough trails and bumpy rides.

The battery is even IPX7-rated, which means it can be submerged in water. I tested that very claim by tossing a Velotric battery in a tub of water, and lo and behold, it worked just fine when I took it out. So if the storm clouds move in during your ride, you may have to worry about traction, but you won’t have to worry about the safety of your battery.

And if I’m being a bit superficial, I’m also glad to see the nice, vibrant color options there are. Obviously that’s not a key performance differentiator, but since many people like to choose a bike color that matches their personality, having bright oranges and blues in addition to the more muted grayscale is nice to see.

trek torque specifications

What are the downsides?

Look, the bike rides great. The 120mm hydraulic suspension fork does a great job on the bumps and the bike is comfortable to flick around a trail. But no bike is perfect, and it’s fair to say that Velotric had to cut some corners compared to the fancier “true eMTBs” you’ll see in the bike shops.

For one, there’s no mid-drive motor, which the more lycra-minded riders often tout as the pinnacle of eMTB drives. Yes, mid-drives give great balance and usually mean a fancy German motor, but they also come with fancy German prices. So you’re giving up that mid-drive in favor of a rear-heavy hub motor, but saving a lot of green!

Next, the 8-speed derailleur is a simple Shimano Altus. It’s not bad, but it’s not a great piece of kit, either. It’s fine for recreational riders, but it won’t take the same beating or have the same lower maintenance as higher-end derailleurs.

And those tires? They’re Kendas, not something fancier like Maxxis. But here again, it feels fine for normies like me. I was hitting sandy singletrack without any traction issues, and I haven’t gotten a single flat… yet.

So sure, there are some modest parts mixed in here to help keep the price down to just $1,999 , compared to the higher dollar eMTBs out there. But I think the right compromises were made in the right places, saving areas like safety and build quality as the main points where Velotric invested more heavily.

trek torque specifications

Sum it up for me!

The Velotric Summit 1 is a great riding e-bike that can handle mountain bike trails the way they’re meant to be ridden, but doesn’t carry the same $4-6k price tag of many more pro-level electric mountain bikes. At just $1,999 , it’s a lot easier for a casual rider to justify.

I’ve had a blast riding trails on it the way I’d use a fancier hard-tail electric mountain bike. Sure, a mid-drive motor and higher-end transmission would upgrade the bike, but I’m happy to make those sacrifices in favor of more recreational-focused components that get the same job done at a fraction of the price.

With the build quality and safety that’s been engineered into the bike, I’m giving this one a solid recommendation for newer riders and enthusiasts alike. Just don’t think you’ll catch big air on the massive jumps you see $8,000 full suspension eMTBs handling.

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Micah Toll is a personal electric vehicle enthusiast, battery nerd, and author of the Amazon #1 bestselling books DIY Lithium Batteries , DIY Solar Power,   The Ultimate DIY Ebike Guide  and The Electric Bike Manifesto .

The e-bikes that make up Micah’s current daily drivers are the $999 Lectric XP 2.0 , the $1,095 Ride1Up Roadster V2 , the $1,199 Rad Power Bikes RadMission , and the $3,299 Priority Current . But it’s a pretty evolving list these days.

You can send Micah tips at [email protected], or find him on Twitter , Instagram , or TikTok .

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COMMENTS

  1. Owner's manual

    Torque specifications should be used to make sure you do not over- or under-tighten a fastener. Over-tightening does not provide extra holding power and may actually lead to component damage or breakage. ... Typically torque specs are printed right onto Trek components. Look for a number with Nm printed after, for example, "4 Nm max." (For ...

  2. Owner's manual

    Under-tightening a part may also lead to problems, as a loose fastener can let the part come loose or can lead to fatigue failure. To prevent these problems, use a torque wrench to set the proper torque value. Typically torque specs are printed right onto Trek components. Look for a number with Nm printed after, for example, '4 Nm max'.

  3. Torque Specifications

    The following table lists general torque specifications for common brands and components. Contact the manufacturer for updated torque specifications. We will keep this chart updated so if you want to add information or notice any errors please let us know. Torque Conversion. Nm = in lb x 0.113 ; in lb = Nm x 8.851; Recommended Torque Wrenches

  4. TREK BICYCLE OWNER'S MANUAL Pdf Download

    Training Wheels See other sections of this manual as needed. 1. Put the bicycle on a flat, smooth surface, with the tires correctly inflated. 2. Decrease the tightness of the rear-axle nuts. 3. Hold the bicycle up straight, and adjust the distance between the training wheels and the ground to approximately 1/4"...

  5. BICYCLE TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS AND TORQUE SETTINGS

    BICYCLE TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. Here is a table of torque specifications for common bicycle components. If you would like more information on how to use a torque wrench, or have any questions check out our article How To: Use a Torque Wrench On a Bike?. Please note that these torque settings are used at your own risk, and that torque is not often used when building or truing wheels.

  6. Torque specs for 2021 Trek Fuel EX 9.8 pivots

    616 posts · Joined 2019. #4 · Apr 14, 2021. As others stated, these are typically right on the bolts. But here are some of the suspension torque specs: Mino Link - 17Nm. Rocker main pivot - 22Nm. Main pivot - 30Nm. Trunnion shock bolt - 17Nm. Standard shock bolt - 10Nm.

  7. PDF 2020 DOMANE SLR

    bolt to the recommended torque value. SEATPOST BOLT NOTE Use a long stem 5mm socket on your torque wrench to tighten the seatpost bolt. This will allow an improved fit on the bolt and will prevent wrench marks on the bike finish. B. Install the front derailleur 1.Use the special carbon washer and bolt to install the front derailleur at the base ...

  8. Bicycle parts tightening torque (N⋅m) specifications

    Follow manufacturers' instruction - this list is primarily for my own reference and I'll take no responsibility for any readers using it. The torques are provided in Newton-metres (N⋅m), and here's an online N⋅m to inch-pound converter. 1 N⋅m = 8.851 x in-lb (N⋅m to inch-pounds) 1 N⋅m = 0.74 x ft-lb (N⋅m to foot-pounds) 1 ft ...

  9. Torque Specifications and Concepts

    Torque is measured as a unit of force acting on a rotating lever of some set length. In the bike industry and elsewhere, the common unit used to measure torque is the Newton meter (abbreviated Nm). One Newton meter is a force of one Newton on a one meter long lever. Another unit sometimes seen is the Kilogram-centimeter (abbreviated kgf-cm ...

  10. PDF 2019 MADONE ASSEMBLY MANUAL

    Housing specs [w/ 40mm of stack] are subject to trimming for proper build H1 Stem Size Bar Size FB Housing (mm) RB Housing (mm) FD/RD Housing (mm) 50 90 40 695 1125 825 52 705 1140 835 54 42 ... Torque the bolt to recommended torque, but not more than 0.7Nm. 4. Install the front derailleur at the base of the front derailleur hanger. Tighten the ...

  11. Rail (625Wh)

    Trek . Rail (625Wh) Torque Specs Trek Rail 9.7 Carbon. Thread starter GIORIDER; Start date Dec 21, 2022; G. GIORIDER Member. Oct 30, 2022 ... One thing I like about the treks is just about every bolt has the torque specs unfortunately the stem bolts or stem doesn't mention it. If anyone knows it would be greatly appreciated. R. Roy D Member ...

  12. Bicycle Torque Table

    336-372 lb/in (38- 42 Nm) Big Earl cranks with a single M12 bolt on each arm. 384-420 lb/in (43.4-47.4 Nm) Race X Lite ATB cranks with a single M15 bolt on each arm. 384-480 lb/in (42.4-47.4 Nm) Race XXX Lite road. 600 lb/in (67.5 Nm) all other Bontrager cranks with a single M15 bolt on each arm.

  13. Owner's manual

    Under-tightening a part may also lead to problems, as a loose fastener can let the part come loose or can lead to fatigue failure. To prevent these problems, use a torque wrench to set the proper torque value. Typically torque specs are printed right onto Trek components. Look for a number with Nm printed after, for example, '4 Nm max'.

  14. Thru axle torque, how important is it

    SpokeyDokey said: My Trek has DT Swiss 'handle' type TA's ie no over-centre cam mechanism. Extract from the accompanying bike manual - note the tightening torque of minimum 15 Nm. DT RWS This type of thru-axle has a handle, not a lever; it is not a quick-release. The axle works like a screw, and the handle works like a wrench to tighten the ...

  15. Trek Emonda Torque Specs

    Need some help here, currently upgrading my 2016 Trek Emonda road-bike to Ultegra components and can't seem to find the proper "torque specs" in order for me to put it together. I am upgrading everything but taking the bike into the LBS to remove and install bottom bracket. Any help here is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

  16. Trek top cap max torque... really

    Methodical said: CX, I spoke with Trek again and initially the rep stated that the torque spec was 4nm right off the top of the top cap bolt. So, obviously this is very misleading because even the Trek rep thought that was the torque spec because that is what's on the top cap bolt. But, when I pointed out that that's the torque spec for the top ...

  17. Owner's manual

    Torque specifications should be used to make sure you do not over- or under-tighten a fastener. Over-tightening does not provide extra holding power and may actually lead to component damage or breakage. ... Typically torque specs are printed right onto Trek components. Look for a number with Nm printed after, for example, "4 Nm max." (For ...

  18. Torque Specs for Dual Sport 3 Gen 5 : r/TrekBikes

    The official community of Trek bike riders around the world. Members Online • KaPantsKey. ADMIN MOD Torque Specs for Dual Sport 3 Gen 5 . I simply cannot find the torque specs for this bike. It would be neat to see a manual that lists all the torque specs for the bike (e.g. something a shop would use to assemble). What I am currently after is

  19. Stem Torque Recommendation Needed

    Then I checked the old Trek manual that I have that was not a custom manual. It covers road and mountain bikes. Anyway, the threadless stem set bolt torque specifications in the Trek manual are almost 3 times as high! They specify 11.3 - 13.6 N*m. My concern is there is such a discrepancy is torque specifications between Trek and Specialized.

  20. Owners Manual

    2. Loosen the stem expander bolt two to three turns. 3. Tap the top of the stem expander bolt with a wood, rubber, or plastic faced mallet to loosen the stem wedge. 4. Adjust the handlebar to the desired height, making sure the minimum insertion line is inside the frame. 5. Align the stem with the top tube.

  21. Trek top cap max torque... really

    It's not a torque spec, its the max. Gravel Rocks. Trek Domane. Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike) Niner RLT9 RDO. BH G7 Disc. Trek Crockett. "The Spirit of the Party "serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one ...

  22. Recommended torque (NM) for water bottle cage bolts in a ...

    Purple is low-strength thread adhesive. It's known as loctite 222 on the packaging. Good for low torque applications where you want the bolts to stay put, but not have to apply significant force to break the bond later, or high torque applications that blue or red would be a danger for seizing the parts together(I.e. A track cog & lock ring)

  23. Velotric Summit 1 E-Bike review: The fast, lower-cost torque sensor

    Velotric Summit 1 tech specs. Motor: 750W (1,300W peak-rated) rear hub motor with 90Nm of torque; Top speed: 28 mph (50 km/h) ... a torque sensor is a beautiful piece of equipment to have.

  24. Madone SL 5 Gen 8

    See the bike and visit your local Trek retailer. Shop now! ... Find a detailed breakdown of your bike with part numbers, torque values, and platform-specific tech instructions below. ... Specs. Frame: 500 Series OCLV Carbon, Full System Foil tube shaping, IsoFlow seat tube, RCS Headset System, electronic or mechanical routing, removable aero ...