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Situation in Haiti April 5, 2024

U.s. citizens in haiti, update april 12, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

  • Travel Advisories |
  • Contact Us |
  • MyTravelGov |

Find U.S. Embassies & Consulates

Travel.state.gov, congressional liaison, special issuance agency, u.s. passports, international travel, intercountry adoption, international parental child abduction, records and authentications, popular links, travel advisories, mytravelgov, stay connected, legal resources, legal information, info for u.s. law enforcement, replace or certify documents.

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Indonesia Travel Advisory

Travel advisory july 24, 2023, indonesia - level 2: exercise increased caution.

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise increased caution in Indonesia due to  terrorism and natural disasters.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not travel to:

  • The provinces of Central Papua (Papua Tengah) and Highland Papua (Papua Pegunungan) due to civil unrest.

Terrorists continue plotting possible attacks in Indonesia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting police stations, places of worship, hotels, bars, nightclubs, markets/shopping malls, and restaurants.

Natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis or volcanic eruptions may result in disruptions to transportation, infrastructure, sanitation, and the availability of health services.

Demonstrations occur frequently and have the potential to become violent.  Avoid demonstrations and crowds. 

Indonesia’s revised criminal code, which takes effect January 2026, includes penalties for defamation, blasphemy, cohabitation, and sex outside of marriage. It is unclear how Indonesian authorities will implement the revised criminal code.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Indonesia.  

If you decide to travel to Indonesia:

  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans. 
  • Visit the websites for  Badan Geologi  (Indonesian Geological Agency, Indonesian language only) for the latest information from the Government of Indonesia on current natural disasters.
  • Review the  CDC’s suggestions on how to prepare for natural disasters.
  • Be aware of your personal safety and security at all times. 
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program  ( STEP ) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Ensure your passport is valid for at least six months beyond your intended stay.
  • Follow the Department of State Facebook  and Twitter .  Follow the U.S. Embassy Jakarta on Facebook , Instagram , and Twitter .
  • Review the Country Security Report  for Indonesia.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .

Central Papua and Highland Papua– Level 4: Do Not Travel

In Central Papua and Highland Papua, violent demonstrations and conflict could result in injury or death to U.S. citizens. Avoid demonstrations and crowds. Armed separatists may kidnap foreign nationals.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Central Papua and Highland Papua as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization before traveling to those areas.

Travel Advisory Levels

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Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

  • Packing List

After Your Trip

Map - Indonesia

Be aware of current health issues in Indonesia. Learn how to protect yourself.

Level 2 Practice Enhanced Precautions

  • Global Polio January 05, 2024 Some international destinations have circulating poliovirus. Before any international travel, make sure you are up to date on your polio vaccines. Destination List: Afghanistan, Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Guinea, Indonesia, Israel, including the West Bank and Gaza, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Republic of the Congo, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, including Zanzibar, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Level 1 Practice Usual Precautions

  • Global Measles March 22, 2024 Many international destinations are reporting increased numbers of cases of measles. Destination List: Afghanistan, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malaysia, Mauritania, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Qatar, Republic of South Sudan, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Togo, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Yemen, Zambia

⇧ Top

Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Indonesia.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers of all ages traveling to Indonesia.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

Japanese Encephalitis

Recommended for travelers who

  • Are moving to an area with Japanese encephalitis to live
  • Spend long periods of time, such as a month or more, in areas with Japanese encephalitis
  • Frequently travel to areas with Japanese encephalitis

Consider vaccination for travelers

  • Spending less than a month in areas with Japanese encephalitis but will be doing activities that increase risk of infection, such as visiting rural areas, hiking or camping, or staying in places without air conditioning, screens, or bed nets
  • Going to areas with Japanese encephalitis who are uncertain of their activities or how long they will be there

Not recommended for travelers planning short-term travel to urban areas or travel to areas with no clear Japanese encephalitis season. 

Japanese encephalitis - CDC Yellow Book

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine for US Children

CDC recommends that travelers going to certain areas of Indonesia take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. Talk to your doctor about which malaria medication you should take.

Find  country-specific information  about malaria.

Malaria - CDC Yellow Book

Considerations when choosing a drug for malaria prophylaxis (CDC Yellow Book)

Malaria information for Indonesia.

Cases of measles are on the rise worldwide. Travelers are at risk of measles if they have not been fully vaccinated at least two weeks prior to departure, or have not had measles in the past, and travel internationally to areas where measles is spreading.

All international travelers should be fully vaccinated against measles with the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, including an early dose for infants 6–11 months, according to  CDC’s measles vaccination recommendations for international travel .

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

In Indonesia poliovirus has been identified in the past year.

Travelers to Indonesia are at increased risk of exposure to poliovirus.

Vaccine recommendations : Adults traveling to Indonesia who received a complete polio vaccination series as children may receive a single lifetime booster dose of inactivated polio vaccine; travelers who are unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated should receive a complete polio vaccination series before travel. Children who are not fully vaccinated will be considered for an  accelerated vaccination schedule .

Polio - CDC Yellow Book

Polio: For Travelers

Rabid dogs are commonly found in Indonesia. If you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other mammal while in Indonesia, there may be limited or no rabies treatment available. 

Consider rabies vaccination before your trip if your activities mean you will be around dogs or wildlife.

Travelers more likely to encounter rabid animals include

  • Campers, adventure travelers, or cave explorers (spelunkers)
  • Veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers handling animal specimens
  • Visitors to rural areas

Since children are more likely to be bitten or scratched by a dog or other animals, consider rabies vaccination for children traveling to Indonesia. 

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Yellow Fever

Required for travelers ≥9 months old arriving from countries with risk for YF virus transmission. 1

Yellow Fever - CDC Yellow Book

  • Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Schistosomiasis

  • Wading, swimming, bathing, or washing in contaminated freshwater streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, or untreated pools.

Avoid bug bites

Chikungunya

  • Mosquito bite
  • Avoid Bug Bites
  • Mosquito bite
  • An infected pregnant woman can spread it to her unborn baby

Airborne & droplet

Avian/bird flu.

  • Being around, touching, or working with infected poultry, such as visiting poultry farms or live-animal markets
  • Avoid domestic and wild poultry
  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Indonesia, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the Department of State Country Information Pages for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Indonesia. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Indonesia include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Schistosomiasis, a parasitic infection that can be spread in fresh water, is found in Indonesia. Avoid swimming in fresh, unchlorinated water, such as lakes, ponds, or rivers.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Indonesia’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Malaria is a risk in some parts of Indonesia. If you are going to a risk area, fill your malaria prescription before you leave, and take enough with you for the entire length of your trip. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking the pills; some need to be started before you leave.

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Indonesia may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Indonesia, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

For information traffic safety and road conditions in Indonesia, see Travel and Transportation on US Department of State's country-specific information for Indonesia .

Traffic flows on the left side of the road in Indonesia.

  • Always pay close attention to the flow of traffic, especially when crossing the street.
  • LOOK RIGHT for approaching traffic.

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Indonesia for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

If your doctor prescribed antimalarial medicine for your trip, keep taking the rest of your pills after you return home. If you stop taking your medicine too soon, you could still get sick.

Malaria is always a serious disease and may be a deadly illness. If you become ill with a fever either while traveling in a malaria-risk area or after you return home (for up to 1 year), you should seek immediate medical attention and should tell the doctor about your travel history.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

Map Disclaimer - The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on maps do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement are generally marked.

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clock This article was published more than  2 years ago

After a year without tourists, Bali will reopen for foreign travel in February

Vacations to the tropical island in indonesia will include a 5-day quarantine for fully vaccinated travelers.

indonesia state department travel advisory

Indonesian officials announced Monday that Bali will reopen to all foreign visitors this week, hoping to court them back to an island destination that saw virtually no tourism in 2021 amid strict travel restrictions.

Luhut Pandjaitan, the coordinating minister for maritime affairs and investment, said at a news briefing that beginning Friday, the country will welcome foreigners and reduce the quarantine period for fully vaccinated travelers from seven to five days upon arrival.

The move expands on a limited policy that excluded U.S. visitors from the picturesque island destination in Southeast Asia. Indonesia began allowing international flights to Bali from 19 countries — including China, India, France and South Korea — in mid-October.

Singapore Airlines announced it will also resume trips from Singapore to Bali beginning Feb. 16.

The most popular destinations for 2022 travel, according to experts

The announcement comes as Indonesia has seen an uptick in coronavirus cases. According to tracking data compiled by The Washington Post, through Monday, the country had 1,609 reported cases per 100,000 residents, with a 236 percent increase in daily cases over the past seven days.

Even with that rise, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention rates Indonesia with a Level 1 travel advisory, indicating a “low” level of the coronavirus. The agency does recommend travelers be up to date on their vaccinations, including a booster shot when eligible, before traveling.

The U.S. State Department has issued a Level 4 travel advisory for Indonesia, its highest, warning travelers of potential terrorism and natural disasters.

Bali, a popular travel destination where many locals rely on income from on tourism, was hit hard by the pandemic. With its airport closed to international flights for the majority of 2021, the island saw just 45 foreign visitors between January and October, compared with around 1.05 million in 2020 and 6.2 million in 2019, CNN reported.

Before Bali lifted its international flight ban in October, visitors arrived by yacht. In the first six weeks of reopening, only 153 people had applied for tourist visas, according to an Al Jazeera report .

Indonesia’s announcement about Bali comes as other parts of Asia are also reopening . Thailand will resume accepting applications from visitors as part of its “Test and Go Program” on Feb. 1 after an omicron-induced suspension, and the Philippines will welcome vaccinated tourists and travelers on business with no quarantine rule starting Feb. 10.

indonesia state department travel advisory

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COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

Indonesia travel advice

Latest updates: The Need help? section was updated.

Last updated: April 12, 2024 09:05 ET

On this page

Safety and security, entry and exit requirements, laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, indonesia - exercise a high degree of caution.

Exercise a high degree of caution in Indonesia due to political and social tensions and the threat of terrorism throughout the country.

Indonesian Papua - Avoid non-essential travel

Avoid non-essential travel to all the provinces of Indonesia Papua due to the regular occurrence of violent incidents, threats made against foreigners by militant groups and risk of kidnapping.

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  • Indonesian Papua

Political tension and regular violent incidents continue to occur in Indonesian Papua.

In February 2023, militant groups threatened to attack and take hostages, specifically referencing foreigners. You may also face increased threats of violence or kidnapping if you travel to Indonesian Papua.

Labour disputes at the Freeport-McMoRan mine near Timika have led to demonstrations, public transportation disruptions and violence.

Fatal attacks have occurred on roads near the mine. Foreigners have been targeted by local militants.

There is a heightened police and military presence in this area.

There is a threat of terrorism in Indonesia.

While effective counterterrorism measures by Indonesian authorities are in place, terrorist cells are active and have the capacity to carry out attacks throughout the country.

Attacks have targeted:

  • military and government facilities
  • tourist attractions and popular public places
  • nightclubs and entertainment venues
  • public transportation

Further attacks are likely, and terrorists may also target:

  • crowded places
  • places with high pedestrian traffic and where foreigners may gather
  • commercial establishments
  • local government offices
  • public transit stations
  • busy streets
  • long lineups at tourist attractions
  • places of worship

Stay at hotels that have robust security measures, including metal detectors, guards and security cameras. Keep in mind, however, that even the most secure locations cannot be considered completely free of risk.

Be particularly vigilant during religious holidays and other public celebrations, as terrorists have used such occasions to mount attacks.

  • Always be aware of your surroundings when in public places and identify ways to leave the area in case of emergency
  • Monitor local media
  • Follow the instructions of the local authorities

Violent crime

Violent crime, such as armed robberies, occurs regularly. Be particularly cautious on the road from Banda Aceh to Medan, where armed robberies have occurred.

Foreigners travelling alone and those travelling at night are at particular risk.

Standards of police services differ considerably from those in Canada.

  • Avoid showing signs of affluence
  • Ensure that your personal belongings, including your passport and other travel documents, are secure at all times
  • If you’re travelling by car, keep valuable belongings out of sight, windows closed and doors locked

Petty crime

Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and purse snatching, occurs throughout Indonesia, specifically in tourist areas, such as Bali and Lombok. Criminals sometimes force people to withdraw cash from ATMs.

Merchants don’t always honour pricing agreements. Use good judgment in engaging services of tourist guides, especially in places that tourists rarely visit.

There is a threat of kidnapping, particularly in the provinces of Indonesian Papua and Aceh province. Foreign travellers have been kidnapped and killed. Terrorist groups have also kidnapped tourists in East and West Kalimantan.

  • Be extra vigilant if travelling in these areas
  • Avoid travelling alone and after dusk
  • Use varied routes and schedules when moving from one place to another

Women's safety

Women travelling alone may face some forms of harassment and verbal abuse.

Advice for women travellers

Demonstrations

Demonstrations take place from time to time. Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

Mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Political and social tension

There are long-standing sectarian and social tensions throughout Indonesia, particularly in the provinces of:

  • Central Sulawesi, in Palu, Poso and Tentena
  • Maluku, especially in Ambon

Sectarian violence targeting civilians has occurred. The potential for violence remains, despite ongoing security operations efforts from local authorities. Be aware of your surroundings.

There is a very high rate of credit and debit card fraud in Indonesia, including online fraud.

 When using debit or credit cards:

  • pay careful attention if other people are handling your cards
  • use ATMs located in public areas or inside a bank or business
  • avoid using card readers with an irregular or unusual feature
  • cover the keypad with one hand when entering your PIN
  • check for any unauthorized transactions on your account statements

Romance scams

If you’re travelling to Indonesia to meet someone you’ve only met online, keep it mind that you may be the victim of a scam. Be wary of unsolicited emails or requests for a wire transfer.

Don’t send money to someone you have never met in person.

Overseas fraud

Spiked food and drinks

Even if the wrapping or container appears intact, snacks, beverages, gum and cigarettes may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

  • Be wary of accepting these items from new acquaintances
  • Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers

People have died after drinking methanol-adulterated alcohol. Counterfeits of well-known alcohol brands often contain dangerous amounts of methanol. Poisoning incidents have happened at hotels, bars, and shops in tourist areas like Bali, Lombok, the Gili Islands and Sumatra.

  • Be cautious if you choose to drink alcohol
  • Be wary of lesser-known or illegal brands
  • Avoid buying alcohol from individuals
  • Seek medical assistance if you begin to feel sick

Alcohol, drugs and travel

Road safety

Road conditions and road safety vary greatly throughout the country. Driving conditions may be hazardous during the rainy season.

Road travel in Indonesia can be very challenging due to:

  • reckless driving
  • perilous road conditions
  • inadequate lighting
  • poor signage
  • high traffic congestion

If you plan to rent a car, consider hiring a driver.

Avoid driving after dark outside of major cities or major roads as some drivers do not use lights.

You may face mob anger if you are involved in an accident that causes serious injury. In such cases, remain in your vehicle and wait for a police officer to arrive.

Motorcycles and scooters

Motorcycle and scooter accidents are the main cause of death and serious injury among foreigners visiting many parts of Indonesia, including Bali.

Rental motorcycles are also often targeted and stolen. In such cases, you may have to pay the replacement cost for a new motorcycle.

Public transport

Public transport can be crowded and safety standards are poor. Many remote parts of Indonesia have poor transportation networks.

Crashes involving overcrowded buses are common. Large buses are generally available only on Java. Minibuses are available elsewhere.

If you choose to travel by bus,

  • keep in mind that minibus drivers may try to overcharge foreigners
  • keep your belongings secure due to pickpocketing

The condition of taxis varies. Foreign travellers using taxis have been victims of armed robbery, either by the driver or other passengers.

  • Pre-arrange transportation with a safe and reliable taxi company
  • Only use a taxi company whose vehicles are equipped with a meter
  • Never enter a cab if it already has one or more passengers
  • Don’t hail taxis off the street and avoid using unmarked taxi services

Reliable taxis are available from Bluebird, Thunderbird and Express. Be careful of “lookalike” taxis from competitors.

Ferry accidents are common and are often caused by poor safety practices or extreme weather conditions.

If you choose to travel by ferry:

  • make sure the vessel you are boarding is carrying appropriate safety equipment and that life jackets are provided for all passengers and accessible at all times
  • don’t board vessels that appear overloaded or unseaworthy
  • verify the safety standards of ferries with your tour operator

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

Information about foreign domestic airlines

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Indonesian authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the  Foreign Representatives in Canada .

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the date of entry into Indonesia and must contain at least one blank page for the placement of the Indonesian visa or entry stamp.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Useful links

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada
  • Canadian passports

Tourist visa: required Business visa: required Social-cultural visit visa: required

Indonesia strictly enforces its immigration and visa requirements. Foreign travellers have been detained in immigration detention centres for visa violations or overstays. Those in violation may be subject to substantial fines and deportation.

A round-trip or onward airline ticket is required to obtain all types of visas.

Tourist visa

If you are travelling for tourism with a regular Canadian passport, you may obtain a visa in advance or on arrival at select points of entry.

Business and social-cultural visas

If you are travelling to Indonesia for business or social-cultural purposes (e.g. volunteer work), you must obtain a visa prior to your arrival. You must provide a letter from both the sponsoring organization in Indonesia and the sending organization in Canada to obtain your visa.

A business or social-cultural single-entry visa is extendable from within Indonesia.

Aid workers

Aid workers must have a sponsor in Indonesia to obtain a visa. Those going to Aceh also require prior authorization from the Directorate General of Immigration in Aceh or Jakarta.

Journalists

Journalists visiting Indonesia for reporting and filming purposes must obtain authorization from the Directorate General of Immigration in Jakarta before applying for a visa.

Directorate General of Immigration  – Ministry of Law and Human Rights of Indonesia

Restricted areas

You must obtain a permit to travel to Indonesian Papua.

Entry regulations and permission to remain in Indonesian  Papua may change at any time.

Other entry requirements

Starting February 14, 2024, tourists entering Bali will be subject to a new tax, the Love Bali Tourist Levy. This fee will be in addition to the visa fees paid to enter Indonesia.

If your are travelling to Bali, you must pay directly though the Provincial Government of Bali website.

Levy for Foreign Tourists – Provincial Government of Bali

Customs officials may ask you to show them a return or onward ticket and proof of sufficient funds to cover your stay.

Children and travel

Learn more about travelling with children .

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Relevant Travel Health Notices

  • Global Measles Notice - 13 March, 2024
  • Zika virus: Advice for travellers - 31 August, 2023
  • COVID-19 and International Travel - 13 March, 2024
  • Polio: Advice for travellers - 4 January, 2024
  • Mpox (monkeypox): Advice for travellers - 20 February, 2024
  • Dengue: Advice for travellers - 8 April, 2024

This section contains information on possible health risks and restrictions regularly found or ongoing in the destination. Follow this advice to lower your risk of becoming ill while travelling. Not all risks are listed below.

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel to get personalized health advice and recommendations.

Routine vaccines

Be sure that your  routine vaccinations , as per your province or territory , are up-to-date before travelling, regardless of your destination.

Some of these vaccinations include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary. 

Yellow fever   is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is required if you are coming from a country   where yellow fever occurs.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.
  • Discuss travel plans, activities, and destinations with a health care professional.
  • Contact a designated  Yellow Fever Vaccination Centre  well in advance of your trip to arrange for vaccination.

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centre

* It is important to note that  country entry requirements  may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest  diplomatic or consular office  of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

There is a risk of hepatitis A in this destination. It is a disease of the liver. People can get hepatitis A if they ingest contaminated food or water, eat foods prepared by an infectious person, or if they have close physical contact (such as oral-anal sex) with an infectious person, although casual contact among people does not spread the virus.

Practise  safe food and water precautions and wash your hands often. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers to areas where hepatitis A is present.

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

Japanese encephalitis is a viral infection that can cause swelling of the brain.  It is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Risk is very low for most travellers. Travellers at relatively higher risk may want to consider vaccination for JE prior to travelling.

Travellers are at higher risk if they will be:

  • travelling long term (e.g. more than 30 days)
  • making multiple trips to endemic areas
  • staying for extended periods in rural areas
  • visiting an area suffering a JE outbreak
  • engaging in activities involving high contact with mosquitos (e.g., entomologists)

  Hepatitis B is a risk in every destination. It is a viral liver disease that is easily transmitted from one person to another through exposure to blood and body fluids containing the hepatitis B virus.  Travellers who may be exposed to blood or other bodily fluids (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) are at higher risk of getting hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all travellers. Prevent hepatitis B infection by practicing safe sex, only using new and sterile drug equipment, and only getting tattoos and piercings in settings that follow public health regulations and standards.

 The best way to protect yourself from seasonal influenza (flu) is to get vaccinated every year. Get the flu shot at least 2 weeks before travelling.  

 The flu occurs worldwide. 

  •  In the Northern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs from November to   April.
  •  In the Southern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs between April and   October.
  •  In the tropics, there is flu activity year round. 

The flu vaccine available in one hemisphere may only offer partial protection against the flu in the other hemisphere.

The flu virus spreads from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Clean your hands often and wear a mask if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms.

Malaria  is a serious and sometimes fatal disease that is caused by parasites spread through the bites of mosquitoes.   There is a risk of malaria in certain areas and/or during a certain time of year in this destination. 

Antimalarial medication may be recommended depending on your itinerary and the time of year you are travelling. Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic before travelling to discuss your options. It is recommended to do this 6 weeks before travel, however, it is still a good idea any time before leaving.    Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times:  • Cover your skin and use an approved insect repellent on uncovered skin.  • Exclude mosquitoes from your living area with screening and/or closed, well-sealed doors and windows. • Use insecticide-treated bed nets if mosquitoes cannot be excluded from your living area.  • Wear permethrin-treated clothing.    If you develop symptoms similar to malaria when you are travelling or up to a year after you return home, see a health care professional immediately. Tell them where you have been travelling or living. 

In this destination, rabies is commonly carried by dogs and some wildlife, including bats. Rabies is a deadly disease that spreads to humans primarily through bites or scratches from an infected animal. While travelling, take precautions , including keeping your distance from animals (including free-roaming dogs), and closely supervising children.

If you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other animal while travelling, immediately wash the wound with soap and clean water and see a health care professional. In this destination, rabies treatment may be limited or may not be available, therefore you may need to return to Canada for treatment.  

Before travel, discuss rabies vaccination with a health care professional. It may be recommended for travellers who are at high risk of exposure (e.g., occupational risk such as veterinarians and wildlife workers, children, adventure travellers and spelunkers, and others in close contact with animals). 

Polio (poliomyelitis) is an infectious disease that can be prevented by vaccination. It is caused by poliovirus type 1, 2 or 3. Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus 2 (cVDPV2) is present in this country. Polio is spread from person to person and through contaminated food and water. Infection with the polio virus can cause paralysis and death in individuals of any age who are not immune.

Recommendations:

  • Be sure that your polio vaccinations are up to date before travelling. Polio is part of the routine vaccine schedule for children in Canada.
  • One booster dose of the polio vaccine is recommended as an adult .

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

Before travelling, verify your destination’s COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

Safe food and water precautions

Many illnesses can be caused by eating food or drinking beverages contaminated by bacteria, parasites, toxins, or viruses, or by swimming or bathing in contaminated water.

  • Learn more about food and water precautions to take to avoid getting sick by visiting our eat and drink safely abroad page. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!
  • Avoid getting water into your eyes, mouth or nose when swimming or participating in activities in freshwater (streams, canals, lakes), particularly after flooding or heavy rain. Water may look clean but could still be polluted or contaminated.
  • Avoid inhaling or swallowing water while bathing, showering, or swimming in pools or hot tubs. 

Travellers' diarrhea is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.

Risk of developing travellers' diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.

The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Typhoid   is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among children, travellers going to rural areas, travellers visiting friends and relatives or those travelling for a long period of time.

Travellers visiting regions with a risk of typhoid, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation, should speak to a health care professional about vaccination.  

There is a risk of schistosomiasis in this destination. Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by tiny worms (blood flukes) which can be found in freshwater (lakes, rivers, ponds, and wetlands). The worms can break the skin, and their eggs can cause stomach pain, diarrhea, flu-like symptoms, or urinary problems. Schistosomiasis mostly affects underdeveloped and r ural communities, particularly agricultural and fishing communities.

Most travellers are at low risk. Travellers should avoid contact with untreated freshwater such as lakes, rivers, and ponds (e.g., swimming, bathing, wading, ingesting). There is no vaccine or medication available to prevent infection.

Insect bite prevention

Many diseases are spread by the bites of infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. When travelling to areas where infected insects may be present:

  • Use insect repellent (bug spray) on exposed skin
  • Cover up with light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • Minimize exposure to insects
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in buildings that are not fully enclosed

To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of infection and disease caused by bites, both at home and abroad, visit our insect bite prevention page.

Find out what types of insects are present where you’re travelling, when they’re most active, and the symptoms of the diseases they spread.

There is a risk of chikungunya in this country.  The risk may vary between regions of a country.  Chikungunya is a virus spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. Chikungunya can cause a viral disease that typically causes fever and pain in the joints. In some cases, the joint pain can be severe and last for months or years.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times. There is no vaccine available for chikungunya.

Lymphatic filariasis , also known as elephantiasis, is caused by filariae (tiny worms) spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can cause a range of illnesses. Risk is generally low for most travellers. Protect yourself from mosquito bites. There is no vaccine available for lymphatic filariasis although drug treatments exist.

  • In this country,   dengue  is a risk to travellers. It is a viral disease spread to humans by mosquito bites.
  • Dengue can cause flu-like symptoms. In some cases, it can lead to severe dengue, which can be fatal.
  • The level of risk of dengue changes seasonally, and varies from year to year. The level of risk also varies between regions in a country and can depend on the elevation in the region.
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue typically bite during the daytime, particularly around sunrise and sunset.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites . There is no vaccine or medication that protects against dengue.

Zika virus is a risk in this country. 

Zika virus is primarily spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can also be sexually transmitted. Zika virus can cause serious birth defects.

During your trip:

  • Prevent mosquito bites at all times.
  • Use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact, particularly if you are pregnant.

If you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, you should discuss the potential risks of travelling to this destination with your health care provider. You may choose to avoid or postpone travel. 

For more information, see Zika virus: Pregnant or planning a pregnancy.

Animal precautions

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. Certain types of activities may increase your chance of contact with animals, such as travelling in rural or forested areas, camping, hiking, and visiting wet markets (places where live animals are slaughtered and sold) or caves.

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats, and to avoid eating undercooked wild game.

Closely supervise children, as they are more likely to come in contact with animals.

Human cases of avian influenza have been reported in this destination. Avian influenza   is a viral infection that can spread quickly and easily among birds and in rare cases it can infect mammals, including people. The risk is low for most travellers.

Avoid contact with birds, including wild, farm, and backyard birds (alive or dead) and surfaces that may have bird droppings on them. Ensure all poultry dishes, including eggs and wild game, are properly cooked.

Travellers with a higher risk of exposure include those: 

  • visiting live bird/animal markets or poultry farms
  • working with poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, domestic ducks)
  • hunting, de-feathering, field dressing and butchering wild birds and wild mammals
  • working with wild birds for activities such as research, conservation, or rehabilitation
  • working with wild mammals, especially those that eat wild birds (e.g., foxes)

All eligible people are encouraged to get the seasonal influenza shot, which will protect them against human influenza viruses. While the seasonal influenza shot does not prevent infection with avian influenza, it can reduce the chance of getting sick with human and avian influenza viruses at the same time.

Person-to-person infections

Stay home if you’re sick and practise proper cough and sneeze etiquette , which includes coughing or sneezing into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand. Reduce your risk of colds, the flu and other illnesses by:

  •   washing your hands often
  • avoiding or limiting the amount of time spent in closed spaces, crowded places, or at large-scale events (concerts, sporting events, rallies)
  • avoiding close physical contact with people who may be showing symptoms of illness 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) , HIV , and mpox are spread through blood and bodily fluids; use condoms, practise safe sex, and limit your number of sexual partners. Check with your local public health authority pre-travel to determine your eligibility for mpox vaccine.  

Tuberculosis is an infection caused by bacteria and usually affects the lungs.

For most travellers the risk of tuberculosis is low.

Travellers who may be at high risk while travelling in regions with risk of tuberculosis should discuss pre- and post-travel options with a health care professional.

High-risk travellers include those visiting or working in prisons, refugee camps, homeless shelters, or hospitals, or travellers visiting friends and relatives.

Medical services and facilities

Heath care is inadequate.

Most medical staff don’t speak English or French. You may have to pay in advance, in cash, to obtain medical services.

Medical evacuation can be very expensive and you may need it in case of serious illness or injury.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad .

Overview of the criminal law system in Indonesia  

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences. They can also be detained for long periods, without the possibility of release on bail, while police conduct investigations prior to prosecution.

Police have arrested tourists after random drug testing throughout the country.

Drugs, alcohol and travel

Some prescription and over-the-counter medications that are legal in Canada, such as those containing morphine and codeine, are classified as controlled substances in Indonesia. It’s illegal to bring them into the country, even in small quantities, without prior permission from the Indonesian Ministry of Health and the required documentation.

If you attempt to bring banned pharmaceuticals into Indonesia without prior authorization and proper documentation, Indonesian authorities may confiscate them. You may also be subject to fines and imprisonment.

In some areas, Islamic practices and beliefs closely adhere to local customs, laws and regulations.

Religious police enforce sharia law in Aceh. Specific applications of sharia may differ by region and apply to non-Muslims as well.

Be aware of the relevant provisions specifically related to the region, regardless of your religion.

Dress and behaviour

To avoid offending local sensitivities:

  • dress conservatively
  • behave discreetly
  • respect religious and social traditions

In 2024, the lunar month of Ramadan is expected to begin on or around March 10.

In public, between sunrise and sunset, be discreet when:

2SLGBTQI+ travellers

Indonesian national law doesn’t criminalize sexual acts or relationships between persons of the same sex. However, they are prohibited and punishable under local laws in some provinces.

In Aceh, Sharia law is enforced and sexual acts between Muslim individuals of the same sex is punished by caning. They could also face arrest under charges related to immoral behaviour, prostitution or social ills.

2SLGBTQI+ travellers could be discriminated against based on their sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression or sex characteristics.

2SLGBTQI+ individuals should carefully consider the risks of travelling to Indonesia.

Travel and your sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics

Dual citizenship 

Dual citizenship is not legally recognized in Indonesia.

If local authorities consider you a citizen of Indonesia, they may refuse to grant you access to Canadian consular services. This will prevent us from providing you with those services.

Indonesia allows minors to carry dual citizenship until the age of 18. After this time, they must choose between their Indonesian citizenship and foreign citizenship.

General information for travellers with dual citizenship

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. It does not apply between Canada and Indonesia.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Indonesia by an abducting parent:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Indonesia to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children’s Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre.

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country’s judicial affairs.

  • International Child Abduction: A Guidebook for Left-Behind Parents
  • Travelling with children
  • Canadian embassies and consulates by destination
  • Emergency Watch and Response Centre

Imports and exports

Local customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary import or export of items such as audiovisual material.

Gambling is illegal in Indonesia.

Identification

You must carry adequate identification, such as your passport and your stay permit, at all times.

You may be detained and fined if you don’t have the original on you.

Traffic drives on the left.

You must carry an International Driving Permit along with your Canadian driver’s licence.

If you got your International Driving Permit outside of Indonesia, local authorities may ask to approve it.

If you’re involved in an accident, you must stop and exchange information with and provide assistance to other drivers.

  • International Driving Permit registration  – Traffic Police, Government of Indonesia (in Indonesian)
  • More about the International Driving Permit

The currency is the rupiah (IDR).

Credit cards are not widely accepted outside of large urban centres and tourist areas.

Carry cash when visiting remote areas.

Earthquake in the Java Sea

On March 22, 2024, a 6.4 magnitude earthquake occurred near Bawean Island in the Java Sea, resulting in damage to infrastructure and some casualties.

Transportation and access to essential services could also be disrupted in. Aftershocks may occur.

If you’re in or around the affected areas:

  • monitor local media for the latest information
  • follow the instructions of local authorities

Indonesia is located in a very active seismic zone. It's prone to a multitude of natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis, flooding, volcanic eruptions and drought.

Earthquakes and tsunamis

Each year, Indonesia experiences thousands of earthquakes. Some trigger tsunamis and cause significant damage. Deaths and injuries occasionally occur.

A tsunami can occur within minutes of a nearby earthquake. However, the risk of tsunami can remain for several hours following the first tremor. If you're staying on the coast, familiarize yourself with the region's evacuation plans in the event of a tsunami warning.

  • Earthquakes  - What to Do?
  • Tsunami alerts - U.S. Tsunami Warning System

Indonesia has 129 active volcanoes and periodically experiences major volcanic events that can be dangerous, even life-threatening. Ash clouds can disrupt air travel, including on the island of Bali, and cause or worsen respiratory problems.

Active volcanoes are monitored to provide residents with an early warning should unusual activity occur. Local authorities can raise alert levels and order evacuations on short notice.

If you are near active volcanoes:

  • take official warnings seriously and respect exclusion zones
  • monitor local media to stay up-to-date on latest developments
  • follow the advice of local authorities, including evacuation orders
  • be prepared to modify your travel arrangements or even evacuate the area on short notice
  • National Disaster Management Authority
  • Map of active volcanoes in Indonesia – MAGMA Indonesia

Rainy season

The rainy season extends from November to March, but heavy rains are common throughout the year. Flooding and landslides can occur with little warning, especially in remote areas where extensive deforestation is common, but also in major cities, including Jakarta. Such incidents have led to fatalities and destruction of property.

Seasonal flooding can hamper overland travel and reduce the provision of essential services. Roads may become impassable and bridges damaged.

  • Be aware of health risks associated with flood waters
  • Keep informed of regional weather forecasts as well as road closures or detours
  • Avoid disaster areas
  • Follow the advice of local authorities

Tornadoes, cyclones, hurricanes, typhoons and monsoons

Air pollution

Unrestricted burning in Sumatra and Kalimantan sometimes causes air pollution to rise to unhealthy levels, especially from June to October.

Monitor air pollution levels closely, as they change quickly.

During periods of high pollution:

  • limit your activities outdoors
  • monitor local media

Local services

In case of emergency, dial 110 for police.

Research and carry contact information for local medical facilities.

Consular assistance

Timor-Leste

There is no Canadian government office in Bali. You can obtain consular assistance from the Australian Consulate General of Australia, in Bali, under the Canada-Australia Consular Services Sharing Agreement.

Sign up to receive email updates from the Australian government on situations and events that could affect your safety while in Bali.

Smartraveller  - Australian travel advice

For emergency consular assistance, call the Embassy of Canada to Indonesia, in Jakarta, and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

Indonesian Flag

Last verified: Saturday, 13. April 2024 at 08:24 AM

Indonesia Travel Advisory

  • South-Eastern Asia
  • Indonesia Travel Advice

We advise caution when travelling to Indonesia

Local situation: 3.4 / 5.

We advise caution when travelling to Indonesia. We detected travel advisories from 7 sources for this specific country.

Regional Situation: 3.3 / 5

Indonesia shares a land border with 3 neighbouring states. For this region of countries (including Indonesia), the Advisory Index is 3.3 (average value over all countries). All countries have some reported advisories: Papua New Guinea (3.8), East Timor with 3.2 and Malaysia with 2.8 (of 5).

Current informationen on Covid-19 in Indonesia

There are currently no officially reported cases of infections with SARS-CoV-2 (or Coronavirus) in Indonesia. As reported by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control this morning (~8:30am CET).

There are currently no officially reported deaths related to this disease in Indonesia.

Source: www.ecdc.europa.eu

Advice scoring history for Indonesia

Chart of the risk level over that last 200 days. This is the daily calculated travel risk for Indonesia.

Chart of the number of sources over that last 200 days. This is the daily number of advisory sources (of any rating) that have been active on that day.

Note: Changes happening on the 28th/29th of July 2019 are related to a change in the software and number of sources processed.

Rating Details (single travel warnings)

These are the individual advisories published by other countries about the destination Indonesia from a travellers perspective. The scoring of all messages combined is the foundation for the current rating 3.4 out of 5.0 .

Warning Level Icon

This is the general advisory usually covering the country as a whole.

Advisory issued by: New Zealand

Flag of New Zealand

Exercise increased caution elsewhere in Indonesia, including in Jakarta, Surabaya, elsewhere in Sulawesi and in Bali, due to the ongoing threat of terrorism (level 2 of 4).

Source: https://www.safetravel.govt.nz/indonesia

indonesia state department travel advisory

This is a regional information covering specific areas of Indonesia.

Issued by: New Zealand government

Info: If you are planning international travel at this time, please read our COVID-19 related travel advice here, alongside our destination specific travel advice below.

indonesia state department travel advisory

Info: Avoid non-essential travel to Papua, South Papua, Central Papua, Highland Papua and West Papua provinces due to civil unrest and the risk of kidnapping (level 3 of 4). Avoid non-essential travel to Poso regency in Central Sulawesi due to the risk of terrorism (level 3 of 4).

Advisory issued by: United States

Flag of United States

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed. Exercise increased caution in Indonesia due to terrorism and natural disasters. Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory. Do Not travel to: The provinces of Central Papua (Papua Tengah) and Highland Papua (Papua Pegunungan) due to civil unrest. Terrorists continue plotting ...

Source: http://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories/indonesia-travel-advisory.html

Advisory issued by: Canada

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The Canadian goverment suggests: Exercise a high degree of caution (with regional advisories)

Source: https://travel.gc.ca/destinations/indonesia

Warning Level Icon

Advisory issued by: Finland

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Iaktta särskild försiktighet - Risk för terrordåd. Undvik stora folksamlingar. Mycket naturkatastrofer.

Source: https://um.fi/resemeddelande/-/c/ID

Individual rating changes for Indonesia

This is the recent history of individual changes of travel advices that affected the total asessment of Indonesia. Most recent events first.

Changes from August 8th 2020

The total rating for Indonesia changed from 3.9 to 4.0 . Here are the influencing details:

Flag of United States

The United States government increased their existing warning for Indonesia to 5.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 4.0 (by +1.0).

Changes from August 7th 2020

The total rating for Indonesia changed from 4.0 to 3.9 . Here are the influencing details:

The United States government decreased their existing warning for Indonesia to 4.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 5.0 (by -1.0).

Changes from April 9th 2020

Flag of Austria

The Austrian government issued a new warning for Indonesia with a rating of 5.0.

Changes from March 27th 2020

The total rating for Indonesia changed from 3.4 to 3.9 . Here are the influencing details:

The United States government increased their existing warning for Indonesia to 5.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 2.0 (by +3.0).

Changes from March 22nd 2020

The total rating for Indonesia changed from 3.1 to 3.4 . Here are the influencing details:

Flag of Canada

The Canadian government increased their existing warning for Indonesia to 4.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 2.0 (by +2.0).

Changes from March 18th 2020

The total rating for Indonesia changed from 3.0 to 3.1 . Here are the influencing details:

Flag of Australia

The Australian government increased their existing warning for Indonesia to 5.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 4.0 (by +1.0).

Changes from March 17th 2020

The total rating for Indonesia changed from 2.9 to 3.0 . Here are the influencing details:

Flag of Ireland

The Irish government increased their existing warning for Indonesia to 4.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 3.0 (by +1.0).

Changes from March 14th 2020

The total rating for Indonesia changed from 2.5 to 2.9 . Here are the influencing details:

The Australian government issued a new warning for Indonesia with a rating of 4.0.

Flag of Denmark

The Danish government increased their existing warning for Indonesia to 4.0 (of 5.0) from the previous rating of 3.0 (by +1.0).

Changes from September 25th 2019

The total rating for Indonesia changed from 0.0 to 0.0 . Here are the influencing details:

The United States government issued a new warning for Indonesia with a rating of 2.0.

The Canadian government issued a new warning for Indonesia with a rating of 2.0.

Flag of New Zealand

The New Zealand government issued a new warning for Indonesia with a rating of 2.0.

The Irish government issued a new warning for Indonesia with a rating of 3.0.

Flag of Finland

The Finnish government issued a new warning for Indonesia with a rating of 3.0.

The Danish government issued a new warning for Indonesia with a rating of 3.0.

About Indonesia

Indonesia with its capital Jakarta is a country in Asia (South-Eastern Asia), slightly less than three times the size of Texas (1,919,440 km²). The country is located Southeastern Asia, archipelago between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean. The climate can be described as tropical; hot, humid; more moderate in highlands. The landscape is mostly coastal lowlands; larger islands have interior mountains. With a population of about 237.51 million citizens.

Indonesian flag

Flag of Indonesia

Introduction Video

Basic Statistics and Facts

Environmental problems and natural hazzards.

These are problems Indonesia is facing. Environmental issues refer to damages of the nature due to industry and society. Natural hazzards refer to potential dangers originating in nature.

Environmental problems

  • air pollution in urban areas
  • deforestation
  • smoke and haze from forest fires
  • water pollution from industrial wastes

Natural hazzards

  • earthquakes
  • forest fires
  • Indonesia contains the most volcanoes of any country in the world - some 76 are historically active; significant volcanic activity occurs on Java, Sumatra, the Sunda Islands, Halmahera Island, Sulawesi Island, Sangihe Island, and in the Banda Sea; Merapi
  • occasional floods
  • severe droughts

Top Industries and Agricultural Products

These are the main product industries and agricultural products of Indonesia. This list indicates what this country is good at producing.

  • chemical fertilizers
  • electrical appliances
  • handicrafts
  • medical instruments

Agriculture products

  • essential oil
  • forest products
  • medicinal herbs

Indonesian Imports and Exports

These are the main product categories of imports and exports to and from Indonesia.

Export products

  • animal or vegetable fats (includes palm oil)
  • electrical machinery
  • mechanical appliance parts
  • mineral fuels

Import products

  • electric machinery
  • mechanical parts

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the current travel advisory for indonesia.

Indonesia is currently rated at 3,4 out of a possible 5.0. Collected from 7 official sources. We advise caution when travelling to Indonesia.

Is it safe to travel Indonesia in 2024?

Visiting the country Indonesia is usually fine. The score is at 3,4 Just keep an eye open, obey local rules and you'll most likely be fine.

How many travel advisories do you know for Indonesia?

We currently evaluate 11 official sources each morning. Today, we know of active advisories from 7 individual sources for Indonesia.

What is the current Corona virus situation in Indonesia?

There are currently no officially reported cases of infections with SARS-CoV-2 (or Coronavirus) in Indonesia. As reported by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control this morning (~8:30am CET). There are currently no officially reported deaths related to this disease in Indonesia.

What is the size of Indonesia?

Indonesia has a size of 1,919,440 km² or 741,100 mi² which is slightly less than three times the size of Texas.

Common Frequently Asked Questions

For non-country specific questions, please check our global F.A.Q.

Travel safety map for Indonesia and bordering countries.

Risk level icon

If you want to embed Indonesia travel warning information into your website or application, check out these tools.

  • Is Indonesia safe to travel?
  • What's the safety situation in Indonesia?
  • Are there security warnings for Indonesia?

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2020-03-10: Integrated data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (COVID-19/ SARS-CoV-2/ Coronavirus).

2019-09-01: Added timeline charts for risk level and number of advisories.

2019-07-29: Added two more sources (Finland and Denmark). Affects country ratings.

2019-07-15: South-Sudan was missing and was added today.

2019-05-18: Performance improvements for API users.

2019-03-23: Introduced professional API with more data.

2019-02-13: Added three more sources (Cyprus, Ireland and Malta). Affects country ratings.

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go-explore

Frequently Asked Question related to Covid- 19

1| where can we get covid-19 advisory information in indonesia.

You can contact these numbers below for an update on Covid-19 from The Ministry of Health:

Hotline Emerging Operation Center ( EOC ): 021-5210411 and 081212123119

Depok: 112 and 119

Majalengka District: 112

Sukabumi District: 08001000119 / 0266-6243816

Bandung District: 082118219287

Garut District: 0262-2802800 and 119

Indramayu District: 08111333314

Kuningan District: 081388284346

Cirebon District: 0231 - 8800119 / 081998800119

Bekasi District: 112/119 - 021 89910039 - 08111139927 085283980119

Cirebon: 119

Bogor: 0251-8363335, 08111116093

Purwakarta District: 112 / 081909514472

Bogor District: 119 dan 112

Ciamis District: 119 - 081394489808 - 085314993901

Karawang District: 085282537355 - 119

Cianjur District: 085321161119

Cimahi: 08122126256 and 081221423039

Banjar : 085223344119 and 082120370313

Pangandaran District : 119/085320643695

Sumedang District: 119

West Bandung District: 089522434611

Tasikmalaya District: 119

Bandung: 112 and 119.

Subang District: 081322916001 / 082115467455

Halo Kemkes: 1500567

Twitter: @KemenkesRI

Facebook: @KementrianKesehatanRI

Instagram: @kemenkes_ri

Website: https://www.kemkes.go.id/ and https://infeksiemerging.kemkes.go.id/

Q & A Covid-19: https://infeksiemerging.kemkes.go.id/qna-pertanyaan-dan-jawaban-terkait-covid-19-update-6-maret-2020/#.Xm77OJMzZQJ

2| What can we do to help prevent the spread of Covid-19?

Be a responsible traveler and practice protection measures as simple precautions

3| What are the latest restrictions on entering Indonesia?

Indonesia continues to monitor the reports regarding the worldwide spread of the COVID-19 outbreak issued by the WHO. Based on a recent report by the WHO, presently there is a significant increase in the spread of Covid-19 beyond the Republic of China, namely in Iran, Italy, the Vatican, Spain, France, German, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. In this regard, the Government of the Republic of Indonesia is temporarily undertaking new policy measures for travelers from the above-mentioned countries, in order to ensure public safety.

You can find complete information here .

4| Are there any tourist attractions in Indonesia that are temporarily closed to the public?

There are 34 provinces in Indonesia, and each has its own policy regarding the temporary closing of its main tourist attractions. You can find the information about some cities that had already published their public announcement here .

5| What is the hotline number for emergencies on Covid-19?

Contact the Hotline number from the Ministry of Health at 119 ext 9 for emergencies related to Covid-19

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Closed Tourism Spots Due to COVID-19 Outbreak

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The Policy of The Government of The Republic of Indonesia on The Developments Regarding Covid-19

The Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy Prioritizes in Protecting Public Health in the Midst of the COVID-19 Outbreak

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List of Postponed Public Events in Indonesia

indonesia state department travel advisory

Visit our other website

This is the official website of the Ministry of Tourism, Republic of Indonesia. The contents listed on this website are intended for informational purposes rather than commercial. Any displayed sale is meant as a token of partnership and will always redirect you to our partners' sites.

indonesia state department travel advisory

Is Jamaica safe? State Department advisory raises concerns; here’s what to know

  • Updated: Apr. 11, 2024, 10:21 a.m. |
  • Published: Apr. 11, 2024, 7:59 a.m.

Is Jamaica safe?

Bamboo Avenue, near YS Falls in southern Jamaica. Numerous American travelers to Jamaica say they're reluctant to leave their resorts because of the State Department's updated travel advisory. Susan Glaser, Cleveland.com

  • Susan Glaser, cleveland.com

MONTEGO BAY, Jamaica – Two months before my planned trip to Jamaica, the U.S. State Department advised Americans to “reconsider travel” to the popular Caribbean nation.

I considered their advice and I went anyway.

It did give me pause, however, and prompted me to make a few adjustments to the trip.

First, I bought travel insurance for this trip – which I might have done anyway, but the travel advisory confirmed its necessity. Second, I employed a local guide to show me around, rather than exploring on my own. Again, I might have done this anyway, but the travel advisory made it a priority.

The result: I had a great trip, did everything I wanted (and more) and never felt unsafe (well, except perhaps on some of those narrow, windy inland roads alongside some crazy local drivers).

I met plenty of American travelers, however, who were pretty spooked about the updated advisory. Some said they considered canceling their trips. Others said they didn’t feel comfortable venturing from their resorts.

Business owners on the island told me they were already feeling the effects of the advisory.

“Even people who are coming aren’t leaving the resorts,” said Simon Browne, whose family owns YS Falls, a popular waterfall and swimming area on the south side of Jamaica. “It’s been a quiet March.”

Milton Williams, who cooks jerk chicken and other delights along the highway between Montego Bay and Negril, was also feeling the loss of business.

“Lots of people have canceled their vacations,” he told me, as I feasted on his chicken.

I was glad I wasn’t one of them.

What the State Department said

The State Department uses a four-point scale to assess the safety of travel to every country in the world. Level 1 is the safest (“exercise normal precautions”) and Level 4 is the most dangerous (“do not travel”).

In March 2022, Jamaica was elevated from Level 2 (“exercise increased caution”) to Level 3 (“reconsider travel”).

In January, the State Department updated its advisory with additional details about areas of concern, citing specifically crime and medical services in the country.

A spokeswoman for the State Department called the update “routine” and said there was no specific incident that spurred the advisory. She said the crime information remains substantively unchanged from the previous advisory.

Routine or not, the media reported the update as major news, sparking concern about travel to the country during the busy winter and spring vacation season.

Indeed, the language included in the advisory is enough to give any traveler pause. “Violent crimes, such as home invasions, armed robberies, sexual assaults, and homicides, are common,” it reads. “Sexual assaults occur frequently, including at all-inclusive resorts.”

It continues, “Local police often do not respond effectively to serious criminal incidents. When arrests are made, cases are infrequently prosecuted to a conclusive sentence. Families of U.S. citizens killed in accidents or homicides frequently wait a year or more for final death certificates to be issued by Jamaican authorities. The homicide rate reported by the Government of Jamaica has for several years been among the highest in the Western Hemisphere.”

It goes on to list specific geographic areas of concern, and strongly encourages travelers to obtain traveler’s insurance, including medical evacuation insurance, before traveling to Jamaica.

In response to the advisory, the Jamaican Tourist Board noted that crime involving visitors “remains extremely low at 0.01%,” adding, “Jamaica has recorded its lowest crime rate in 24 years in 2023 and this downward trajectory has continued in 2024.”

It’s worth noting that other countries that issue travel advisories to their citizens have not change their guidance on Jamaica in recent years.

Canada, for example, has a similar four-point system for assessing danger. Jamaica is a level 2 (“exercise a high degree of caution”), which is the same as for the Dominican Republic, the Bahamas, Trinidad and Tobago and other Caribbean nations.

Both the United States and Canada cite Jamaica’s high crime rate as among the reasons for concern.

Indeed, Jamaica does have one of the highest murder rates in the world. But both locals and security experts point out that violence in Jamaica is almost never targeted at tourists.

“Jamaicans often told me – Jamaica is only dangerous for Jamaicans,” said Paul Doucet, security director at International SOS , a private health and security service firm.

Doucet visited Jamaica in February, shortly after the State Department updated its advisory, to see for himself whether anything had changed in Jamaica to warrant increased concern.

His conclusion: “It’s fine to go to Jamaica with an understanding of the areas to avoid.”

He added, “We haven’t changed our advice. We haven’t seen any reason to change our advice.”

Doucet acknowledged the country’s high crime rate, but said everyone – from the government to gang members – understands it’s not smart to target tourists, who contributed $4.3 billion to the nation’s economy in 2023.

“No one has an interest in seeing tourism decline,” said Doucet.

He also said that the country’s high homicide rate probably isn’t the best statistic for concerned travelers to worry about. Sexual assaults, carjackings and short-term kidnappings (which he noted are not a problem in Jamaica) are typically a bigger concern for tourists on vacation.

“There’s actually been an improvement in crime in Jamaica,” he said, although he noted that the numbers are subject to underreporting.

Lee Weinstock, a Shaker Heights native who runs a tourism business in Montego Bay, said he has been a victim of crime twice in Jamaica in more than 30 years. His apartment was broken into once, as was his car.

He speculates that there might be a political motivation for the State Department advisory – that it’s a way for the U.S. government to register its discontent with increasing Chinese investment in Jamaica, or disapproval of Jamaica’s anti-LGBTQ laws and policies.

The spokeswoman for the State Department denied that there were political reasons for the update. “This analysis is undertaken without regard to bilateral political or economic considerations,” she said.

She provided this explanation about the process: “Travel Advisories are based on a comprehensive and objective review of safety and security conditions, and ongoing developments that could affect the lives and interests of U.S. citizens abroad. We consider many factors to determine the Travel Advisory level for each country, including crime, terrorist activity, civil unrest, kidnapping or hostage taking, health risks, natural disasters/weather, and current events. The information we use to formulate Travel Advisories is collected from a range of sources, such as crime statistics and other publicly-available information, and information gathered from U.S. government sources, including assessments by our embassies and consulates abroad.”

I asked Doucet if the safety I felt in Jamaica was a good gauge of how safe I actually was.

“If you’re traveling around and didn’t go into areas you shouldn’t go, you probably were safe,” he said.

He noted that he spent some time in downtown Montego Bay – not an area where most tourists visit – and didn’t feel particularly safe.

“It was crowded,” he said. “There were a lot people who looked like they didn’t have enough to do.”

Common sense, he said, goes a long way in Jamaica and elsewhere.

“Don’t flash around money,” he said. “Don’t hold three iPhones in your hands.”

Being cautious, however, doesn’t mean being fearful.

Nicole Tutzer from Bainbridge Township traveled to Jamaica last month with her 18-year-old daughter Annika. “They told us – don’t leave the resort by yourself,” said Tutzer, who was staying at the resort next to mine in Montego Bay.

She and her daughter walked across the street to buy water shoes and bug spray and felt perfectly safe.

I, too, left my resort every day – both on foot and with licensed drivers – and also never felt remotely unsafe.

Needless to say, I didn’t visit the areas that were outlined in the State Department advisory, which are well known to locals as areas to avoid.

Honestly, there are plenty of areas in and around Cleveland that I know to avoid, particularly at night and when I’m alone. It seems obvious to use that same commonsense approach when I travel.

Safety in Jamaica

In addition to recommending travel insurance, the State Department offers these suggestions to Americans traveling to Jamaica:

* Avoid walking or driving at night.

* Avoid public buses.

* Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.

* Be aware of your surroundings and keep a low profile.

* Do not attempt to bring firearms or ammunition into the country.

* Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.

Information: travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories/jamaica-travel-advisory.html

5 days in Jamaica, from Negril to Montego Bay, beaches, bamboo rafting and waterfalls

Will this new Frontier flight from Cleveland to the Caribbean last? Enjoy it while you can

How a guy from Shaker Heights built a 30-year tourism career in Jamaica

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  • International

April 11, 2024 - Israel-Hamas war

By Heather Chen , Antoinette Radford, Tori B. Powell , Aditi Sangal and Elise Hammond , CNN

Our live coverage of Israel's war on Hamas in Gaza has moved  here .

UN committee fails to reach consensus on full Palestinian membership, Security Council president says

From CNN’s Richard Roth and Michael Rios

A specialized UN committee failed to reach a consensus Thursday on Palestinian membership in the United Nations, according to the president of the UN Security Council.

Two-thirds of the committee members were in favor of moving on with membership, with many countries arguing that “Palestine fulfills all the criteria that are required” to be granted full state member status, Malta's Ambassador and Security Council President Vanessa Frazier said. 

She added that no one explicitly objected to the membership qualifications.

Frazier also said she would circulate a draft report on the deliberations as soon as Friday. If the committee doesn’t agree on the report, it could hold another meeting to iron out any differences.

Asked whether the process of deliberating Palestinian membership in the committee is now over, Frazier said, “Unless the next step of agreeing (to) the report of the committee warrants another meeting to iron out the differences, it’s not foreseen that there would be any further committee action.”

But she noted that any UN Security Council member can still table a resolution to vote on Palestinian membership at any time, regardless of the committee's report.

The US and Middle East brace for a possible Iran attack that could escalate the conflict. Here's the latest

From CNN staff

People attend the funeral procession for seven Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps members killed in a strike in Syria, which Iran blamed on Israel, in Tehran on April 5.

Concerns about a possible Iranian attack against Israel has prompted many diplomatic conversations around the globe.

Here are some developments on diplomacy around the threat of an attack:

  • Iran's statement: The imperative for Tehran to "punish" Israel for the deadly strike on the Iranian consulate in Damascus last week might have been avoided if the attack had been condemned at the United Nations, Iran’s Mission to the UN said Thursday.
  • US and UK diplomacy: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken spoke with the foreign ministers of Turkey, China and Saudi Arabia on Wednesday night and Thursday morning to tell them that countries should be urging Iran not to escalate the conflict in the Middle East after  threats made by Tehran against Israel,  according to a State Department spokesperson. The top US general for the Middle East is also in Israel . Additionally, Britain's foreign secretary warned his Iranian counterpart on Thursday that Tehran “must not draw” the Middle East into a wider conflict .
  • Israel receives US support: Israeli Defense Minister Yoav Gallant spoke with Blinken and US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin. The US officials expressed the country's support for Israel against Iranian threats. Gallant warned that such an attack could lead to a regional escalation.
  • Travel restrictions: The US State Department restricted the travel of US government personnel in Israel in the wake of public threats against Israel by Iran. “The security environment remains complex and can change quickly depending on the political situation and recent events,” the alert noted. US officials  are on high alert  for a potential retaliatory strike by Iran or its proxies against Israel.

Meanwhile, here's some other updates:

  • Hamas on hostages: A member of Hamas' political bureau said   a prisoner-hostage exchange is being discussed as part of larger ceasefire negotiations. "Part of negotiations is to reach a ceasefire agreement to have enough time and safety to collect final and more precise data" on the hostages held in Gaza, Basem Naim said in a statement on Thursday. "Because they (hostages) are in different palaces, (being held) by different groups, some of them are under the rubble killed with our own people, and we negotiate to get heavy equipment for this purpose."
  • Updates on aid to Gaza: It is clear that Israel is working to ramp up humanitarian aid to Gaza, but it has not yet implemented all of the measures it has announced, a top United Nations humanitarian official said. Aid coming in trucks from Israel has to be "segregated from water, from food, from medical items" before it goes into Gaza, said Jamie McGoldrick, the UN’s humanitarian coordinator in Jerusalem. “Getting 400 trucks from Kerem Shalom doesn't mean 400 trucks go into Gaza,” he said, adding that the logistical complications are numerous, and take time to resolve. He also said Israel’s restrictions on movement inside the strip complicate matters.

Anera charity resumes work in Gaza after pausing when Israeli strike killed 7 World Central Kitchen staff

From CNN's Tala Alrajjal and Mohammed Tawfeeq

American Near East Refugee Aid (Anera) has resumed Gaza operations "after a temporary pause" following an airstrike that killed seven World Central Kitchen (WCK) aid workers on April 1.

"As you know, the decision to temporarily pause our operations was not an easy one. We followed the direction of our staff in Gaza, who've faced death, loss, and destruction since the start of the war," Sean Carroll, the president and CEO of Anera, said in a statement on Thursday. "After the killing of Anera staff member Mousa Shawwa , followed by the attack that killed seven aid workers from World Central Kitchen, we made the difficult but necessary decision to pause aid operations on April 2," Carroll added in the statement.

Carroll said Israeli authorities informed him during a meeting Thursday that "certain measures would be taken to protect humanitarian aid workers in Gaza – including Anera's staff."

"With the full support of our Gaza team, we have determined that the circumstances have changed sufficiently to resume our vital humanitarian work in Gaza," Carroll said. 

Anera on Thursday resumed "full operations in Gaza to deliver meals, food parcels, hygiene kits, tents, medical treatments, and more to families in dire need," according to the statement.

Iran says its imperative to punish Israel could have been avoided had UN Security Council condemned attack

From CNN’s Natalie Barr and Adam Pourahmadi

Emergency services work at a building hit by an air strike in Damascus, Syria, on April 1.

The imperative for Tehran to "punish" Israel for the deadly strike on the Iranian consulate in Damascus last week might have been avoided if the attack had been condemned at the United Nations, Iran’s Mission to the UN said Thursday.

“Had the UN Security Council condemned the Zionist regime’s reprehensible act of aggression on our diplomatic premises in Damascus and subsequently brought to justice its perpetrators, the imperative for Iran to punish this rogue regime might have been obviated," the  mission said on X.

The UN Secretary-General António Guterres condemned the attack on April 1, according to a statement from the UN spokesperson Stephan Dujarric. A Security Council discussion was held on April 2 to discuss the attack, but differences among members prevented any formal action or condemnation from taking place.

The United States is on high alert and actively preparing for a “significant” attack by Iran targeting Israeli or American assets in the region  in response to the strike in Damascus  that killed top Iranian commanders.

UK foreign secretary warns Iran not to draw Middle East into wider conflict

From CNN's Natalie Barr

British Foreign Secretary David Cameron speaks during a joint press conference with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken in Washington, DC, on April 9.

Britain's foreign secretary warned his Iranian counterpart on Thursday that Tehran “must not draw” the Middle East into a wider conflict following a series of escalating threats made by Iran toward Israel.

British Foreign Secretary David Cameron told Iran's Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian that the United Kingdom was "deeply concerned about the potential for miscalculation leading to further violence. Iran should instead work to de-escalate and prevent further attacks," according to a post on X .

Iran's state-aligned Tasnim news agency on Thursday reported that Amir-Abdollahian had told Cameron that the silence from the UK and the United States following Israel’s attack on the Iranian consulate in Damascus last week only served to encourage Israel to continue waging war in Gaza and expand its conflict in the region.

US and Israeli defense leaders discuss fears of Iranian attack

From CNN’s Michael Conte in Washington, DC, Tamar Michaelis in Jerusalem and Larry Register in Atlanta

US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin spoke with Israeli Defense Minister Yoav Gallant today to “reaffirm the US ironclad commitment to Israel’s security against threats from Iran and its proxies,” according to a Pentagon spokesperson.

The call comes a day after Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said Israel " must be punished and it will be" following a strike on an Iranian embassy compound in Syria that killed seven Iranian officials.

Israel “will not tolerate an Iranian attack on its territory,” the statement read, adding that the two defense leaders also discussed detailed preparations “for an Iranian attack against the State of Israel.”

Gallant said an Iranian attack on Israel could lead to a regional escalation.

It is the second discussion held between Gallant and Austin over the past week, according to the statement. Gallant expressed his appreciation for Austin’s personal commitment to the security of the State of Israel and for the deepening cooperation between the defense establishments of both countries, as well as between the Israel Defense Forces and US CENTCOM.

State Department restricts personnel travel in Israel amid concerns over Iranian threats

From CNN's Jennifer Hansler

The US State Department has restricted the travel of US government personnel in Israel in the wake of public threats against Israel by Iran.

“Out of an abundance of caution, U.S. government employees and their family members are restricted from personal travel outside the greater Tel Aviv (including Herzliya, Netanya, and Even Yehuda), Jerusalem, and Be’er Sheva areas until further notice,” a  security alert  posted by the US Embassy Thursday said. “U.S. government personnel are authorized to transit between these three areas for personal travel.” “The security environment remains complex and can change quickly depending on the political situation and recent events,” the alert noted.

State Department spokesperson Matthew Miller said he would not “speak to the specific assessments that led to us to restrict our employees and family members’ personal travel, but clearly we are monitoring the threat environment in the Middle East and specifically in Israel.”

“We have seen Iran making public threats against Israel in the past few days,” Miller said. “Israel is in a very tough neighborhood and we have been monitoring the security situation. You saw us slightly adjust for travel warnings at the beginning of this conflict and we conduct ongoing assessments all the time about the situation on the ground.”

US officials are on high alert for a potential retaliatory strike by Iran or its proxies against Israel.

Hamas says ceasefire with Israel is essential to collect data on hostages held in Gaza by different groups

From CNN's Abeer Salman and Mohammed Tawfeeq

A member of Hamas' political bureau said   a prisoner-hostage exchange is being discussed as part of larger ceasefire negotiations.

"Part of negotiations is to reach a ceasefire agreement to have enough time and safety to collect final and more precise data" on the hostages held in Gaza Basem Naim said in a statement on Thursday. "Because they (hostages) are in different palaces, (being held) by different groups, some of them are under the rubble killed with our own people, and we negotiate to get heavy equipment for this purpose," he added.

Naim's statement was in response to questions from media outlets about whether Hamas has been rejecting the latest proposal, which was made in Cairo over the weekend, because it can not release 40 hostages in the first phase of a three-stage ceasefire deal.

According to an Israeli official and a source familiar with the discussions, Hamas indicated it is currently unable to identify and track down those 40 Israeli hostages, raising fears that more hostages may be dead than are publicly known. 

CNN's record of the conditions of the hostages also suggests there are fewer than 40 living hostages who meet the proposed criteria.

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U.s. advisory regarding china travel 'makes no sense'.

The U.S. Department of State's rating of advisory for travels to China "makes no sense", Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Mao Ning said on Wednesday, urging the U.S. to revise the advisory.

Mao made the remarks at a daily news conference, after U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Kurt Campbell reportedly said the U.S. is considering easing advisories against its citizens traveling to China.

The U.S. has issued a level-3 advisory on travel to China, calling on Americans to "reconsider" such travels.

The advisory has deterred many Americans who are willing to come to China, Mao said.

"We hope the U.S. will withdraw the unfounded advisory and readjust the wrong rating as soon as possible to move this obstacle to China-U.S. people-to-people exchanges," Mao said.

indonesia state department travel advisory

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U.S. issues travel warning for Israel as Iran expected to attack any time

Tel Aviv  — Israel is bracing for a worst-case scenario that U.S. officials believe could materialize within just hours — the possibility of a direct attack on Israeli soil by Iran in retaliation for a strike almost two weeks ago that killed seven Iranian military officers. Iran has vowed to take revenge for Israel killing its commanders, who were hit by an April 1 strike on the Iranian embassy in Syria's capital.

Two U.S. officials told CBS News that a major Iranian attack against Israel was expected as soon as Friday, possibly to include more than 100 drones and dozens of missiles aimed at military targets inside the country. Sources have told CBS News the retaliation could include attacks carried out both by Iranian forces, and proxy groups around the region that it has been funnelling additional arms to for weeks.  

The officials said it would be challenging for the Israelis to defend against an attack of that magnitude, and while they held out the possibility that the Iranians could opt for a smaller-scale attack to avoid a dramatic escalation, their retaliation was believed to be imminent. 

Asked Friday how imminent he believes an attack is, President Biden responded, "I don't want to get into secure information, but my expectation is sooner than later." The president urged Iran not to move forward, saying his message to Tehran was: "Don't."

Tehran has not indicated publicly how or when it will return fire, so it's unclear how far Iran's leaders will go. If they decide to carry out a direct attack on Israel, there's fear it could blow Israel's ongoing war against Iranian ally Hamas up into a much wider regional conflict.

With the Iranian retaliation expected at any time, the U.S. State Department on Thursday warned Americans in Israel not to travel outside major cities, which are better protected from incoming rocket fire by the country's Iron Dome missile defense system. The latest guidance noted that travel by U.S. government employees in Israel could be further restricted with little notice as things develop in the tinderbox region.

"Whoever harms us, we will harm them," Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vowed Thursday as he visited troops at an Israel Defense Forces airbase. "We are prepared … both defensively and offensively."

Sima Shine, a security expert and former official with Israel's national intelligence agency Mossad, told CBS News it was a dangerous moment for the region, and the "most worried" she has been. She said anxiety over an all-out war was likely just as high "on both sides, in Israel and in Iran."

If Iran does choose to strike Israel directly, it could involve a complex missile and drone attack similar to the one Iranian forces launched against a Saudi oil facility in 2019 .

"They will try to do it on the military or some military asset," Shine predicted. "But the question will be the damage. If there would be many injured people, killed or injured … I think it has the potential for a huge escalation."

Shine stressed, however, that she still believes neither side actually wants a regional conflict.

U.S. "really trying to avoid war"

The U.S. sent a senior general to Israel this week to coordinate with the close American ally on any response it might make to an Iranian attack. Speaking Friday on "CBS Mornings," America's top military officer said, "we're really trying to avoid war."

"This is part of the dialogue that I have with my counterparts within the region, to include the Israeli chief of defense, who I talked to yesterday," said Joint Chiefs chairman Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr., adding that the U.S. military was "doing things not only to prevent a war, but at the same time, one of my primary things is to make sure all the forces in the region are protected."

"My role, as the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, is to plan and prepare," Brown said. "That's one thing we do very well."

Brown's Israeli counterpart, Chief of the General Staff Lt. Gen. Herzi Halevi, "completed a comprehensive situational assessment on the readiness of the IDF for all scenarios," Israel's military said Friday. 

"The IDF is very strongly prepared, both offensively and defensively, against any threat," Halevi was quoted as saying in the statement. "The IDF continues to monitor closely what is happening in Iran and different arenas, constantly preparing to deal with existing and potential threats in coordination with the United States Armed Forces." 

The IDF said the visiting U.S. general, Central Command chief Gen. Michael Erik Kurilla, was taking part in the IDF's situational assessment.

The dilemma for Iran, said Israeli expert Shine, is to figure out how to deliver its promised response to Israel's attack in Syria, but in a way that does not lead to further escalation. Likewise, Shine said Israel could choose to show restraint when it responds to whatever Iran eventually does.

If either side gets the balance wrong, the consequences for the region, and even the world, could be dire.

Weijia Jiang, David Martin, Margaret Brennan and Olivia Gazis contributed reporting.

Iran-Burning Flags Of The U.S. And Israel

IMAGES

  1. Indonesia Government implements new travel restrictions for foreigners

    indonesia state department travel advisory

  2. Dept. of State issues new travel advisory system

    indonesia state department travel advisory

  3. State Department Launches Travel Advisory System

    indonesia state department travel advisory

  4. How to Read Travel Advisories to Increase Your Safety Abroad

    indonesia state department travel advisory

  5. The Travel Advisory for Every Country, according to https://travel

    indonesia state department travel advisory

  6. State Department Launches New Travel Advisory Program

    indonesia state department travel advisory

COMMENTS

  1. Indonesia Travel Advisory

    Read the entire Travel Advisory. Do Not travel to: The provinces of Central Papua (Papua Tengah) and Highland Papua (Papua Pegunungan) due to civil unrest. Terrorists continue plotting possible attacks in Indonesia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting police stations, places of worship, hotels, bars, nightclubs, markets ...

  2. Indonesia International Travel Information

    Quick Facts. Six months beyond arrival date. Indonesia does not accept the 12-page U.S. emergency passport for entry into Indonesia. Two blank visa pages required for entry stamp. Yes, Visa or Visa on Arrival. None. 100,000,000 Indonesian rupia (approx. $7,000 USD)

  3. Travel Advisories

    Indonesia Travel Advisory : Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution: July 24, 2023: Iran Travel Advisory : Level 4: Do Not Travel ... Links to external websites are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as an endorsement by the U.S. Department of State of the views or products contained therein. If you wish to remain on travel.state ...

  4. Indonesia

    Since July, 2021 the United States has donated 42,300,040 safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine doses with the people of Indonesia. This includes 32,799,780 Pfizer and 9,500,260 Moderna doses. Of the 42,300,040 vaccine doses, 100% were donated in partnership with COVAX. The United States is committed to leading an international and coordinated ...

  5. COVID-19 Information

    Requirements to enter Indonesia: Please consult the Indonesia travel page at Travel.State.Gov for full information about travel to Indonesia.. Entry Requirements: Starting on June 9, 2023, the Indonesian Government no longer requires proof of vaccination.

  6. Alert: Government Announces New Travel Restrictions

    Location: Indonesia Event: Government Announces New Travel Restrictions Effective September 19, 2021, the Government of Indonesia (GOI) introduced new Effective September 19, 2021, the Government of Indonesia (GOI) introduced new travel requirements and COVID-19 testing procedures which will affect all travelers arriving to or traveling within Indonesia.

  7. Travel.State.Gov CSI

    Travel.State.Gov CSI is a web tool that allows you to view the travel advisories and safety information for any country in the world. You can zoom in and out, search by name, or click on the map to see the details. For example, you can learn about the current situation in Indonesia, where some areas have increased risk of terrorism and natural disasters.

  8. Advisory on COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019 )

    30 November 2023. New International Travel Regulations to Enter Indonesia as of 1 February 2022. As an immediate follow-up to prevent the spread of SARS-COV-2 B.1.1.529 from South Africa and some other countries in the world, COVID-19 Task Force issued the Circular of the Head of the COVID-19 Handling Task Force Number 4 of 2022 regarding International Travel Health Protocol during the Corona ...

  9. New International Travel Regulations to Enter ...

    New International Travel Regulations to Enter Indonesia as of 10 November 2022. Tue, 19 Dec 2023. JAKARTA, 21 December 2022 - As an immediate response to recover tourism industry and relaxing the international travel restrictions, COVID-19 Task Force issued the Circular Letter of the COVID-19 Task Force Number 25 of 2022 concerning Health ...

  10. Alert: COVID-19 Update 2021 Indonesian Travel Restrictions

    Visit travel.state.gov to view individual Travel Advisories for the most urgent threats to safety and security. Visit the Department of Homeland Security's website on the latest travel restrictions to the United States. Click here for our Travel to the U.S. FAQs. For further information: U.S. Embassy Jakarta, Indonesia +62-21-5083-1000

  11. Alert: COVID-19 Travel Update U.S. Embassy Jakarta

    U.S. Consular Agency in Bali, Indonesia. +62-361-233-605 or +62-21-5083-1000 after hours. [email protected]. For regular updates, follow the U.S. Consulate General in Surabaya on Twitter and Facebook and the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta at Twitter and Facebook. State Department - Consular Affairs.

  12. COVID-19 Travel Advisory for Indonesia

    Advisory on Coronavirus for Travelers to Indonesia. Tue, 17 Mar 2020. Due to the recent concern regarding the outbreak of COVID-19 in Indonesia, the Government of the Republic of Indonesia would be implementing the following measures in order to minimize the risk of the pandemic from spreading even further: 1| The Government continues to ...

  13. Indonesia Travel Advisory

    U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE — BUREAU of CONSULAR AFFAIRS. Travel.State.Gov > Travel Advisories > Indonesia Travel Advisory . Congressional Liaison; Special Issuance Agency; Legal Resources

  14. Indonesia

    US State Dept Travel Advisory. The US Department of State currently recommends US citizens exercise increased caution in Indonesia due to terrorism and natural disasters. ... [62] (21) 3435-9000; US Embassy Jakarta, Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan No. 3 - 5, Jakarta 10110, Indonesia; [email protected]; https://id.usembassy.gov/ Telephone Code ...

  15. Briefing on the Secretary's Upcoming Travel to Indonesia and Thailand

    As we announced just this morning and as Ned mentioned, Secretary Blinken will travel to Bali, Indonesia, to attend the G20 foreign ministers' meeting. Our Indonesian friends have done an admirable job as the G20 president, and the Secretary looks forward to meeting with his good friend, Indonesia Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi, for a ...

  16. Indonesia

    Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State. Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home. Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace. While at your ...

  17. After a year without tourists, Bali will reopen for foreign travel in

    The U.S. State Department has issued a Level 4 travel advisory for Indonesia, its highest, warning travelers of potential terrorism and natural disasters. Share this article Share

  18. Travel advice and advisories for Indonesia

    Indonesia has 129 active volcanoes and periodically experiences major volcanic events that can be dangerous, even life-threatening. Ash clouds can disrupt air travel, including on the island of Bali, and cause or worsen respiratory problems. Active volcanoes are monitored to provide residents with an early warning should unusual activity occur.

  19. Indonesia Travel Advisory

    Indonesia shares a land border with 3 neighbouring states. For this region of countries (including Indonesia), the Advisory Index is 3.3 (average value over all countries). All countries have some reported advisories: Papua New Guinea (3.8), East Timor with 3.2 and Malaysia with 2.8 (of 5).

  20. Security Alert: U.S. Embassy Jerusalem (April 11, 2024)

    E-mail: [email protected] Website: https://il.usembassy.gov/ State Department - Consular Affairs 888-407-4747or 202-501-4444 Israel, West Bank, and Gaza Country Information Israel, West Bank, and Gaza Travel Advisory Enroll in Safe Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security updates.

  21. Public Schedule

    ***THE DAILY PUBLIC SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE*** SECRETARY ANTONY J. BLINKEN 8:00 a.m. Secretary Blinken, Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III, and National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan meet with Philippine Secretary of Foreign Affairs Enrique Manalo, Philippine Secretary of National Defense Gilberto Teodoro, and Philippine National Security Advisor Eduardo M. Año at the Department ...

  22. COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

    1| Where can we get Covid-19 advisory information in Indonesia? You can contact these numbers below for an update on Covid-19 from The Ministry of Health: Hotline Emerging Operation Center ( EOC ): 021-5210411 and 081212123119. Depok: 112 and 119. Majalengka District: 112. Sukabumi District: 08001000119 / 0266-6243816.

  23. Is Jamaica safe? State Department advisory raises concerns; here's what

    Bamboo Avenue, near YS Falls in southern Jamaica. Numerous American travelers to Jamaica say they're reluctant to leave their resorts because of the State Department's updated travel advisory.

  24. Security Alert for U.S. Citizens April 8, 2024

    Location: Mogadishu Event: The U.S. Embassy in Nairobi has received information about threats to multiple locations in Mogadishu, including Aden Adde International Airport in Mogadishu. All movements of U.S. Embassy personnel have been canceled for Tuesday, April 9, 2024. The U.S. Department of State level-four travel advisory ("do not travel") for Somalia remains in effect due to crime ...

  25. Indonesia

    The US Department of State currently recommends US citizens exercise increased caution in Indonesia due to terrorism and natural disasters. Some areas have increased risk. Consult its website via the link below for updates to travel advisories and statements on safety, security, local laws, and special circumstances in this country. https ...

  26. Message for U.S. Citizens: Update on Travel to Puerto Penasco

    Department of State - Consular Affairs: +1-888-407-4747 or +1-202-501-4444. Links: Mexico International Travel Information U.S. Passports. Smart Traveler Enrollment Program. Traveler's Checklist. Department of State on Facebook and X. U.S. Embassy in Mexico on Facebook and X

  27. April 11, 2024

    Travel restrictions: The US State Department restricted the travel of US government personnel in Israel in the wake of public threats against Israel by Iran. "The security environment remains ...

  28. U.S. advisory regarding China travel 'makes no sense'

    The U.S. Department of State's rating of advisory for travels to China "makes no sense", Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Mao Ning said on Wednesday, urging the U.S. to revise the advisory.

  29. U.S. issues travel warning for Israel as Iran expected to attack ...

    Two U.S. officials told CBS News that a major Iranian attack against Israel was expected as soon as Friday, possibly to include more than 100 drones and dozens of missiles aimed at military ...

  30. Assistant Secretary Pyatt's Travel to Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania

    Bureau of Energy Resources Assistant Secretary Geoffrey R. Pyatt will travel April 8-12 to Tallinn, Estonia; Riga, Latvia; and Vilnius, Lithuania. He will engage with senior interlocutors on regional energy security issues, including the Baltic states' swift progress de-coupling from Russian energy; continued support for Ukraine's energy sector under the G7+ partnership in the face of ...